Irish: are any of you it?

FalloutJack

Bah weep grah nah neep ninny bom
Nov 20, 2008
15,489
0
0
*Puts on a green hat*

Aye. But I warn ya. The other hand be shaking with Italians.
 

iDoom46

New member
Dec 31, 2010
268
0
0
I'm American, but my ancestry is -mostly- Irish.
My mom's parents were the first American-born children of Irish immigrants, who try their best to keep the Irish traditions in the family.
My dad is only half Irish (mother was Irish, father was Finnish/German), and somehow that makes it OK for him to make fun of the rest of us for being "so Irish".

So potatoes are delicious and drinking socially with family is something we like to do. Fine, but I also love Italian food and my mom has a slight Brooklyn accent, that doesn't make us "so Italian"!

Well, whatever. I'm American, but my dad and my friends will still keep jokingly throwing Irish insults at me for as long as I'm still here, so I might as well get used to it...
 

Colour Scientist

Troll the Respawn, Jeremy!
Jul 15, 2009
4,722
0
0
No_Remainders said:
Colour-Scientist said:
I am. Born and bred. I've even been know to say "Era" on a number of occasions.
Era?
Please, if you're going to start trying to say "Éire", at least learn to spell it properly.
Sorry, what? I meant the colloquialism.
 

No_Remainders

New member
Sep 11, 2009
1,872
0
0
Colour-Scientist said:
No_Remainders said:
Colour-Scientist said:
I am. Born and bred. I've even been know to say "Era" on a number of occasions.
Era?
Please, if you're going to start trying to say "Éire", at least learn to spell it properly.
Sorry, what? I meant the colloquialism.
What colloquialism is this?

Unless it's some absurd one from down the country I call shenanigans!
 

Colour Scientist

Troll the Respawn, Jeremy!
Jul 15, 2009
4,722
0
0
No_Remainders said:
What colloquialism is this?

Unless it's some absurd one from down the country I call shenanigans!
"Era" is used before sentences by a lot of culchie old people. It doesn't actually mean anything it's just said, like, "Era, the cows are shite".
 

No_Remainders

New member
Sep 11, 2009
1,872
0
0
Colour-Scientist said:
No_Remainders said:
What colloquialism is this?

Unless it's some absurd one from down the country I call shenanigans!
"Era" is used before sentences by a lot of culchie old people. It doesn't actually mean anything it's just said, like, "Era, the cows are shite".
That explains it, as I rarely leave the big schmoke for more than two or three days at a time.


I like it here.

In any case. Carry on.
 

DPeteD

New member
May 29, 2011
107
0
0
yep irish here! born and raised. well northern irish anyway. yes ireland is two countries.
 

inFAMOUSCowZ

New member
Jul 12, 2010
1,586
0
0
I have some Irish in me, but I'm American, so that means I got about 10 other ethnic groups thrown in there too.
 
Dec 27, 2010
814
0
0
Kaiser Jon said:
I'd say 60%+ of all Americans are mostly Irish.
Actually I believe the statistics are; 80% have an Irish ancestor and think they're Irish, the other 20% don't have any Irish relations and still think they're Irish.
 

Thespian

New member
Sep 11, 2010
1,407
0
0
Yep, I'm Irish. Born in Dublin but I suppose I qualify as a Meath man, since I lived there all my life. I don't have the accent to match, though. Also, I seem to have noticed a whole bunch of Irish Escapists.

Boba Frag said:
I don't know if it's genetic, but nothing boils my blood more than people assuming they're actually as Irish as someone born and reared on the island of Ireland. They don't mean it, but god almighty, they're Americans with Irish ancestry. There's a HUGE difference.

For the record, I'm a citizen of the Republic of Ireland and I'm from Cork. I'm perhaps too proud of my cultural identity.
I totally agree here. I'm not exactly annoyed by it, but I don't understand how so many people are completely convinced that they are 100% Irish, and I'm a tad befuddled as to why they want to be so badly. Not that being Irish is bad, of course, but I for one love Scandinavian mythology and whatnot and it's likely that I'm descended from vikings, but that doesn't mean I go around wearing a spiky helmet and claiming that I've got roots there.
I guess it's flattering. Doesn't bother me, but it does confuse me a little.

No_Remainders said:
Colour-Scientist said:
"Era" is used before sentences by a lot of culchie old people. It doesn't actually mean anything it's just said, like, "Era, the cows are shite".
That explains it, as I rarely leave the big schmoke for more than two or three days at a time.


I like it here.

In any case. Carry on.
Never thought I'd see the words "Big Schmoke" on the Escapist. Also, if it helps, I've only ever known it as "Ara"
 

KoalaKid

New member
Apr 15, 2011
214
0
0
Verlander said:
Ninjamedic said:
Verlander said:
If it makes you happy, yes
Actually most of the people here meet your "requirements".
Yes, all of the "I'm a third" or "My grandfather was 100%" makes them all Irish.

Most of the people here aren't, and the folk from new world countries seem to have some sort of inherited patriotism for a place they have never been to. I laid out fair criteria, it could be said that you're only Irish if you're born and raised there. People need to be satisfied with who they are, and if we're lucky, ignore this ridiculous "pride" in a political measurement.
I'm pretty sure these people are claiming ethnicity by being of Irish decent. Their not claiming nationality and if they have an interest in the culture of their ancestors whats the problem with that? Also, If your saying that Irish Americans have lost rights to Irish culture because of their ancestors acclamation to another dominate culture you might want to ask yourself why out of the native Irish only something like 15% of them speak their own language.
 

Arashi500

New member
Sep 19, 2009
40
0
0
This all depends on what you mean by Irish. Irish citizen, Irish blood, what have you. I DO know however that many Americans of Irish descent are proud of it and even if they've never been to the isle, would fight you if you proclaimed that made them not Irish, and vise versa. Fact: There are more people of heavy Irish descent in America then there are Irish citizens. Interesting tibbit.


I don't have an Irish citizenship, and I was born in the USA, but I'm of heavy Irish descent (1/2 or 3/4), and was concieved in Ireland. I'd say that makes me Irish, to an extent.
 

SckizoBoy

Ineptly Chaotic
Legacy
Apr 5, 2020
8,607
148
68
A Hermit's Cave
AntonicKnight said:
I can do an Irish accent, is that good enough?
Likewise...

Seriously, though not Irish... not in the slightest...

Funny story though, single most hilarious thing that's ever been said to me when I'm stumbling into a seminar somewhere in Waterford, feeling completely shit-faced: 'You're remarkably sober for someone who's been to an Irish wedding!'
 

neonsword13-ops

~ Struck by a Smooth Criminal ~
Mar 28, 2011
2,771
0
0
On my mother's side.

Great Grand-Father was an Irishman and Great Grand-Mother was a German.

No idea how they got to America though. Strange.
 

General BrEeZy

New member
Jul 26, 2009
962
0
0
im American to the bone, but i do have Irish blood, and i really wanna visit Ireland someday! along with my other primary heritages; namely Scotland, Denmark and England.