Step Away From The Controller

Suikun

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Mar 25, 2009
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I don't really agree with this article... I mean, yes, obesity and poor health choices, along with kids spending hours of time devoted to a videogame character probably isn't the most wonderful thing of all, but it's certainly not the worst.

I agree that to some extent; kids should be active and have normal social lives. However, it's not easy by any means for kids to meet someone who has similar interests and the like if it doesn't involve some sort of video game. The term "gamer" has broadened and even become an umbrella for new sub-cliques like casual and hardcore gamers. Heck, even MMO fans of a feather stick together, and the FPS crowd will always be chatting it up about that amazing frag they got last night.

I speak as a person whom Obama is trying to jettison into the real world with only a handful of D&D manuals and a few dice as protection from the hordes of humanity. Am I particularly healthy? Actually, yes. Aside from procrastination, I've been able to easily breeze through high school, oftentimes calling on knowledge I learned from the very games that nurtured me through my youth when I was the kid everybody picked on and hated "just because".

My real-life buddies are very much alike, and it's not really our fault. We do try and get out to experience the world, but every attempt we make at getting into a party scene, or going outside to play sports, it crumbles into the same old prejudice of the First-Grade playground. We're outcasts, so we turn to one another. Because we aren't common, we connect with people online because they share the same stories as we do, and it's nice to know that you're not the only person who happens to be on this miserable little world who had their school bully beat the snot out of them just for existing.

Sure, you can send kids out to go play and the like, but chances are if they've already gotten into gaming, they're more likely to sit on the sidelines and end up chatting about their favorite titles and epic stories of pwn than to be called into the game without a roll of the eyes or an exasperated sigh that "that kid" has to be on their team.

I guarantee you that anybody who's been through what I've described probably feels the same way I do: an underlying hatred for humanity because you've become the outcast for no other reason for existing, and that videogames are a place for them to escape and live out their fantasies because the harsh reality of the world... well, sucks!

I agree that kids need to do their work and that they should at least try to keep themselves healthy enough that they don't risk having a heart attack at age 30, or a waistline of triple digits. I agree that having a close social network of friends is a wonderful thing. However, there's no say that you can't do these things alongside, or even through videogames. Brain Age, Wii Fit, My [insert subject here] Coach, and even to a lesser extent, Guitar Hero and Rock Band all have at least tried to get gamers out of their reclusive shells and into being more healthy and not speaking 1337 to the manager of the job you're applying for. They didn't exactly fail, either. It also opened a window for the old bullies and bigots that shoved us around to see what gaming really was; something beautiful and artistic, a free expression of oneself through a virtual medium. Well, in some games at least... you know what I mean.

My point is: we shouldn't force kids out into the world expecting they'll pick up a football and become the next John Elway. It's simply not going to happen. Supporting a healthy lifestyle is great and all, but name one insecure, overweight teenager who will WILLINGLY walk into a gym and struggle with a fourth of his weight on the bench press.

Sorry if I sound like I'm ranting here, but this is why the fat, nerdy gamer image was made. It's hard to let go of something where you feel you belong.
 

CrafterMan

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Aug 3, 2008
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I agree with this article. I'm a gamer, and I work in retail. (So therefore I should be unhealthy) xD

I smoke and drink! But I play tennis, box, and have a weight set in my room. Little enjoyments in between the bad stuff!

-Joe
 

hansari

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Malygris said:
Step Away From The Controller

Is Obama on an anti-gaming crusade?

Read Full Article
xmetatr0nx said:
Well the issue is much more broad than just gamers. There is a health problem of obesity in this country. ....
Man... has there been a study done on this yet? I mean there has got to be somebody at a University interested in studying "the correlation between time spent playing video games and obesity."

To me this is all laughable stereotypes that show Obamas age. The day when a "gamer" could be cast as some sort of anti-social, shower-skipping, fatty is over.

I mean hell...at my University we actually have a gaming club for students to participate in. Of the 20 some "regulars" that stop by, only two could be classified as overweight.

Seriously, someone put a study together. Cause from what I can tell, there is something else that contributes to obesity in a much greater way; Eating way TOO MUCH.
 

