Bisexuals: The Outcasts of Outcasts.

GoaThief

Reinventing the Spiel
Feb 2, 2012
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Images said:
I would be quite interested if furry rights are being oppressed!
I'd think so. In the UK a discrimination bill was passed which covers religious beliefs, race, nationality, sexual orientation (LGB)... the usual suspects in other words. However, around the time a female teenager was savagely beaten to death by a group of people purely because she was a goth and dared to be walking home with her boyfriend. Some alternative press such as Bizarre Magazine ran campaigns to have discrimination based on physical appearance to be included in the bill but politicians and much of the public at large would have none of it. Obviously the rights of anyone who looks different are of no concern to many, including groups who are discriminated against themselves, who should really know better. Instead of the unusual united grouping that saw religious people supporting gays and the like, people of alternative appearance were shunned.

I'd stake money on nearly every single person who looks different from society's norm (not just goths, but furries, hippys, transvestites, whomever) knows someone who has been abused emotionally or physically due to their appearance. Why is it that the legal system is not representing these groups equally? Things need to change.
 

Thaluikhain

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jboking said:
Ironic Pirate said:
Anyway, is it possible to be bi but not like gay sex? I'm attracted to guys and girls (leaning towards girls though) but don't like oral or anal sex. Speaking as a virgin though, the concept doesn't excite me.
Well, by definition, no. That is not possible. You are supposed to be sexually attracted to both men and women. If you find the image of a man appealing, but not sexually appealing, you are not bi. I'm not officially studied on the issue, though, so someone else might have a better answer for you.
Not exactly, you don't have to like the idea of physical intimacy, same as you can be celibate and straight.
 

LordFisheh

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Dec 31, 2008
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I blame the pathetic human need to find identity in everything. People won't settle for being gay (or straight), they need their hand held in being told that they're the 'right' kind of gay. And what better way to do that than create a wrong sort by co-opting another minority and making bisexuals into the enemy.
 

omega 616

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May 1, 2009
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To me there are 4 things you can be, straight, gay, into none or into both. There are no more camps, I know there are people who claim to be something else but it just sounds really nit picky to me.

Each group has as much right to be as any other.

I do feel there are a lot of people claiming to be bi that aren't, I know a girl who claims to be bi but during her 22 years of life hasn't done more than kiss a girl and these days girls kissing means fuck all ... plenty of girls are straight but have kissed plenty of other girls.

As for this "all people are a little bi" no, there not. I have absolutely no desire to have any kind of man on man action with any guy, I feel awkward shaking a guys hand. I have nothing against gay people, used to live with a couple of gay guys but it's not for me.

It's like saying everybody is a little bit asexual.
 

Ironic Pirate

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May 21, 2009
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jboking said:
Ironic Pirate said:
Anyway, is it possible to be bi but not like gay sex? I'm attracted to guys and girls (leaning towards girls though) but don't like oral or anal sex. Speaking as a virgin though, the concept doesn't excite me.
Well, by definition, no. That is not possible. You are supposed to be sexually attracted to both men and women. If you find the image of a man appealing, but not sexually appealing, you are not bi. I'm not officially studied on the issue, though, so someone else might have a better answer for you.
It's not that I don't find them sexually appealing, just that I don't like anal or oral sex. Don't like that with girls, either, it just doesn't appeal to me.
 

Rin Little

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Jul 24, 2011
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I'm a legit bi woman, and I've been fortunate not to run into this situation very often. In college my friends (hetero and homo) were thrilled for me that I was bi and that I could see both sides to their separate attractions. But honestly yes, it irritates me to no end that because of these stupid stereotypes and people doing it for attention, I'm taken less seriously by others in the LGBT community.
 

Not-here-anymore

In brightest day...
Nov 18, 2009
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Qitz said:
Also that there isn't a lot of known adult bisexuals (at least that I know of,) there are for gays and straights so the whole "It's just a faze" thing carries more justification to them.
I suspect that's due to people settling down with a single partner as they get older. There could be a lot of bi people out there who are happily in gay or straight relationships, leaving you with no reason whatsoever to assume that they are in fact bisexual.

jboking said:
Edit: I really wish there was someone in here that agrees with/could better defend the treatment of bisexuals in gay communities. I really want to better understand that side of this issue more.
I don't think there's a legitimate argument in favour of their treatment. It's just a number of prejudices coming out. Some of them will be assumed to be bi for the attention, some will be assumed to be gay but not willing to admit to it, and some will be assumed to be straight but there to try and get with the ones who are 'bi for the attention'. There's also possibly some bitterness, given that anyone with a broader spectrum of attraction can (should they choose to) avoid the negative attention that homosexuality sadly attracts.

Very few people seem to be willing to admit that bisexual people actually exist - that's horrendous in society as a whole, but so much worse coming from a group that has been discriminated against forever.
 

Gmans uncle

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Oct 17, 2011
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Okay, let me try and display my thoughts in the best way I can...

I'm Bisexual
Allow me to say something to those who honestly think that we are "clamoring for attention" or that it "doesn't really exist"...

