Has a fanbase ever turned you off of watching something?

EternallyBored

Terminally Apathetic
Jun 17, 2013
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As many others have already stated, no, a fanbase has never turned me away from watching or playing a piece of media in and of itself. The most a fanbase has ever done is stop me from participating in the fanbase itself which isn't exactly hard since 99% of the media I consume, I don't have the time to participate in the fanbase anyway, so it's kind of moot.

Honestly, there aren't even any fandoms I truly hate, slightly annoyed by, sure, but that's about it. I've never encountered these totally unavoidable fans that people seem to think are everywhere. As long as you don't insult their favored property and spark an attempted debate, I have yet to encounter a super fan that won't take no for an answer and leave you the hell alone.
 

Ihateregistering1

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Mar 30, 2011
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It wasn't necessarily the fanbase that turned me off of it, but people praised "Breaking Bad" so much that I didn't really want to watch it because I knew that there was no way in hell it was actually going to be that good. I eventually did get around to watching it and it is definitely an excellent show, but I didn't think it was the 2nd coming like so many people acted like it was.

The only one that I've come a LITTLE close on is UFC. I love MMA, keep up with it, and love watching the fights, but I went to a bar once to watch the fight on Pay-Per-View, and holy crap, after that I almost never wanted to say I was a UFC fan for fear of association. The bar was filled to the brim with loud, obnoxious, morbidly obese, wanna-be tough guys wearing "Affliction" t-shirts that were a size too small, and were all drunk off their ass by about round two of the 2nd fight.

Pay-per-view at home might be expensive as hell, but it's worth it to not have to deal with that again.
 

Demonjazz

Sexually identifies as Tiefling
Sep 13, 2008
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Azure23 said:
Can I ask a question of any Bronies (or just fans of the show) here?

And I'd like to preface this with the firm statement that I am absolutely NOT coming from a place of malice, insincerity, or any of that garbage, I'm genuinely interested and curious.

What do you enjoy about the show? I've seen a couple episodes of Adventure Time and personally thought that there was an edge of subversive humor and visual jokes that only older viewers would get (the numerous DnD references and the Title Logo being a spoof of Conan's are good examples of this). I also caught one episode of friendship is magic when babysitting my younger cousin. It seemed (and I don't doubt that there are story lines and continuity and all that) like a simple, boilerplate children's cartoon with a good message and well designed appeal to very young girls and boys (because people who say a show is unilaterally for one sex or the other are stupid).

So I guess to focus my question more; I did not understand the appeal of it to an older audience and I'd be genuinely interested to hear more about it. Does it have thematic material that an adult could appreciate isn't so much my question (because it obviously does, given the phenomenon surrounding it), but more "what is that material?" My younger cousin looks up to me and I'd like to have more to talk about with her, so if this is a show that I can watch and enjoy then I'll definitely give it a shot. Looking forward to responses.
I think the one of the main things that got people to watch it is that no body expected it to be good when it first came on. Like imagine if for instance say a director that's hated like Micheal Bay all of a sudden just made this hilarious, well characterized, fairly good all around movie completely out of nowhere. Or perhaps something a more appropriate metaphor would Barbie or the Bratz did that. My Little Pony has kind of had the reputation of being this bland saccharine sweet series that's pretty much shilled out to kids without any quality control.
Of course what I think keeps people coming back is the characters cause they're very relatable and seem like people you would know. I think every knows somebody like Twilight for instance. A workaholic who often distances her self from people due to work but of course has many of the positive traits of a workaholic such as being a good leader, good work drive, etc, etc. Or how about Pinkie Pie, who plays that friend of yours who is always cracking a joke, always trying to help everyone but in the process often gets carried away and can at times be offensive cause they often just let their eccentricities run wild. That and the writing is funny. They have a chimera who is going to eat one of our tertiary protagonists... After they eat all of your pies that you were transporting. Or how about pretty much half of what Pinkie Pie does. Heck even when Pinkie Pie is having a mental breakdown she's funny just people talking to inanimate objects is hilarious, especially when they talk back in their mind. That and his motherfucking laser battles! And Super Powered Ponies that also shoot lasers and they had a bunch of references to comic books! And they got really catchy good songs!
 

RedDeadFred

Illusions, Michael!
May 13, 2009
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Not quite. However, I did only watch 2 episodes because I think it's fanbase had hyped it up so much that I ended up being quite disappointed with it. I didn't find any of the characters particularly interesting (or well acted for that matter).
 

