Poll: Do you prefer American English spelling or British English spelling?

Northpaw

New member
Mar 31, 2009
18
0
0
Growing up in the United States, I naturally use American English. It's not so much a matter of preference as it is using what I learned and being fine with it. It's not as if an extra vowel here and there, among other spelling differences, makes anything better or worse.
 

Crowghast

New member
Aug 29, 2008
863
0
0
NeutralDrow said:
Crowghast said:
UpSkirtDistress said:
Hmm Do I prefer American English or English English let me think grrrr
the clue is in the name fair enough a language has to evole but Americans just Change spellings to make words easier thats not evolvolution its lazy.
It is not "enclosed", it is "Encloased". Middle English spelling was perfectly fine, I don't know why the English changed it.
Ic ungemódness mid þú...
That there is even older, and [i\]much[/i] better. Damn you Englishmen for constantly altering the language.

And then giving it to the Americans.
 

IamQ

New member
Mar 29, 2009
5,226
0
0
I like both, but I have to say the British swearwords are so much better, mainly because the U.S doesn't have any swear words the british don't.

Bollocks!
 

Snugglebunny

New member
Mar 25, 2009
283
0
0
This whole english/british thing gives me a brain hemmorage >< I was raised in Australia and although I've lived in the US for most of my life I still have no freaking idea how to spell "gra/ey" is it GRAY or is it GREY!?! IT SOUNDS THE SAME!! ARE YOU HAPPY MISS HEMSLEY!?!
 

MagicShroom

New member
Mar 29, 2009
237
0
0
I perfered bastardized english and 1337

k4w5 i7z t3h gr87357 3v4rr!!!111!!!!

edit: British English just sounds better but why input unnecessary letters in words that don't need them?
 

NeutralDrow

New member
Mar 23, 2009
9,097
0
0
Snugglebunny said:
This whole english/british thing gives me a brain hemmorage >< I was raised in Australia and although I've lived in the US for most of my life I still have no freaking idea how to spell "gra/ey" is it GRAY or is it GREY!?! IT SOUNDS THE SAME!! ARE YOU HAPPY MISS HEMSLEY!?!
It's spelled either way.
 

Alizarin

New member
Apr 4, 2009
1
0
0
Ok, just for the record, the people from England did not make English. They made what is now called Old English. After so many years of bastardizing it, it turned into Middle English, and from there to Modern English. They already bastardized it, so we can bastardize it as much as we want.

So please, go cry about it some more. I really hate when people cry because the dropping of a 'u'. I personally prefer the British version of the spelling because everything just looks right to me, even though I am an American.

Except for 'Boot' instead of 'Trunk'
The whole Trunk is on an elephant is a legitimate argument, but the sentence 'Take the boot(footwear) out of the boot(trunk)' doesn't seem right to me. But that's probably just because I grew up in America.
 

The Young One

New member
Mar 26, 2009
268
0
0
I know that the English Language was formed largely as a result of 'lone words', most of which being Latin, Celtic, French and so on. To me, Middle English is fairly easy to understand, on the whole but I prefer Modern English over it.
I never say 'trunk' unless referring to an elephant.
It's always a car boot.
 

new_age_reject

Lives in dactylic hexameter.
Dec 28, 2008
1,160
0
0
British English as that is where the language was made.
But this topic will probably create a flame war and be locked ^_^
 

Spirultima

New member
Jul 25, 2008
1,466
0
0
iamnotincompliance said:
Spirultima said:
Hehe, i'm not so easily beat.

No your right there was no regulating body, BUT the language was counted as part of the Empire and so therefore had to be consulted, the leader of the British Empire, i.e. the king/the queen, which paperwork, or even verbal contract, which was NOT filed and therefore still "American" English stays a unofficial splinter language.

Boom, headshot.
Oookay... assuming, for a second, I believe that the language is somehow controlled by the Empire when the consensus is no body controls it at all, there's still that little matter of we haven't listened to the Empire in over two centuries. Even if the king or queen did exert power over our mutual language (which they don't), America wouldn't care. As such, even if said regulatory body did exist, us not caring, English would continue to evolve on both sides of the Atlantic until we can't understand each other at all, in much the same way English evolved from German. Oh yes, if you had clicked my link (which I doubt), you would have noticed that. You say American English is an unofficial splinter language from the proper British (in spite of the point I have already made several times). Fine. I contend English as a whole is an unofficial splinter of German, and I highly doubt either one of us filed the correct paperwork to change German into the bastardized mess English is today. First one to fill out the forms with Chancellor Merkel gets control of the language in perpetuity.