Shadowtalon

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Apr 14, 2009
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Therumancer said:
As far as the rest goes, the problem with things like gangs is that community action is NOT going to get rid of them. It's been tried. The whole point of gangs is that they can overpower the community (duh) they never would have gotten to the point of a problem if people could just decide to get rid of them.
But the thing is, everything gangs get, they get from their community. Without a community, there would be no buyers for drugs, no gas stations to knock over, and no misguided youth to recruit. The community has power over them in that they hold the resources that the gang needs to remain running. Also a lot of gang members see themselves as defending their community from other gangs, so a strong amount of disapproval could cause members to become disillusioned. The parasite cannot exist without the host.
 

the1ultimate

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Apr 7, 2009
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Well as a grown-up gamer child myself, I think Obama is actually trying to associate gaming with lack of exercise and under-achievement. It's a similar stance to the one my Mum took because she would constantly say that I was wasting my time, while she was sitting down with her trashy magazines drinking tea.

So, I've grown up a bit now and I'm fit; clever; and I have a bit of a tan. Does that make me a non-gamer?
I agree with the fundamental principle, but don't think see that his message will see any significant rise in the amount of people looking after themselves. Unless he starts legislating...
 

Therumancer

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Nov 28, 2007
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Shadowtalon said:
Therumancer said:
As far as the rest goes, the problem with things like gangs is that community action is NOT going to get rid of them. It's been tried. The whole point of gangs is that they can overpower the community (duh) they never would have gotten to the point of a problem if people could just decide to get rid of them.
But the thing is, everything gangs get, they get from their community. Without a community, there would be no buyers for drugs, no gas stations to knock over, and no misguided youth to recruit. The community has power over them in that they hold the resources that the gang needs to remain running. Also a lot of gang members see themselves as defending their community from other gangs, so a strong amount of disapproval could cause members to become disillusioned. The parasite cannot exist without the host.
However a parasite can kill the host as it goes down.

The trick here is to kill the parasite so the host can recover.

Like most discussions on the internet we're going to have to agree to disagree, and we are getting ridiculously far afield of the original subject, and even questions about what Obama can do.

Simply put I think he's blaming video games for problems they have nothing to do with, and using them as a scapegoat has more than one angle to it. Either way I dislike this being done as a gamer.

When it comes to crime, I'm of the opinion that the best way to deal with it involves strong police action, lots of jail space, and no hestitation to replace that jail space with graveyard plots when and where nessicary (great latitude in the use of force was one of the defining characteristics of both CRASH and the more infamous NYC Street Crimes unit). All joking aside I think there is definatly a place between the law enforcement we have now and ultra fascist "Judge Dredd" like Law Enforcement.
 

Guitar Gamer

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Apr 12, 2009
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sun? hmmmm I might have to look that up,

but really though there's no argument here, hell I've hardly gamed in a week (mostly swimming in the heat wave) but I agree completly, but we mustn't forget that videogames are not the problem, it's the people who are supplying them, if parents are mad that their kids are becoming they should plug the machien while the kids are on their piss break and shove them outside, really gaming wasn't on the top of my fun things list as a little kid but ,aybe that was because we were a little poor anyways back on topic there's nothing wrong with going to this fabled outside as long as it's not taking a weird turn into a crusade against video stimulation
Suikun said:
big dam snip
nah no argument here, though you must admit that there's a physical activity for next to everyone, I'm no athlete and I'm not what you would say is in "good shape" but I grab a towel and start swimming the moment someone brings up the subject
 

Robert632

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May 11, 2009
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no he is just smart.a lot of gamers are below voting age, and a lot of parents are concerned that children are becoming lazy from them, so there's a chance he will get there votes.
 

capnjack

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Jan 6, 2009
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Malygris said:
Step Away From The Controller

Is Obama on an anti-gaming crusade?

Read Full Article
Great article. For a second I thought you were going to go the wrong direction and be annoyed by Obama's comment, but it's good to see someone accepting the reality that gaming is a massive time waster and it wouldn't hurt to have other hobbies.

As someone who loves games, I know I can spend half a day playing them if I were given the chance. And you're right, it's not any worse than web-surfing or even watching television. All these things can have value, but it's the excess that is a problem.

Suikun said:
I agree that to some extent; kids should be active and have normal social lives. However, it's not easy by any means for kids to meet someone who has similar interests and the like if it doesn't involve some sort of video game.
The article isn't saying you shouldn't play video games. But taking heed of Obama's remarks and finding other hobbies as well can only hurt you.

