How do you define your nationality?

Yojimzo

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Jul 3, 2012
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I'd say Irish American, lived in America my whole life, and I'm about 75% Irish.

Fairly simplistic but still.
 

Jake the Snake

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Mar 25, 2009
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I'm American and would define myself as an American. Sure, I feel a strong affinity toward my Scandinavian roots, and sometimes like to believe I'm actually Danish. But I'm not. I live in the U.S. and will probably for my whole life.
 

Smiley Face

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Jan 17, 2012
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I'm definitely more Canadian than anything. Born and raised in Canada, and on my dad's side, all the ancestors have been here since at least the 1800s, and some of those were Seneca, so that brings it back further. That said, Canada is a great mixture of cultures and heritages, so I feel justified in shifting it to Scots-Canadian - after all, my mother's Scottish, I grew up with a Scottish accent until it naturalized when I was... 7? 8? Not sure, but echoes of it still hang around, and I can pull it out when I want, I've spent a good deal of time with my family in Edinburgh, and I'm named Scott, so it's always had a deal to do with my identity.

So, I go for Scots-Canadian.
 

Saregon

Yes.. Swooping is bad.
May 21, 2012
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Aesir23 said:
Saregon said:
How easy would it be for someone who speaks English to get around? I've looked into learning Norwegian before but resources for doing so are kind of scarce in my city.
Very easy. Road signs (except for place-names) are international standard, and all Norwegians over the age of 10 speak English fairly well, and pretty much all adults are fluent (if not in pronunciation and such), so you will have no problems language-wise as long as you speak English. Also, pretty much all tourist destinations have info signs and such in Norwegian, English, French and German.
 

TehCookie

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Sep 16, 2008
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Your nationality is the nation you're a citizen of. If you have dual citizenship or immigrated you have more than one. As for me I'm American. Born and raised here and made of ethnic soup so I would consider my race to be American as well.
 

SidheKnight

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Nov 28, 2011
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I'm from Argentina, my grandparents were spanish and italian.

But I don't feel particularly strong ties to the country I was born in, I consider myself to be a citizen of the world.
 

hermes

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Mar 2, 2009
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I am Uruguayan or, as I like to call it for the geographically impaired people "that small country between Argentina and Brazil... the ones in the other America"

I don't have much to identify with in my country since its a relatively young and small country with no indigenous inheritage, so I had more in common with European immigrants and our neighbors than with other South American cultures.
 

verdant monkai

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Oct 30, 2011
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I was born a human male in Wales in a welsh town in a welsh suburb in a welsh hospital to welsh parents.

Therefore I am welsh, however I like to think of myself as also being British and European. I like the history of Europe and Britain, but when I am visiting anywhere in Europe I always say I am Welsh never British. This is because there is a surprising amount of hate for English people, but if you are Welsh people have either not heard of you or like you for not being English. Ireland is a good example of this the shared Celtic background of Wales and Ireland, give us more of a cultural understanding. Although to be honest everyone around the Britain area has the same culture, go out every Friday and Saturday night to get drunk angry and violent.
 

hooblabla6262

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Aug 8, 2008
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I'm a french-speaking Native American born in Canada. Never liked that term though, cause of the "American" part.

I suppose I could call myself an Indian, but that would be stupid and wrong.
I could say that I am Maliseet or First Nations, but nobody knows what I'm talking about.

I wish my people still had a place to call our home.
 

Psykoma

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Nov 29, 2010
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I'm Canadian.
Born in Alberta and Moved to Quebec when in my teens.
My father immigrated here from England in the 60s, my mom's family has been in prince edward island for generations, originally from France.

So I just say I'm Canadian, though when I'm peevish I'll also say that I'm entitled to be British.
 

ungothicdove

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Nov 30, 2007
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American with mostly Norwegian and Swedish heritage and some other stuff mixed in. I don't really know much about my ancestors though. It's something that I don't care about as far as my own identity is concerned, but I think it would be interesting to look in to and see how I ended up where I am.
 

Skeleon

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Nov 2, 2007
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German. Yeah, that's pretty much all there's to it.
I heard once that from one of my grandparents side I supposedly have some Italian in me but I don't really know or care.
 

Vanorae

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Oct 5, 2011
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I have Dutch parents. I was born and raised in the Netherlands. Most of my friends joke I was born in the wrong country, because of my love for English culture. That being said, I do consider myself 100 % Dutch. I would like to get out of here at some point in my life though. Not sure where to yet.
 

Goofguy

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Nov 25, 2010
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I'm 100% Canadian. My mother is French and my paternal grandfather was an Italian immigrant. I was born in Quebec and while French is my mother tongue, I self-identify primarily as a Canadian and secondarily as an Anglo-Quebecer.
 

Colour Scientist

Troll the Respawn, Jeremy!
Jul 15, 2009
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Stasisesque said:
I'm British.

My dad's Irish (that is, Eire, not N.I.) born but grew up in the east end of London, and considers himself more of a Londoner than an Irishman.
My mum's English born, Scottish descent.

I don't like claiming to be Irish because I wasn't born there, and I've never been. When asked, I will explain that my dad is Irish so I do have close ties to the Irish, but I am not. I can't really claim to be Scottish as the last pure Scot in my family was my great-grandmother, though I am also proud to be of Scottish descent. I suppose I am more truthfully English, but that denies my Scottish roots too much for my liking. So I am British for my mother's side's sake and my father's adopted-heritage.

I do like having an Irish dad, though. It's amazing how many people treat the Irish like some magical species.
That's because we are, keep the facade alive!

OP: I'm Irish, we are a magical species.
 

Colour Scientist

Troll the Respawn, Jeremy!
Jul 15, 2009
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chiefohara said:
100% irish

To the rest of ireland im a corkman (our version of texas)
To dubliners im a culchie (our version of the word redneck)
Ah, it's not THAT bad, in fairness!