Ready?
At this point in time, you have diverted the argument elsewhere from the point of question, did this thread, or did it not say "American English or British English"? if so, where does German come into this? The question is not if British English is a unoffical decendant from Germany, but is American English a unoffical splinter language from British English, so answer the question and stop acting like a politian, Then i will answer yours.

As some idiots say
"Stick that in your pipe and smoke it"
 

BlackKraken

New member
Apr 4, 2009
196
0
0
Language changes all the time, unnecessary silent letters are just throwbacks from when they were different words or bastardized from other languages.
Aluminum does make me laugh though, probably because it fits too much in the "phenomenon" song. I always imagine the muppets singing it when i hear it.
 

NeutralDrow

New member
Mar 23, 2009
9,097
0
0
Spirultima said:
iamnotincompliance said:
Spirultima said:
Hehe, i'm not so easily beat.

No your right there was no regulating body, BUT the language was counted as part of the Empire and so therefore had to be consulted, the leader of the British Empire, i.e. the king/the queen, which paperwork, or even verbal contract, which was NOT filed and therefore still "American" English stays a unofficial splinter language.

Boom, headshot.
Oookay... assuming, for a second, I believe that the language is somehow controlled by the Empire when the consensus is no body controls it at all, there's still that little matter of we haven't listened to the Empire in over two centuries. Even if the king or queen did exert power over our mutual language (which they don't), America wouldn't care. As such, even if said regulatory body did exist, us not caring, English would continue to evolve on both sides of the Atlantic until we can't understand each other at all, in much the same way English evolved from German. Oh yes, if you had clicked my link (which I doubt), you would have noticed that. You say American English is an unofficial splinter language from the proper British (in spite of the point I have already made several times). Fine. I contend English as a whole is an unofficial splinter of German, and I highly doubt either one of us filed the correct paperwork to change German into the bastardized mess English is today. First one to fill out the forms with Chancellor Merkel gets control of the language in perpetuity.

Ready?
At this point in time, you have diverted the argument elsewhere from the point of question, did this thread, or did it not say "American English or British English"? if so, where does German come into this? The question is not if British English is a unoffical decendant from Germany, but is American English a unoffical splinter language from British English, so answer the question and stop acting like a politian, Then i will answer yours.

As some idiots say
"Stick that in your pipe and smoke it"
German comes into play because it's involved in a similar situation. Just as Americans didn't require approval for their language that evolved out of British English, Brits didn't require approval from Germany when English evolved out of German. It's not a perfect parallel, since one is a language change and the other is a dialect change, but it still fits.

And you don't have to respond to the question, since you have no leg to stand on. Without an official regulating body ala the French Academy, the idea of an "unofficial splinter language" is absurd.

Not to mention the idea that you consider American English and British English to be two separate languages is laughable.
 

NeutralDrow

New member
Mar 23, 2009
9,097
0
0
new_age_reject said:
British English as that is where the language was made.
But this topic will probably create a flame war and be locked ^_^
If they haven't locked it by now, they won't until we start cursing each other out.
 

pantsoffdanceoff

New member
Jun 14, 2008
2,751
0
0
Matronadena said:
I've never been able to completely shake the proper Cambridge spelling. Drives me nuts that words like Colour, honour, sabre , etc get flagged as incorrect >.<
Yeah I get marked off on essays for it, but I just can't stop.
 

Agent Larkin

New member
Apr 6, 2009
2,795
0
0
British English all the way but then again im irish and can't stand seeing colour spelt without a u.
 

Jobz

New member
May 5, 2008
1,091
0
0
I was taught the British system, so that's what I'm more used to, but I really don't care all that much to be honest with you.
 

Azeban

New member
Sep 27, 2008
229
0
0
American spelling, for the most part.

Although, I can't understand for the life of me why doughnut was shortened to donut.