My point is: we shouldn't force kids out into the world expecting they'll pick up a football and become the next John Elway. It's simply not going to happen. Supporting a healthy lifestyle is great and all, but name one insecure, overweight teenager who will WILLINGLY walk into a gym and struggle with a fourth of his weight on the bench press.
Again, you're missing the point. This isn't about obesity or playing sports. It's about excellence. It's about achieving as much as you can, and not using gaming as an escape from reality. I may very well be a hypocrite here, because I'm the key example of an escapist and I understand your dissatisfaction with reality quite well, but I also realize the harm that such lifestyles can have.

I don't know about you, or your life, and I won't pretend like I do, but anyone I know who plays games too much does so because they're dissatisfied with their own lives, and they can change that. Personally, if I waste too much time, I begin to feel lethargic. It's what escapism does, and it can happen with any medium.

I don't think Chalk or Obama are discouraging gaming in any way - they're discouraging excess. Put down the controller and take a walk, read a book, learn to play a guitar or xylophone or a damn recorder if you like it, but do other things you enjoy.
 

Redingold

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Mar 28, 2009
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GAH! While I understand what he's saying, he's foolish to pick on gaming. The same could be said for watching TV, or reading a book. He should have simply said that people need to get off their fat asses (not in those words, of course).
 

Stryc9

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Nov 12, 2008
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I don't agree with 90% of the stuff that comes out of Obama's mouth but I do agree with what he's saying here. He's not saying don't let your kids play video games at all, he's saying limit the amount of time they do get to spend playing games. He's also saying limit the amount of time your kids spend watching TV. He's not trying to pass laws that would make limits he's just trying to get parents to do their damn jobs and raise their kids instead of relying on the schools and the TV and video games to do it.

I mean seriously I've seen parents just turn on the TV, sit their kids in front of it and walk off. When you ask them if they think that's good for their kids they say, "It keeps them quiet and that's all that matters to me." That's not good parenting and these people wonder why later in life their kids are so damn stupid it's not funny. Seriously most of the people I went to school with couldn't grasp simple concepts or even make simple decisions on their own, but they could sure tell you what happened on every episode of their favorite show on TV, (video games weren't exactly popular in the hillbilly school I went to)

I've seen parent's bribe their kids with video games to do simple chores the kids should be doing anyway too. Once I was in a GameStop just browsing when this lady and her husband and one of their kids walked in, she was on her cell phone with another of her kids saying she would buy the kid the games he asked for, then buy him three more if he would clean his room, and asked him for the titles. I would be willing to bet that by the time they got home that kid hadn't done a damn thing and he still got all his games without having to lift a finger.

Obama isn't on an anti-game crusade, he's on an anti-bad-parenting crusade.
 

Jiki

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Jan 21, 2008
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I find it funny how Obama and deception are mentioned in the same article. Deception's used rather poorly though since the context doesn't indicate deception, but more like stupidity and blind fanboyism, hence the inability to see ones' dearests' less positive traits.
 

Giraffle

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Jul 26, 2009
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I agree with this completely, yes, kids should be out doing productive things, and playing outside, its genuine fun. But if a kid wants to play video games, why not let him? Things are okay as long as they stay in certain degrees, for instance: if a kid like videogames, and plays them quite a bit, then sure its okay. Now if a kid plays video games pretty much all the time, and refuses to do anything else, then it starts being a problem.

I will admit, ive basically been a gamer all my life, ive never been too much of a hardcore gamer though, but when I was a kid, I used to complain and whine when I wasnt near my video games, but now im different, i'll put down my game and go and do anything else. I play a lot of video games, and sit around the computer all day, but if my family or friends want to go out and do something, I wont hesitate to go.

Basically my point is that games arent bad as far as anti-socialization. Its just how much of their life gamers devote video games to. Its un-healthy for someone to neglect everyday activities and play video games all day, but its not un-healthy to play video games.
 

tex2790

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Jun 28, 2009
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Honestly, just about everyone in my age group, teenagers, play games all day everyday. Even if I wanted to go outside like you did when you were kids, I couldn't go out unless I felt like being alone. So the few kids now a days who still go outside and play are just a small handful of our nation's kids. We are growing up with these games and technology, I,being one of those "fat,lazy,kids", know, that its a new age and you need to get over it. Every single one of my friends play games all day everyday, but it doesnt mean we are fat or lazy. It is just what we do for fun, and there is nothing wrong with it.
 

shaderkul

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Apr 19, 2009
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Suikun said:
I don't really agree with this article... I mean, yes, obesity and poor health choices, along with kids spending hours of time devoted to a videogame character probably isn't the most wonderful thing of all, but it's certainly not the worst.

