Irish: are any of you it?

Hagi

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Apr 10, 2011
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Heh, interesting how many people consider themselves being Irish (or I guess any other nationality) based purely on grandparents or even further up the family tree.

Personally I'd only consider myself of a nationality if I at least possessed that passport, and even then I'd be hesitant until I knew I'd picked up at least some of the culture in that country.

Not Irish myself in any way or form btw :p
 

TehGingaNinja

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Aug 13, 2011
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Yep, born and bred in Cork. Doesn't mean I can speak Irish very well though. Also, as you can see by my name, I'm Ginger. Stereotypical enough for you?
 

DaWaffledude

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Apr 23, 2011
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Born and raised in Dublin, Ireland.

Boba Frag said:
maninahat said:
The quickest way to get on my nerves is to start talking about geneology, especially if you're an American. I don't know why, but they seem obsessed with the subject, and will often bring it up early in conversation without any prompting whatsoever. The best way to get on the nerves of an Irishman is for an American to refer to themself as "Irish". As far as I'm concerned, if you have absolutely nothing to do with a foreign culture, other than a distant relative who might have been from there, then you shouldn't be giving a shit about heritage. "Acting" Irish comes across as cultural appropriation. An affectation, and nothing more.
Thanks for putting that up before I freaked out that the OP.
It actually deeply offends me when all some people, in fairness, mostly Americans, zero in on is the godamn stereotypes and the godawful and embarrassing leprechaun crap.

Again, most Americans view things like 'Irish' or 'Italian' to be exclusively ethnic descriptions, and that's fair enough, considering America's cultural melting pot. More power to them.

I don't know if it's genetic, but nothing boils my blood more than people assuming they're actually as Irish as someone born and reared on the island of Ireland. They don't mean it, but god almighty, they're Americans with Irish ancestry. There's a HUGE difference.
I couldn't have put it better myself.
 

Ando85

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Apr 27, 2011
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I'm at least 1/4 Irish maybe 1/2. My complexion is very Irish. I have a portion of native american blood yet I'm pale as a ghost.
 

Redratson

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Majority of me is with the other being Polish and english. I believe my descendents came from Co.Donegal
 

Blow_Pop

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Jan 21, 2009
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I would love to say I am directly Irish descended but I know I have some family from Ireland. Don't know how far back but slight Irish. However I more identify myself as a Euro-mutt since I have descendants from all over Europe. Though more directly as in my grandfather on my da's side I am German/French. However I'm told I burn like an Irish person. My whole family tans I step outside and turn bright red. And I have enough friends in Ireland(South) that I know better than to stereotype.
 

Verlander

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Apr 22, 2010
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MetalDooley said:
Verlander said:
Wow, I still can't get my head around how that question was put.

OT: No, and nor are most people who claim to be. Unless you, or your parent was BORN in Ireland, AND grew up there, then you are not Irish, regardless of whom you ancestor may have been.
I don't know about that to be honest.A friend of mine was born and raised in France and to the best of my knowledge he doesn't have a drop of Irish blood in him.He's been living here for years though and now holds Irish citizenship.He considers himself to be Irish now not French.Does the fact that he wasn't born here make him not Irish?

OT: 100% Irish myself.Born and raised in Cork
More to do with the "raised" thing. He may relate to being Irish, but I can't understand how he feels Irish. If you spent a load of time in England, would you consider yourself English?
 

Rylingo

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Aug 13, 2008
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Irish family. Brought up in Ireland. Currently living in Belfast. Typing this message from my parents home in derry.

So yes.
 

MetalDooley

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Verlander said:
MetalDooley said:
Verlander said:
Wow, I still can't get my head around how that question was put.

OT: No, and nor are most people who claim to be. Unless you, or your parent was BORN in Ireland, AND grew up there, then you are not Irish, regardless of whom you ancestor may have been.
I don't know about that to be honest.A friend of mine was born and raised in France and to the best of my knowledge he doesn't have a drop of Irish blood in him.He's been living here for years though and now holds Irish citizenship.He considers himself to be Irish now not French.Does the fact that he wasn't born here make him not Irish?

OT: 100% Irish myself.Born and raised in Cork
More to do with the "raised" thing. He may relate to being Irish, but I can't understand how he feels Irish. If you spent a load of time in England, would you consider yourself English?
No I would always consider myself to be the nationality of the country I was born and grew up in but that's just me.As for my friend well I guess it's down to the fact that he's lived here so long.If he classes himself as Irish now who are we to say he's not?
 

nekoali

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Aug 25, 2009
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Somewhat, I guess. I mean I'm half Irish (mother's side) and half German (father's side). But seeing as how both families emigrated to the country before the turn of the 20th century it doesn't really count that much.. The families had been from the USA for some time.

So I guess I'm half Irish in ancestry and ethnicity, but I've never even been there. Though I do want to go someday.
 

Firewind_77

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Jun 28, 2011
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Yep, Born in Cork, raised in Cork, studying in Cork.

Just a note here for anyone claiming our ancestry; You're foreign. Unless that is, you become successful! In which case the Irish media will take a sudden interest and ask about your grandmother from a small farm in Connemara during an interview about whatever it is people know your name for. They do that. It's very annoying.
 
Dec 27, 2010
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Firewind_77 said:
Just a note here for anyone claiming our ancestry; You're foreign. Unless that is, you become successful! In which case the Irish media will take a sudden interest and ask about your grandmother from a small farm in Connemara during an interview about whatever it is people know your name for. They do that. It's very annoying.
This made my day.
 

Verlander

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Apr 22, 2010
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MetalDooley said:
Verlander said:
MetalDooley said:
Verlander said:
Wow, I still can't get my head around how that question was put.

OT: No, and nor are most people who claim to be. Unless you, or your parent was BORN in Ireland, AND grew up there, then you are not Irish, regardless of whom you ancestor may have been.
I don't know about that to be honest.A friend of mine was born and raised in France and to the best of my knowledge he doesn't have a drop of Irish blood in him.He's been living here for years though and now holds Irish citizenship.He considers himself to be Irish now not French.Does the fact that he wasn't born here make him not Irish?

OT: 100% Irish myself.Born and raised in Cork
More to do with the "raised" thing. He may relate to being Irish, but I can't understand how he feels Irish. If you spent a load of time in England, would you consider yourself English?
No I would always consider myself to be the nationality of the country I was born and grew up in but that's just me.As for my friend well I guess it's down to the fact that he's lived here so long.If he classes himself as Irish now who are we to say he's not?
Well technically governments don't. They'd class him as French with Irish citizenship, which is why when you complete advanced or official documents, they enquire into your past rather than just your current status. Although I see your point.