I am defiantly Bi
how do I know I'm not really just gay or strait?
Well, for a long time I thought I was strait, then I found myself physically attracted to a male for the first time (or at least the first time I would admit it to myself) when I was around 15. At first I dismissed it as an isolated incident, thinking I was just confused or something, but after similar things kept happening repeatedly I couldn't deny it anymore, this attraction I was feeling, this was real, there was no way I was strait, and for a time I just thought I was gay. But then I realized that all those times I was attracted to women in the past, those where real as well, I couldn't honestly say that that was all fake or just me conforming to what I thought my orientation was. So I put two and two together and concluded that I was Bisexual with a slight male slant and then, even with all of that worked out, I didn't get the nerve up to come out for almost another 2 years.
I ask you,
Had I been doing this for attention, why would I wait 2 bloody years to do it?
If it doesn't exist, than how do you explain the genuine physical attraction I feel to both sexes?
Bisexuality is real
just as real as homosexuality
just as real as heterosexuality
I'm living proof.
 

jboking

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Oct 10, 2008
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.No. said:
What would asexuals be? The outcasts of outcasts of outcasts?
I don't think outcasts consider themselves to be part of the LGBT groups. They consider themselves wholly other. It would be more appropriate to just call them outcasts as opposed to outcasts of outcasts of outcasts, as it implies they belong categorically to two other groups.
 

ABAP

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Feb 4, 2012
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Does anyone ever treat asexuals poorly? The worst crap I ever get for being ostensibly uninterested in girls (because I'm not out as gay to most) is people joking about how I'm going to end up being The 40 Year Old Virgin, but I haven't felt the sting of oppression over it or anything.

I've had people I trusted well enough to tell them I was gay stop talking to me for having done so, on the other hand.

Not to turn the discussion into a contest for determining who has it the worst; point being, I don't think asexuals are the outcasts of the outcasts of the outcasts.
 

Asuka Soryu

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Jun 11, 2010
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People naturally fear and hate what they don't understand, it's kind of funny (in a tragic sense) that homosexuals, who have been shunned and hated upon, 'cause of their sexuality would do the same thing to bisexuals and not realise the hypocricy.

I myself don't give a damn what your sexuality is. Your life, your choices, they don't effect me, so why should I care what you do?
 

Shavon513

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Apr 5, 2010
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I feel reluctant to tell people of my bisexuality, because people perceive us as confused, saying it for the attentions, promiscuous or whatever. There are many who say that, especially as teens, just for the attention, or they are curious, which is fine. But if an adult self-identifies as bisexual, people should back off and let them be without attributing all of the stereotypes to them.

Realistically, I think orientation is a spectrum, but that may ruffle a few feathers. :p
 

ZeroMachine

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Oct 11, 2008
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(DISCLAIMER: I'm a relentless supporter of GLBT rights, but I'm straight and I've only been to a very few actual GLBTA meetings, usually just to hang out and watching funny/good movies, and only in one place.)

I haven't seen that.

In the GLBTA at my college, no only are bisexuals excepted as much as everyone else, but a bisexual (one of my best friends) works there and runs many functions. They love her.
 

LilithSlave

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Sep 1, 2011
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There are both advantages and disadvantages to being a bisexual in comparison to just being homosexual.

For starters, we get homophobia, but sometimes less than actual gay people because we sort of "pass" for sorta heterosexual in people's eyes. Heck, some biphobia is straight people thinking we're not attracted to the same sex, just trendy. To some of them, we're still nasty "faggots" and "queers", but to a smaller percentage, if slight. Since we're not "full gay", we're a little more comfortable to some of them.

But we still get plenty of homophobia, and plenty of people think we're nasty fags and dykes.

But we're also not accepted very well in the LGBT community. Not as much as we should be. Many gays and lesbians will not date a bisexual and claim that bisexuals do not exist. There is a heavy distrust for bisexuals among many homosexuals.

It as if bisexuals are not truly welcome in either culture. Neither the heteronormative dominant culture, or the "gay culture".

As a bisexual, it only reinforces a feeling in me that I do not truly belong among anyone in anything. It's not a very happy feeling. That even in my sexuality, I do not even belong to or am accepted by a subculture, much less the dominant culture. It pushes me into a degree of forced individuality I'm not super comfortable with. I'd at least LGBT to be more inclusive of the B folks. It's not like I'm any less pro-gay than any gay person.

To a degree, I understand their feelings. Homosexuals are so persecuted, and finally work up a sense of worth and belonging and even a culture and consciousness. And suddenly bisexuals come in like it's no big deal, appearing to be much more happily in the closet than gay people, and being attracted to the gender they never were able to, accepted by society. When homosexuals have killed themselves because they never could be attracted to the opposite sex, even though they wished to. It must feel so... trivializing to some people.

But it still hurts.
 

Rottweiler

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Jan 20, 2008
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Part of it is the fact that your sexuality shouldn't be who you are. All the things we *do* aren't what we *are*, but frankly too many people don't realize this.

I knew a man for five years, and when he finally mentioned he was bisexual, a lot of people demanded to know why he hadn't mentioned it previously. His comment? "Why would I mention it? I'm not 'a bisexual'. I'm a guy named Bill, I work as a mechanic. The fact that I'm bisexual has nothing to do with who I am."

And he's right.