SilverBullets000

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Apr 11, 2012
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No. Never. Fanbases may act stupid and repulsive from time to time, but they're usually the vocal minority. Besides that, they have nothing to do with the quality of the product they rave about. Why would I miss out on something I could potentially enjoy because some asshole unrelated to me in any other way is being a dick on the internet?
[sub][sub]Honestly, anti-(fandom)s annoy me more, but whatever.[/sub][/sub]
 

FPLOON

Your #1 Source for the Dino Porn
Jul 10, 2013
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Hmmmm... This is kinda a tough one for me... mostly because it's never a fanbase that would make me not watch a particular show in question, but more or less on the grounds of a show interesting me on its own merits... In fact, I sometimes feel sorry for those that didn't get into a particular show without someone from its [respected] fanbase showing it to them because there's probably a sense of bias in terms of showing the show off in general... But, I digress...

Anyway, there has never been a fanbase that has turned me off from any show I choose not to watch... which is just another way for me to say "I'll wait until all of the episodes from that particular season of the [anime] series in question comes out so that I can marathon through it back-to-back, especially if it's heavily story-based and/or heavily character-driven..." Besides, I rarely know about a show's supposed "fanbase" until someone points it out to me afterwords... (like with MLP:FiM back in 2011...)
 

Chaos Isaac

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Jun 27, 2013
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Evangelion. Portal.

The former reason has been stated prior then myself in like a million ways. The latter 'cause whatever I already got the god damn joke internet.
 

Coruptin

Inaction Master
Jul 9, 2009
258
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gurren laggan
kill la kill
attack on titan
transformers: windblade

here's a tip, if you love something, dont be afraid of admitting how dumb it can be. nothing
turns off people more than rabid zealotry.

edit: oops forgot madoka magica
 

SuperSuperSuperGuy

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Jun 19, 2010
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Most specific fanbases are pretty intolerable. The fact that they section themselves off like that is in and of itself kinda repulsive, like the works of fiction they like define them or they're only allowed to like a certain number of specific (usually quite limited) things. However, the main thing that I dislike about fanbases is how... blindly obsessive they seem to be. Take, for example, the "fandoms" I've seen on Tumblr. Most people who post on tags and stuff do so with little to no prudence, with quality posts offering interesting information or ideas or high-quality fan works being few and far between. "Headcanons" and stuff like that permeate these fanbases, as well. For those unfamiliar with the term, "headcanon" is basically the fandom version of "I reject your reality and substitute my own" with regards to actual, established canon, combined with an extreme helping of wild speculation. You can see how that would be annoying.

That being said, however, I've never been turned off by a fanbase, exactly. I tend to avoid fanbases of all kind, but I like to watch or play something before inspecting the community. That way, I can't really be spoiled by the fanbase and can form my own opinions of things. There have been cases where I became more disinterested in something that I was disinterested in in the first place due to the fanbase, i.e. Call of Duty and any-and-all MOBAs.

Basically, a bad fanbase doesn't ruin a game or series for me, but it does discourage me from interacting with people. I, personally, LOVE Monster Hunter and various fighting games, but I hate interacting with "hardcore" fans because they can be extremely volatile.
 

busterkeatonrules

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Azure23 said:
Can I ask a question of any Bronies (or just fans of the show) here?

And I'd like to preface this with the firm statement that I am absolutely NOT coming from a place of malice, insincerity, or any of that garbage, I'm genuinely interested and curious.

What do you enjoy about the show? I've seen a couple episodes of Adventure Time and personally thought that there was an edge of subversive humor and visual jokes that only older viewers would get (the numerous DnD references and the Title Logo being a spoof of Conan's are good examples of this). I also caught one episode of friendship is magic when babysitting my younger cousin. It seemed (and I don't doubt that there are story lines and continuity and all that) like a simple, boilerplate children's cartoon with a good message and well designed appeal to very young girls and boys (because people who say a show is unilaterally for one sex or the other are stupid).

So I guess to focus my question more; I did not understand the appeal of it to an older audience and I'd be genuinely interested to hear more about it. Does it have thematic material that an adult could appreciate isn't so much my question (because it obviously does, given the phenomenon surrounding it), but more "what is that material?" My younger cousin looks up to me and I'd like to have more to talk about with her, so if this is a show that I can watch and enjoy then I'll definitely give it a shot. Looking forward to responses.
Personally, I watch the show because I enjoy character-driven comedy. MLP delivers this in spades. We get a fairly large ensemble cast (the 'Mane 6', because bronies are big on horse-based puns), each with distinct personalities and quirks which can play against each other in a multitude of ways depending on which two or three characters are currently in the spotlight.

