50 Americanisms That Brits Apparently Hate

Drexlor

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Feb 23, 2010
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Shopping trolly? The shopping CART was invented in the United States. If anyone is saying it wrong, it would be them, unless they have somehow made carts that look like miniature streetcars.
 

bushwhacker2k

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Jan 27, 2009
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Half are bad grammar issues (which are likely found all over the world, as opposed to being primarily an American problem), the other half are silly or just plain stupid things that only someone looking for things to hate would really find that big of a problem.

There are a few I agree with though, normalcy was totally pulled out of someone's ass and put in a presidential speech and now the dictionary just HAS to have it.
 

blankedboy

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Feb 7, 2009
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What a story, Britain.

Usually I'd be against the States in something like this, but honestly, does anyone actually care about anything but the last one? Yeesh.
 

CODE-D

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Feb 6, 2011
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Wow brits are real nitpickers.
I hope they dont mess their knickers while smoking a fag in the lou.
That wou' be bloody orrid tha would.
 

Varitel

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Jan 22, 2011
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Many Americans find maths to be awkward to say, so we use math as an alternative. Also, what the hell is a "regular Americano"? I have lived in the US all my life and I have never once heard that phrase used for any reason at all. Train station seems perfectly valid, as does shopping cart. "That'll learn ya" is only seriously used in specific regions of the US and it is used elsewhere because it is hilarious. I have never heard "two-time" or "three-time" used in the way described by the second person, "Oftentimes" is never one word, "Eaterie" has never been spelled with an "ie" in the US, and I had no idea that former prime minister Gordon Brown cared so much about our numerical idiosyncrasies. Also, I use "season" for TV when describing an American program, and "series" when describing a British programme. However, I agree zealously about "could care less" when used in place of "couldn't care less".
 

Dusk17

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Jul 30, 2010
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This is what bugs me about grammar nazis, people seem to forget that language changes over time, and they get upset about it. All languages will change over time, slang will become so widely accepted that it becomes proper, new words are thought of, and others cease to be used in everyday language.
 

Abengoshis

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CODE-D said:
Wow brits are real nitpickers.
I hope they dont mess their knickers while smoking a fag in the lou.
That wou' be bloody orrid tha would.
Wrong. THOSE Brits are nitpickers. You're generalising all of us because of some people who speak up about what they hate.
 

airplanedude550

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Sep 5, 2010
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Finally, here is a topic that I can relate to. May I add to that list? As a Brit currently living in America (particularly a rural part of America), one pet peeve of mine is saying, "Ya'll" as opposed to "you all"...like as in "Ya'll come back now, ya' hear?" instead of "You all are welcomed back any time".
 

squeekenator

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Wait what? I wanted to be all reasonable-like and side with the poor, oppressed Americans who are being hated on by everyone, but how the buggery have so many people gone their entire lives without ever discovering that you're the only people who say 'zee'? I don't like it when people act like the ignorant American stereotype is true, but you're making it difficult to not support that opinion... Do Americans just not learn about the rest of the world?

(I'm finding it difficult to be SHOCKED AND APPALLED without sounding flame-ish. Please don't interpret this post as an attack.)
 

Apprentice88

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Jun 16, 2011
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Face it America, you couldn't care less regarding the colour of an Axe and fail to realise that it isn't English International, it's proper English.
 

Xangi

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Mar 4, 2009
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I would like to remind those who contributed to this list that even the "proper" English they claim to speak is a bastardized version of the original English language, and therefore they should shut up before their feet fly into their mouths at such speeds that their tongues are crushed beyond repair, making it so they can't even speak at all.
 

NoNameMcgee

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Feb 24, 2009
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I'm a brit and I do a lot of these things. But I also find other americanisms annoying. It's subjective lol
 

ImmortalDrifter

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Jan 6, 2011
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The grammar ones I can agree with, most of them sound like petty nit-picking though. The reactions are all gold though.

airplanedude550 said:
Finally, here is a topic that I can relate to. May I add to that list? As a Brit currently living in America (particularly a rural part of America), one pet peeve of mine is saying, "Ya'll" as opposed to "you all"...like as in "Ya'll come back now, ya' hear?" instead of "You all are welcomed back any time".
That's an accent, not an "americanism". Just as pronunciation differs slightly between areas Britian it differs in the U.S. as well. Here in the west,(as i am assuming you are in the south) you would be publicly mocked for saying "y'all".
 

Yukichin

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Mar 26, 2009
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A lot of these seem to be incredibly nitpicky, and just dislikes of general American English ways of speaking.

I agree with a lot of the grammar ones, though. But... people seriously use "deplane"? What on earth? It's almost as obnoxious as "dethaw"!
 

thathaloguy117

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Mar 17, 2011
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AverageJoe said:
I'm a brit and I do a lot of these things. But I also find other americanisms annoying. It's subjective lol
Why do Brits say "bugger" and "bloody hell" all the time? It makes no sense!!!
 

Max Ahriman

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Feb 3, 2011
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Try finding the coach station in glasgow. I asked about 5 people before i learned my lesson and asked for where the "big busses" are and got the answer straight away :(