I agree that to some extent; kids should be active and have normal social lives. However, it's not easy by any means for kids to meet someone who has similar interests and the like if it doesn't involve some sort of video game. The term "gamer" has broadened and even become an umbrella for new sub-cliques like casual and hardcore gamers. Heck, even MMO fans of a feather stick together, and the FPS crowd will always be chatting it up about that amazing frag they got last night.

I speak as a person whom Obama is trying to jettison into the real world with only a handful of D&D manuals and a few dice as protection from the hordes of humanity. Am I particularly healthy? Actually, yes. Aside from procrastination, I've been able to easily breeze through high school, oftentimes calling on knowledge I learned from the very games that nurtured me through my youth when I was the kid everybody picked on and hated "just because".

My real-life buddies are very much alike, and it's not really our fault. We do try and get out to experience the world, but every attempt we make at getting into a party scene, or going outside to play sports, it crumbles into the same old prejudice of the First-Grade playground. We're outcasts, so we turn to one another. Because we aren't common, we connect with people online because they share the same stories as we do, and it's nice to know that you're not the only person who happens to be on this miserable little world who had their school bully beat the snot out of them just for existing.

Sure, you can send kids out to go play and the like, but chances are if they've already gotten into gaming, they're more likely to sit on the sidelines and end up chatting about their favorite titles and epic stories of pwn than to be called into the game without a roll of the eyes or an exasperated sigh that "that kid" has to be on their team.

I guarantee you that anybody who's been through what I've described probably feels the same way I do: an underlying hatred for humanity because you've become the outcast for no other reason for existing, and that videogames are a place for them to escape and live out their fantasies because the harsh reality of the world... well, sucks!

I agree that kids need to do their work and that they should at least try to keep themselves healthy enough that they don't risk having a heart attack at age 30, or a waistline of triple digits. I agree that having a close social network of friends is a wonderful thing. However, there's no say that you can't do these things alongside, or even through videogames. Brain Age, Wii Fit, My [insert subject here] Coach, and even to a lesser extent, Guitar Hero and Rock Band all have at least tried to get gamers out of their reclusive shells and into being more healthy and not speaking 1337 to the manager of the job you're applying for. They didn't exactly fail, either. It also opened a window for the old bullies and bigots that shoved us around to see what gaming really was; something beautiful and artistic, a free expression of oneself through a virtual medium. Well, in some games at least... you know what I mean.

My point is: we shouldn't force kids out into the world expecting they'll pick up a football and become the next John Elway. It's simply not going to happen. Supporting a healthy lifestyle is great and all, but name one insecure, overweight teenager who will WILLINGLY walk into a gym and struggle with a fourth of his weight on the bench press.

Sorry if I sound like I'm ranting here, but this is why the fat, nerdy gamer image was made. It's hard to let go of something where you feel you belong.

I'm sorry if I sound harsh here, but don't u think you are blaming everyone else for your problems?

"I guarantee you that anybody who's been through what I've described probably feels the same way I do: an underlying hatred for humanity because you've become the outcast for no other reason for existing, and that videogames are a place for them to escape and live out their fantasies because the harsh reality of the world... well, sucks!"

Wow,I think we should all get a grip and face challenges of life like any other human being. My point is, whether you are a nerd or not,a school kid or a full grown man working in a company, a pauper in the slums or a heiress with a silver spoon in your mouth, there will always be bullies and bigots and jackasses who will want to make your life miserable because they can. Its up to you to decide whether you allow them or not, and not use gaming as a cry teddy, period.

All the more reason why kids should get of their pale bums and go out. Like many have said here: Moderation is key.
 

zilek

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Jul 22, 2009
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I generally disagree with him in so many games. I feel this focus of video games in general is wrong because it is all entertaintment... not video games specifically. It is also the environment and person who is playing and taking part/being entertained which is apart of any such problem.

I personally use the computer a lot, but the amount of time I spend playing computer games and such is often less, but usually the same amount of time that people use to watch TV every evening. Many people get home from work, school or such and watch TV for a few hours or more, but some of us happen to go play a few video games. Essentially both are the same, entertainment, but to me video games are more interactive and I have learn a lot from playing them.

Yes encourage people to become more healthy or vary what they are doing, but dont focus the blame on video games. And if you cant manage that, then people obviously need to be given entertaining ways to do these other activities.