The dynamic relationship between the cast also adds an extra dimension to the occasional episode in which the whole gang is working towards a common coal (see Dragonshy), or where one character is clearly bothered by something while the others are attempting to figure out how best to help (Applebuck Season, Dressed for Success).

Simply put, the Mane 6 are a fun bunch and I enjoy watching their antics and adventures.

That said, I'm pretty sure you can ask fifty bronies why they like the show, and get AT LEAST fifty different answers - so why not simply try and watch a couple of episodes with your cousin and see if you can't find your OWN reason?
 

Elvis Starburst

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Azure23 said:
Can I ask a question of any Bronies (or just fans of the show) here?

And I'd like to preface this with the firm statement that I am absolutely NOT coming from a place of malice, insincerity, or any of that garbage, I'm genuinely interested and curious.

What do you enjoy about the show? I've seen a couple episodes of Adventure Time and personally thought that there was an edge of subversive humor and visual jokes that only older viewers would get (the numerous DnD references and the Title Logo being a spoof of Conan's are good examples of this). I also caught one episode of friendship is magic when babysitting my younger cousin. It seemed (and I don't doubt that there are story lines and continuity and all that) like a simple, boilerplate children's cartoon with a good message and well designed appeal to very young girls and boys (because people who say a show is unilaterally for one sex or the other are stupid).

So I guess to focus my question more; I did not understand the appeal of it to an older audience and I'd be genuinely interested to hear more about it. Does it have thematic material that an adult could appreciate isn't so much my question (because it obviously does, given the phenomenon surrounding it), but more "what is that material?" My younger cousin looks up to me and I'd like to have more to talk about with her, so if this is a show that I can watch and enjoy then I'll definitely give it a shot. Looking forward to responses.
I'd pretty much chalk it up to good dialogue, humor, animation, characters, voice actor quality, and over-all enjoyment of the episodes they bring. I love this show. I've re-watched it all at least twice before season 4 hit. It's just a very great quality show that can be enjoyed by people of many different audiences. It doesn't have to be just for kids. It's just a damn solid show~

OT: Eh, just fandoms in general. I'm not a fan of hype for shows from a group. They don't make me wanna watch them more than my actual normal level of interest. Now, in regards to the above I just made... I don't think I'd have been so welcoming to MLP if I knew how bad the brony community was before I started. I simply heard it was good from some friends who nagged me to watch it. Nowe, just... eugh. It's a bit of a mess, I admit
 

Blow_Pop

Supreme Evil Overlord
Jan 21, 2009
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Dark Souls
John Green books (though the author has had his fair share in turning me off from his books too)
MLP (the new series, not the one I grew up with and loved in the 80s)
Supernatural
Sherlock
Call of Duty
Halo
World of Warcraft
Homestuck
steam powered giraffe (music fandom)
Hannibal
Anything starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman, Jared Paladecki, Jensen Ackles, or Misha Collins
the k-pop fandom

I'm sure there's more but those are the worst I've come across so far. And for the longest time XBox fanboys kept me away from the XBox because let's face it, some of them are fucking scary and creepy as shit
 

SilverBullets000

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TopazFusion said:
I'm really bad a video games. I still enjoy playing them, but I'm not very good at playing them. Which means I often have to resort to using the lower difficulty settings.
But for some reason, the Dark Souls fanbase seemed to think that anyone who needs an 'easy mode' isn't worthy of playing their game.

Such a friendly and welcoming fanbase, that one.
Not that I want to prove you right, but the best justification I've heard for this is that the difficulty is supposed to augment the story. That is to say that the land of Lordran is a place where brave knights meet their end and gods choose madness to cling to their bygone age. The difficulty is a way of feeling those aspects of the story and wouldn't feel the same if one could just scale down the difficulty.

Then again, I highly doubt the people you talk about use that justification as much as they just tell you to get gud. Too bad, since it is actually a good point. [sub][sub]Then again, you could argue that Dark Souls isn't the best at storytelling anyway, but the point still stands.[/sub][/sub]
 

JagermanXcell

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Oct 1, 2012
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Nope.
I started watching Game of Thrones knowing full well the fans were psychos. I'm mid way through season two, so usually by now the fanbase "should have ruined it for me"... nope. Nothing yet. Quality is still there...

