EA Changes Origin Terms of Services, Forbids Class Action Lawsuits

Drakulea

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Feb 23, 2011
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It's like these corporate douches are begging us to hoist the Jolly Roger, if you know what I mean. What a bunch of greedy little f****.
 

Halceon

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Jan 31, 2009
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Hurray for living in the EU, wherein the EULA has no legal weight, because it is only presented to you after purchasing something. Now let's wait for the rest of the world to catch up and then we can think of moving this medium forward.

Also, after this news, if I choose to not install Origin, not only do i avoid this bullshit, but I also don't have to play EA's games. I call that a win-win situation.
 

Amaror

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Apr 15, 2011
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Most of the things said in the terms of service of any videogame aren't binding in the members of the European union.
One of the things, why i love living in europe...
 

kingmob

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Jan 20, 2010
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If people permit me to make this issue a bit broader. To be frank, it even shouldn't be a big problem to sue a company on your own instead of a group if you had sufficient reason. The fact that you can be right but it is so ridiculously expensive to be proven right that it'll never happen surely has to be a sign that society is rotten?
Also, waiving basic rights in a Eula for software that you don't even really want but are forced to use if you want to play a game? This REALLY has your supreme court's blessing? Exactly how corrupt is this system?
 

Orange Monkey

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Mar 16, 2009
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So us Europeans can still sue EA if we want to? But, do we, ever sue anything? I thought that was like an american hobby or something o_O
 

rsvp42

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Jan 15, 2010
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Whatever. What the hell do I care? Even if I use Origin, I'm probably never going to need to be a part of a class action lawsuit. My password leaks due to hacks? I change it. They try to take something I paid for? I complain like every American consumer until they give in because it's easier. Seriously, people are acting like THIS is the last straw? I don't know, maybe it's late, maybe I don't know all the issues, but I've never in my 24 years needed that kind of legal recourse and I doubt your average gamer has either. Even the Sony fiasco was just about making a point. Well, message received: we can't do class action stuff anymore.

Think about it: Sony took a huge PR hit because of the mess surrounding the PSN hack. The damage was done in those weeks of outage and the news stories about the losses. The class action lawsuit was an afterthought in terms of their reputation. That was a kick when they were already down. Now imagine something like that happens to EA. They will pay you back and make it up to you because anything less could ruin them completely (at least in terms of their digital sales strategy). The threat of a class action lawsuit won't make that happen any better or faster.
 

winter2

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Oct 10, 2009
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EA wtf? You almost had me convinced to just go ahead and get bf3 via Origin. Now I will not get either. I swear, it's like you hate my money or something.
 

acer840

(Insert Awesome Title)
Oct 21, 2020
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Australia
Is this still a legally binding agreement now? I thought that basic rights cannot be waved by a single mouse click. First they give themselves the right to snoop through your computer, next they make you play in their playground by 'waving the right to sue by trial of jury or class action'. Any other time someone puts this in your face it would be shot down and laughed at in seconds, but to play Battlefield 3, you have to agree to wave basic legal rights.

I don't get it. The EULA itself should be looked at again by governments to make sure these are not one sided. I can understand protecting their interests and IP's but to the point of treating Customers as possible thieves is crazy. Damn EA, your aiming that gun at your foot again, and you lost a customer on this one.
 

Denamic

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Aug 19, 2009
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By accepting this brick through your window, you waive all your rights to pursue legal action against the thrower of this brick.
 

Strazdas

Robots will replace your job
May 28, 2011
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first they made outrageous claims in their TOS. they got them retracted. now they make more. Frankly, how often do you see a guy sueing a company for breaking of TOS? I personally see that like never.

makes me wonder about all those thousands of hellish-lenght TOS i skipped though. i understand when its something like 2 page TOS, thats fine, but when you could use the space to write a book and still have some left over, and it doesn't say anything more than the one with 2 pages lenght, its really life-wasting experience to read.

On the other hand, Go EU. I still got my sueing rights.

QUESTION: Do I need an origin account to play EA games on xbox360 and ps3?
Answer: you need origin to paly BF3 on any form of gaming device. Other games - no, not yet.
 

qeinar

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Jul 14, 2009
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Ser Imp said:
Seems a bit incongruous for a company who's tagline is challenge everything
haha nice one.

Also this isn't going to stop me from playing bf3, it's not like i'm planning to sue anyways. : p
 

Twad

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Nov 19, 2009
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Right.. just because they write it down on their OTS doesnt make them above the law. Stupid EA.
 

Siege_TF

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May 9, 2010
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Capitalism at the expence of individual capitolists is a long-standing tradition in North America, and has to be beaten down with blood, sweat, and bribery. 'Let The Buyer Beware' was legally enforceable in both countries when consumers bought anything at all dangerous until quite recently when a stove exploded and killed a small family. Or maybe it was just one or two of them. I only vaguely recall it from my criminology class years ago.

It continues today, though it's your rights (hello, patriot act) rather than you're saftey you need to beware of.
 

Freeze_L

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Feb 17, 2010
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you know, i am not sure if you can give up your constitutional rights. I mean you can choose not to use them ya, but you can't sign them away like that. I mean, you can't decide to sell yourself into slavery by making a legal document and signing it, that would be illegal and not held up anywhere in the US. So why would you be able to waive another constitutional right in the same manner?

Am I right? is there someone on these forums with actual knowledge of the law who could explain to me how in the hell this is legal?