2022 French Presidential Election

meiam

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An interesting graphic showing where votes transferred between the first and second round;
Some of those stats are wild.

Who vote for Macron round 1 then Le Pen (tbf thats probably within margin)?! Why would anyone vote Zemmour then switch to Macron? Protest vote for Le Pen is interesting, it's not like she was the darkhorse or anything, maybe strategic voting to try and avoid somebody else making it to round 2 that might have a better shot at beating Macron?

Anyway, vote was somewhat close but not too close. I think if the vote happened maybe a year later things would have been different, inflation going up usually means incumbent get kicked out even if its the results of factor entirely outside their control. Plus Macron got a boost from the Ukraine crisis and Le Pen link to Putin.
Side note, but I like that the fact that Le Pen being a women essentially didn't feature in the election at all (as far as I can tell), pretty sure she would have been the first Presidente.

Legislative election still will happen soon too and that's going to be complicated, doubtful EM will get a majority so they'll need to partner and that might make things very messy. Not sure if Macron will actually raise retirement age, you know the country will be paralyzed for months if even get close to it, I think he has better chance of reforming it in a way that people can still technically retired at 62 but might have to work longer to get full benefit. It's unfortunate to say, but economy can't really handle people not working for 20-30 years after retiring and it really suck for current and future generation if they end up paying for their parent retirement (who tend to be richer than their kids). Maybe move toward a system where part of people estate goes to the state after they pass to pay back retirement benefit that they collected.
 

Gergar12

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As someone who despises anti-NATO lefty people, and religious authoritarians. I don’t agree with Macron, and his censorship campaign, he’s obviously trying to deflect from his poor handling of his PR from bad policy decisions. But more to the point I have never liked how people like to demonize vs argue against a position. I do it too against China, Russia, Iran, North Korea, and Fox News plus other actors I disagree with, but there are tens of millions of people who agree with these positions. French generals have argued against MENA Muslims who live in suburbs, well maybe the reason they live there is due to high housing costs, not because they want to murder white French people in a future race war. I have no love for French lefties. i have not seen a single one I have liked. But the way to counter them is to argue against them.
 

crimson5pheonix

It took 6 months to read my title.
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Stating facts is "moderate white supremacy"?
Now this is a spicy take. Macron, with no pushing, linked leftism with islam with terrorism to start justifying purges from academia. That is what the rest of us call racism and fascism.
 
K

ko11b

Guest
It's funny how they call it an election so they think they all cool and shit it's funny

When I read the absolute monarchy when it said leadership the way God I intended it to be

Thats Gods Chosen The real Gods chosen it's not an election lol ..

Leadership the way it was intended it to be
 

Silvanus

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First round of the parliamentary election was on Sunday 12th. To contest it, six left-wing parties formed a coalition, the most important members being: La France Insoumise, the Socialist Party (PS), the Communist Party of France (PCF), and the Greens (EELV).

It was a very very thin margin, but the coalition succeeded in attaining the highest voteshare in the first round, at 25.7% (against 25.3% for Macron's En Marche!)

Second round is on 19th.

Please, let this be a message to the British left as well as the French, that the road to success is in electoral cooperation and pact-forming.
 
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Agema

You have no authority here, Jackie Weaver
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Please, let this be a message to the British left as well as the French, that the road to success is in electoral cooperation and pact-forming.
If the recent by-elections are anything to go by, maybe. Labour has ignored Tiverton and Honiton, and the LDs Wakefield. They've not gone so far as pulling their candidates, but they have conspicuously declined to meaningfully campaign in each other's targets. This of course may be deliberate, because if voters suspect too much of a stitch-up, it could potentially backfire.
 

Silvanus

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Blech, I fucking despair.

But if any electoral pacts are going to be formed by Labour, they'd be with the Lib Dems, SNP, Plaid Cymru or the Greens, none of whom are likely to care about this.
 

Agema

You have no authority here, Jackie Weaver
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Blech, I fucking despair.
I don't. Firstly, it's trivial - this isn't significantly bullying Corbyn at all. Not least because it's kind of true.

The fact is that Corbyn was a leader who had such flaws that he ended up a massive electoral liability to his own party and policies, which is part of why his successor so vigorously repudiates him.
 

Silvanus

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I don't. Firstly, it's trivial - this isn't significantly bullying Corbyn at all. Not least because it's kind of true.

The fact is that Corbyn was a leader who had such flaws that he ended up a massive electoral liability to his own party and policies, which is part of why his successor so vigorously repudiates him.
"Bullying" is a bit much maybe, but it's still pointlessly poking wounds likely to create yet more internal alienation and infighting.

A significant portion of the party sympathised with Corbyn's policy direction, if not the man's personal and managerial flaws. A significant portion of the country did in 2017 too. Its inviting disaffection to sling mud at those within ones own party who might feel that way.
 

Agema

You have no authority here, Jackie Weaver
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"Bullying" is a bit much maybe, but it's still pointlessly poking wounds likely to create yet more internal alienation and infighting.
From what the clip suggests, this term "Conservative Corbyn" came from the Tories, a phrase some brought up to damn their own party leader. It's catchy and apt - why not throw it at Johnson? Should it have to be abandoned because the Corbynistas see criticism of their leader?

I say no. I think Corbyn is incidental here, and I think basically no-one would notice or care, except that the Corbynistas are busy raking up every tiniest slight to criticise and undermine Starmer. That's why the Twitterato above is magnifying this into the grotesque hyperbole of "bullying" and "a very small politician and man".
 

Silvanus

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From what the clip suggests, this term "Conservative Corbyn" came from the Tories, a phrase some brought up to damn their own party leader. It's catchy and apt - why not throw it at Johnson? Should it have to be abandoned because the Corbynistas see criticism of their leader?
It is a criticism of Corbyn alongside one of Johnson; that's not just what fanatics have seen, that's clearly the intent. 'Johnson is bad because he's like Corbyn' is the meaning.

I suppose you could generously interpret Starmer's intent as merely being to highlight internal Tory division, rather than signal-boosting the criticism itself.
 

Agema

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I suppose you could generously interpret Starmer's intent as merely being to highlight internal Tory division, rather than signal-boosting the criticism itself.
Honestly, I think Starmer's intent was about 99% highlighting internal Tory division and lack of confidence in Johnson. It is after all damning because of the context of what Tories think about Jeremy Corbyn, not anyone else.
 

Silvanus

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Projections from the second round of the parliamentary elections (which was/is today) have Ensemble! (Macron's group) returning the largest number of seats at about 200 - 250, but short of a majority; and NUPES (Melenchon's group) returning the second largest number of seats, at about 150 - 200. That would place them as the de facto primary opposition.

The far-right group look to have returned about 80. So a huge increase on their last performance in a parliamentary election, but also drastically short of second place, in contrast to the Presidential election.