So let me just flip the thread around and go to a fanbase that actually got me into loving a show. Specifically Jojo's.
Man, the fanbase has such a love hate relationship with Jojo, it's beautiful. One second they're having a blast shouting their WRRRYYYYs and loving Part 4, and the next second they're talking about how broken certain stands are and how sh*t of a character Part 3 Jotaro is.

A fanbase that knows their show is crap but still smoother in it with joy and enthusiasm. Can we have more of those please?
 

Captain Trek

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Azure23 said:
Can I ask a question of any Bronies (or just fans of the show) here?

And I'd like to preface this with the firm statement that I am absolutely NOT coming from a place of malice, insincerity, or any of that garbage, I'm genuinely interested and curious.

What do you enjoy about the show? I've seen a couple episodes of Adventure Time and personally thought that there was an edge of subversive humor and visual jokes that only older viewers would get (the numerous DnD references and the Title Logo being a spoof of Conan's are good examples of this). I also caught one episode of friendship is magic when babysitting my younger cousin. It seemed (and I don't doubt that there are story lines and continuity and all that) like a simple, boilerplate children's cartoon with a good message and well designed appeal to very young girls and boys (because people who say a show is unilaterally for one sex or the other are stupid).

So I guess to focus my question more; I did not understand the appeal of it to an older audience and I'd be genuinely interested to hear more about it. Does it have thematic material that an adult could appreciate isn't so much my question (because it obviously does, given the phenomenon surrounding it), but more "what is that material?" My younger cousin looks up to me and I'd like to have more to talk about with her, so if this is a show that I can watch and enjoy then I'll definitely give it a shot. Looking forward to responses.
I can't speak to your specific experience because you didn't specify what episode you watched, but one of the first and most important things to note about FiM is that it is a highly varied show. Not only does the content vary widely (having done everything from your completely bog-standard sleepover catastrophe type story right up to doing full-force parodies of Mad Men and Dragonball Z), meaning there are some episodes that inherently won't interest everyone, but the quality does also, to such an extent that even those within the fandom itself rarely universally agree how good one given episode actually is. FiM is a show of higher highs and lower lows than the typical TV show, which owes to the fact that FiM generally takes more risks than its contemporaries. As such, I feel you need to watch several different episodes (I suggest looking up the episode listings and picking a few that, based on their descriptions, seem like interesting stories to you) to have a fuller picture of how the show actually works and thus whether or not you like it. This is quite different to a formulaic show like Phineas and Ferb, where any one episode is generally interchangeable with another, or Gravity Falls, which generally maintains a consistent standard throughout its run, hitting neither the highest highs of FiM 'nor it's lowest lows. There are certainly a few episodes that drop the ball and wind up telling a generic, boilerplate story any children's show would tell, such as Look Before You Sleep and it's entirely possible you caught one of these. They are, thankfully, the exception. The majority of the content is far more interesting.

Beyond that, though, as others have said, there is a wide variety (varied show, varied reasons to like it) of reasons why people like the show specfically. Let me address some of the bigger ones:


Voice acting and sound direction:

The voice acting is first class, which is no surprise when it is being headlined by industry juggernaughts such as Tara Strong (Raven from the Teen Titans), being guided by directors that don't breathe through their noses. Every character has a unique sound and every character is a pleasure to listen to... even the young ones. There are so, so, SO many cartoons whose characters are nothing short of torturous to listen to, especially when trying to make child characters sound like children. FiM is quite possibly the only show in existence to make a squeaky-voiced child adorable rather than annoying. The rest of the show's sound design is of high quality as well, with background music that is thematic and never distracting and actual songs (as in, songs sung by the characters) that were written with care and attention to ensure that they actually work as music in their own right and are more than just noise intended to fill space. Indeed, fair warning now, this theme of actually caring about what they were doing is going to repeat itself pretty much ad-nauseum throughout this dissertation...


Art direction:

This is heavily debated point, but none-the-less worth addressing. Some people find the flash animated art style lacklustre, but I personally happen to believe that what we are given in FiM is slick, stylish and polished, especially in the amount of effort and detail that goes into the background objects and movement. What other show is going to give you two young ladies randomly flirting in the background of a shot before they are interrupted by the town idiot suddenly popping out of the well all while the actual episode continues to occur in the foreground? The broad, bright colour palette does a fine job of bringing across the cheerful tone of life and adventures in Equestria (compared with Gravity Falls' darker, more subdued palette that does an excellent show of lending events in that show an appropriate air of mystery. By the way, Gravity falls is also awesome and you should check that out too) and is just eye-catching in its own right. When the big "event" moments happen (in the beginning and end of season two-parters) and even just at other semi-arbitrary moments (again, the show is variable in almost all its aspects), the general pleasant-too-look-at standard of animation crosses over into being truly gorgeous. You'll know these moments when you see them.


