could sainsburys single handledly kill the games shops?

Textbook Bobcat

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Sexual Harassment Panda said:
I hope it's true. Not because I particularly want the game...I just like the idea that it is a big "fuck you" to activision. They RRP'd the game at £60, seriously...fuck 'em.
They still get the same money by selling it to Sainsbury's, it's more of a "fuck you" to all games retailers.

Clever technique, gets people in the store, therefore increasing the likelihood they do their weekly shopping - that day and more to come.
 

faselei

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Supermarkets did exactly the same to books when they refused to abide by the Net agreement. Book shops are still doing (quite) well, so there's room for competition. As fix-the-spade said, its probably a 'loss leader' which means they aim to entice you in, maybe you'll switch from Tescos or whatever :p
 

CrysisMcGee

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I've seen this before. Sometimes places will sell games at cost when they are having a special. It won't last long, so take advantage of it.
 

GamingAwesome1

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If they keep it up they'll get the crap sued out of them. Then all will reuturn to normal.

Sainsbury's sucks anyway......I've always been more of an Tesco kind of guy.
 

SirCannonFodder

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faselei said:
Supermarkets did exactly the same to books when they refused to abide by the Net agreement. Book shops are still doing (quite) well, so there's room for competition. As fix-the-spade said, its probably a 'loss leader' which means they aim to entice you in, maybe you'll switch from Tescos or whatever :p
Wasn't there a story a while back that Tescos or some other supermarket was selling the 7th Harry Potter book for less than what regular bookstores could get them from the suppliers, so the bookstores were going into the supermarkets and buying up all the copies they could find, then selling them at their regular prices?
 

maddawg IAJI

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I don't see how this single day will kill the Game industry. They already paid for the copies,they can sell them for whatever they want.
 

Vanguard_Ex

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GamingAwesome1 said:
If they keep it up they'll get the crap sued out of them. Then all will reuturn to normal.

Sainsbury's sucks anyway......I've always been more of an Tesco kind of guy.
Same but like some kind of gaming whore I'm just going to use Sainsburys for this and then return to my usual Tesco patronage.
 

purplegothchick

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To be honest, I think that they are selling it that cheap to undercut game shops and obtain more custom. However, they will run out of the game very quickly if they are selling it that cheap, whereas the game stores are well aware of the extremely high demand for the title and are very well prepared. In the Gamestation where I work alone, we took delivery of over 1000 copies of the game, so I'd say we're better prepared for the release than, say, the Asda up the road.
 

woodsymoments

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everyone thinks the shops will be buying it at 60 quid but actually cos they buy in bulk they get it for less so the game shops always put it on the rrp because that way they make the most amount of profit
 

Randomologist

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If this brings any damage towards GAME etc, then (as far as I am concerned) they brought it on themselves. Sixty fucking pounds indeed, for a plastic box and a CD? Way to encourage piracy and market competition, Activision.
 

HotFezz8

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fix-the-spade said:
HotFezz8 said:
could sainsburys single handledly kill the games shops?
To put it bluntly, no.

Now for the explainy bit.

As far as Activision are concerned they most likely don't care, Sainsburys and all the other supermarkets will have bought the games from Activision at whatever price Activision was charging for trade sales. Activision have their money and what happens next is of minimal concern to them.

As for why they do it, it's partly because they can afford to. The Supermarkets have bought these games by the million and probably negotiated a good price with Activision based on that they would be the largest orders in the country (they will have orderd a LOT more copies than any of the game chain stores).

The main reason though is that they are not actually interested in selling MW2 (or any other blockbuster game, film or album) for much or any profit at all. What they want is to get you into their store, where they can sell you other things at a proper mark up. Think about it, most people going in to buy MW2 will buy it, then get some milk, or bottles of drink, or whatever else they realise they need to buy whilst they are there.
All these little extra sales from people they got into stores to buy MW2 will amount to an ernomous amount of money. Certainly more than the profit from selling MW2 at full price (with correspondingly lower sales and people through door numbers).

The big game shops and HMV will probably do this too, if they get you in with £50 for MW2 they can sell you MW2 cut price and CD's or whatever at full mark up. I expect there'll be at least one buy MW2 and get MW1 half price deal as well, there's going to be masses of people without the first buying the second.

As for damaging game stores, they've already been doing it for years and to an extent it has. There are much fewer independant game shops even than five years ago. There's two here (Loughborough), but besides Liverpool and London that's the most I've ever encountered in one town. None is the normal number now. Like with Butchers it'll probably kill of the weaker stores leaving only chains and the good specialists, which isn't necessarily a bad thing.

Gamers will keep buying from game stores, because they don't just buy the blockbusters, so to some extent or other specialist stores are going to survive.


Personally I think it's a win for consumers, it effectively kurb stomps Activision's and other publishers masive price fixing. In main stores it's probable MW2 will never sell for it's intended rrp, which can only be a good thing.
thanks for the info mate :) much appreciated
 

damselgaming

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Randomologist said:
If this brings any damage towards GAME etc, then (as far as I am concerned) they brought it on themselves. Sixty fucking pounds indeed, for a plastic box and a CD? Way to encourage piracy and market competition, Activision.
By the way, GAME are selling it for £45. I don't think anywhere is stupid enough to sell it for £60.
 

Jonesy911

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Well I know where I'm getting my copy,
I got Fallout 3 on release day for £27 in sainsburys
 

Randomologist

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nicole1207 said:
Randomologist said:
If this brings any damage towards GAME etc, then (as far as I am concerned) they brought it on themselves. Sixty fucking pounds indeed, for a plastic box and a CD? Way to encourage piracy and market competition, Activision.
By the way, GAME are selling it for £45. I don't think anywhere is stupid enough to sell it for £60.
Point taken, most have realised that a few bob short of the RRP means more sales. But I for one would love to see a competition war with the supermarkets, if it stops the blatant and greedy price fixing :/
 
Jul 23, 2008
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The stock will probably be very thin on the ground indeed. Supermarkets like Sainsbury's can do this because, even if they make a loss, which they will, some people might stay and continue shopping in their establishment.
Frankly, i think it's a good middle finger to anyone trying to sell MW2 for £50. Although i find myself not getting the least bit excited over the game... Either i'm dead inside or the massive amounts of hype and controversy have bled any enthusiasm i had for the game.
Charlie Brooker said, on Twitter, "S'alright. More I think about that airport bit the more I think Infinity Ward have lost their minds. I mean, really: way to set the public image of videogaming back a decade." And i fear he may be right.