Characters:

This is a point several others have already addressed, but it bears worth expanding upon. The original creator of the series, Lauren Faust, brought to the show a number of ideas from her own personal project that never got the green light. This project, named Galaxy Girls, specified as its highest priority that it would show the audience that there was more than just one way to "be a girl", wherein each of the main cast members (six girls in all, as you might imagine) would be a unique character with a personality highly distinguishable from the rest of the cast. This requirement has been retained in FiM, and the result is one of the most diverse and relateable casts in a cartoon in recent memory. Compare this to the MLP specials of the early to mid noughties, where it is essentially impossible to tell many of the characters apart. Each character can be broadly placed within a given archetype, but each has their ambitions, strengths, shortcomings and limits that have been gradually expanded upon over time . Rainbow Dash in particular has undergone some of the most impressive character development I've ever seen in a cartoon (yes, the characters actually grow and change. They are not static like in many cartoons). Not only that, but several of the supporting characters too have had their characters filled in and expanded upon, including one who manages to be dynamic and interesting whilst having spoken fewer words throughout the entire series than are contained in this paragraph.


Writing:

FiM, in the first place, is not a show that talks down to its audience. This is an extremely important point. As has been stated, this is a show that has tackled the subject of disability more than once and passed this particular test with flying colours. But even in a more general sense, the show trusts its audience to recall plot details (The world-building that goes on is, as someone else pointed out, truly impressive at times, painting a colourful picture of a living, breathing world rather than just having everything revolve around one static, unchanging town sitting in a cartoon void), understand subtleties and to stay invested without having to jingle the proverbial keys for attention every five seconds. This philosophy that kids are NOT idiots allows the writers to pace themselves and tell the stories they want to tell, which is why they were able to get away with having an episode that investigates learning styles theory. This lack of limitations has its downsides as well, of course, but overall I'd say the diversity of content and quality is a net positive, both because there are far more good episodes than bad ones and because it means there's something for everyone (how about an episode that serves as a better 4th Indiana Jones film than Kingdom of the Crystal Skull? Yup, there's an ep. for that... AND a follow-up ep. for that...).


A positive alternative:

Through my own investigations, I have come to suspect that no small portion of the FiM fanbase (myself included) consists of disenfranchised science fiction fans who haven't had anything good to watch since Stargate: Atlantis went off the air. Television these days is absolutely steeped in what is known as "grimdark" (grim characters that are utterly irredeemable and a dark setting that is utterly beyond help), even in its cartoons and its polar opposite, known as "noblebright" (think Star Trek, particularly The Next Generation, as perhaps the Most Triumphant Example), has been marginalised on TV to the point where a show like FiM coming along and saying, "Hey, you know what? We actually CAN have nice things" is a breath of fresh air. Indeed, contrary to what others have said about the presence of douchebags within the fandom keeping then away from the show (EVERY fandom has douchebags, and remember that it's always the biggest idiots that carry the loudest megaphones. The Silent Majority, whilst a cliche concept, does exist and they are almost invariably good people), I would aruge that the show has had a positive effect. Sad though it might seem, there are many individuals well into their formative years and beyond who never were really taught the right ways to behave in a way that was digestible to them, and I have seen first-hand the positive impact the show's messages of friendship and tolerance have had on some of these individuals. In particular, I remember when a talk-back radio host in America accused Bronies of being paedophiles, the response on the primary FiM fansite was overwhelmingly a call NOT to attack the radio show's forums or otherwise backlash angrily against them because, and I am quoting here, "That's not what Twilight would want us to do".


Fan works:

If the show itself is diverse and varied in its content and quality, the works of the fanbase are even moreso. A great many Bronies got their start with fanmade content and whilst there is, as with anything on the internet, plenty of garbage, the remaining 1% really, truly is worth dying for. Whether you love art, music (I particularly recommend Eurobeat Brony's remix of "Discord"), written stories or just wish there was more FiM cartoon to watch (not even joking about that last part. There are show-quality fan-made episodes of the show), there is some truly great stuff to suit every taste to be had if only you're willing to look for it (or you just look at the famous stuff that has the most critical acclaim from the community).


They did it for themselves:

If there's one piece of my mother's wisdom I've completely internalised, it's that the truly talented children's production studios and individuals (such as Don Bleuth or Pixar in their prime) can be said to have (quite apparently) done what they did for themselves first and for the target audience second. With only the minimum amount of corporate meddling on the part of Hasbro (seriously, the degree to which they've taken a hands-off approach to this production is truly commendable), Lauren Faust and the extremely talented crew she assembled were able to make the show they wanted to make... what they wanted to see appear on the screen... So in one way of looking at it, the show was made by adults (individuals who love the animation industry, love cartoons and love to tell stories) for adults. It might seem a little pompous for a Brony to place FiM on the same "fun for all the family" pedestal as the works of Bleuth and Pixar, but taking into account the inherent differences between a televised cartoon and an animated film, I do think the comparison is a valid one because they came about in much the same way... by letting the cartoonists do what they do best without trying to pander to what some suit thinks will sell the most toys... And I do honestly believe that a similar amount of heart and soul (if not budget) has gone into FiM as goes into a Pixar film and that it shows in the final work, lending a certain endearing quality that something that was made purely for a pay-check could never have.


I hope that helps contextualise things a little. As I said somewhere above, I'd recommend going to the episode list (feel free to include all four seasons. The show can be watched out of order for the most part), picking out a handful episodes with intriguing looking synopses and having a go. If you still don't like it then, that's fair enough (despite my own insistence that the show has something for everyone, which it does, not everyone is going to like enough of it to want to stay for the full course).
 

Twintix

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Uh, Frozen, actually.

Not so much because I think that the fanbase is rabid, but because that I'm afraid it might suffer from Hype Backlash. I keep hearing that this movie is supposedly some kind of masterpiece, and I just don't want to be disappointed. I'm picky enough when it comes to movies as it is.

Mostly, though, I try to not let fanbases sour my opinion of something. The reason I couldn't finish the first Game of Trones book wasn't because of its fanbase, but because it bored me to tears. This was before watching even one minute of the TV series, by the way. (Which I still haven't done)
 

ExDeath730

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SilverBullets000 said:
TopazFusion said:
I'm really bad a video games. I still enjoy playing them, but I'm not very good at playing them. Which means I often have to resort to using the lower difficulty settings.
But for some reason, the Dark Souls fanbase seemed to think that anyone who needs an 'easy mode' isn't worthy of playing their game.

Such a friendly and welcoming fanbase, that one.
Not that I want to prove you right, but the best justification I've heard for this is that the difficulty is supposed to augment the story. That is to say that the land of Lordran is a place where brave knights meet their end and gods choose madness to cling to their bygone age. The difficulty is a way of feeling those aspects of the story and wouldn't feel the same if one could just scale down the difficulty.

Then again, I highly doubt the people you talk about use that justification as much as they just tell you to get gud. Too bad, since it is actually a good point. [sub][sub]Then again, you could argue that Dark Souls isn't the best at storytelling anyway, but the point still stands.[/sub][/sub]
The reason i wasn't able to get in Dark Souls is because for me...The hype was just misleading.

Really, the players should say that it's only hard if you grew up in the PS2/last gen era, because i remember when i played in the home of some friends. They have the PS3 version and i was curious about the game, so, i started playing. Just so you know, i had finished The Witcher 2 sometime before, and i was still in that game's mindset (you know, "use everything you have, always keep moving, don't turn your back to the enemy"), and i was throughly bored. It wasn't hard, i had some problems with the controls, but once i figured out it played like a slower Zelda game with more options right of the bat. I played for like 2, 3 hours and my friends were baffled...I hadn't died once, o knew when to pick my fights, when to run, etc...And i was bored by the game, because it didn't lived up to the hype. When you played NES, SNES and Mega Drive as a kid (like 6-11 years old), a game like Dark Souls is not particularly hard, so the charm is gone...And the storytelling in that game is horrible.

Aside from that...Breaking Bad and Doctor Who...And i'm almost giving up in Sherlock because of the fanbase, i actually like the show, except for the Moriarty, that i use to call "Joker light" or "Ineffective Kefka", because...Damn if he isn't stupid and boring.
 

Quoth

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There's been a few films I haven't watched because of their IMDB reviews. There's too much internet these days, it's easier not to read other peoples opinions.

I'll watch something on its own merit because the trailers look interesting. I'll give something a few episodes and if it doesn't hook me I'll turn off, even mid season. I think I got to S4 of Breaking Bad before I got tired of it.
 

PsychicTaco115

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Not really but I don't tell fans that I don't watch it/not interested in it

If I do, the pleading/coaxing/suggesting JUST WON'T STOP

I have to keep the mental barriers up to keep some sanity