The Closure of HMV

agent_orange420

New member
Sep 30, 2011
75
0
0
lost interest when HMV stopped selling records. there collection was always a bit on the naff side, but the decks were always heavily queued up. and that was around 2005 they stopped selling defunct tech.

Their games display has been a puzzler of recent. Their second hand for one. MOH warfight was more expensive second hand than brand new. Didn't quite undrstand it. I would have taken a picture, might on friday.

Only bought two presents for Christmas this year from HMV. and both of those were in the sale. Blockbusters hasnt really recovered since DVD;s came out and the little video shops started selling of their videos for pennies. Then came online and hammered them even more. Now the supermarkets can afford to sell the main titles for lesswhen freshly released. Sad, butthe best Blockbusters arn't found on the high street in the UK, their are the big out of town stores. The small in town branches are rubbish.
 

Limie

New member
Feb 18, 2010
161
0
0
It is a real shame that HMV is going. I prefer buying physical copies of films and games and am willing to pay more to buy something from a shop than online. Mostly because the consumer laws concerning returning online merchandise are iffy at best in the uk.
However HMV's pricing was at times extortionate and unfortunately I could not afford it. In addition sometimes it was just plain strange. At one point I managed to find the complete boxset of all of the seasons of a television series I liked for £27, but if you looked on the shelf beside it, each individual season was priced at £30. Why would anyone buy the individual series? That and having 5 year old games sold at 1 to 2 times their release day prices, meant that I have not bought anything from there in a long while.
I it a real shame that yet more jobs are going to be lost as it is really hard to get a job at the moment and the customer service was always brilliant at my local HMV.
I am worried about waterstones now. It is the only bookshop for at least 30 miles and they have the similar pricing tactics. I feel it will be a horrible thing to have bookstores completely disappear.
 

Kinitawowi

New member
Nov 21, 2012
575
0
0
TimeLord said:
High street stores have dug their own grave by not being competitive or even attempting to keep up with the internet in terms of pricing, sales and everything else.
Newsflash: they can't.

HMV consists of the astronomical land rental on about 230 stores, 4,500 staff who all need to be paid and trained and covered for holidays, business rates and tax, and sundry overheads like lighting.

Amazon consists of a warehouse on an island somewhere.

There is literally no way for a high street store to compete with an online one except through additional customer support and services (the entire point of PC World's KnowHow concept), or through selling a product that simply doesn't work online (people still want to try on clothes before they buy them, although if 3D rendering gets viable and things get cheap enough even that might change in due course). If you don't have those, the pricing differences are literally unsurmountable; and in this day and age, those differences are more important than ever.
 

MetalDooley

Cwipes!!!
May 27, 2020
2,054
0
1
Country
Ireland
Aarowbeatsdragon said:
wait what? here in Ireland they were always 20 euro cheeper than gamestop.
OT. I'm gonna miss this store, it was one of my favorites.
I always found them to be reasonable too.I'd often stroll into my local HMV and pick up a game for half the price other stores were charging

With Game gone and HMV up shit creek we're quickly running out of choices
 

Pink Gregory

New member
Jul 30, 2008
2,296
0
0
Limie said:
I am worried about waterstones now. It is the only bookshop for at least 30 miles and they have the similar pricing tactics. I feel it will be a horrible thing to have bookstores completely disappear.
Waterstones sells books at the RRP that's on the book, presumably set by the publisher. If there are any price markups there, I'm not seeing them, and I worked there.

Would piss me off if Waterstones went, but I reckon it's a mite different kettle of fish to other entertainment.
 

TimeLord

For the Emperor!
Legacy
Apr 5, 2020
7,507
0
1
Kinitawowi said:
TimeLord said:
High street stores have dug their own grave by not being competitive or even attempting to keep up with the internet in terms of pricing, sales and everything else.
Newsflash: they can't.
It is a victim of the relentless advance of the internet. In this day and age, running a media business like HMV is like starting a race 100m behind everyone else with a bullet in both feet.

My point still stands. High street stores like HMV can't keep up with the internet and thus, are doomed.
As you said, places like PC world and clothes shops can still survive due to having facilities that you can't get on the internet (ability to try on clothes etc), but you can get everything that you can get at HMV off (for example) play.com for a lower price and free postage.
 

Kinitawowi

New member
Nov 21, 2012
575
0
0
TimeLord said:
My point still stands. High street stores like HMV can't keep up with the internet and thus, are doomed.
Oh, undoubtedly. I think it was the "not even attempting to keep up" that I was looking at, as if the reason for the high street being more expensive is just arrogance. The only things the High Street has over the Internet right now are immediacy and socialisation; and people are less and less willing to pay for those now that the price differences are big enough and they can chat to everyone on Facebook rather than arranging shopping trip meetups or such.

The high street of the future will consist of clothes shops, pound shops, restaurants and takeaways. Give it five years (maybe less) and that'll literally be all that's left.
 

J Tyran

New member
Dec 15, 2011
2,407
0
0
Kinitawowi said:
Amazon consists of a warehouse on an island somewhere.
You say this as if its a trivial nothing, if you understand the complexity and amount of effort and resources that go into a warehouse you wouldn't be so dismissive. Fun fact, it takes nearly as many staff to run a single loading dock as it would do to run a medium sized store. Depending on the level of automation of course, some could handle it with almost no staff some would need more staff.
 

Kinitawowi

New member
Nov 21, 2012
575
0
0
J Tyran said:
You say this as if its a trivial nothing, if you understand the complexity and amount of effort and resources that go into a warehouse you wouldn't be so dismissive. Fun fact, it takes nearly as many staff to run a single loading dock as it would do to run a medium sized store. Depending on the level of automation of course, some could handle it with almost no staff some would need more staff.
Relative to as sprawling a company as HMV, yes it's trivial. Obviously the logistics of warehouse management still take their toll.

A quick Wiki trip tells me that Amazon have maybe eight warehousing sites in the UK, all heavily automated and absolutely none in prime shopping centre or High Street locations. HMV have 230 stores, of which 60% are in shopping centres. The difference in overhead is colossal.
 

J Tyran

New member
Dec 15, 2011
2,407
0
0
Kinitawowi said:
J Tyran said:
You say this as if its a trivial nothing, if you understand the complexity and amount of effort and resources that go into a warehouse you wouldn't be so dismissive. Fun fact, it takes nearly as many staff to run a single loading dock as it would do to run a medium sized store. Depending on the level of automation of course, some could handle it with almost no staff some would need more staff.
Relative to as sprawling a company as HMV, yes it's trivial. Obviously the logistics of warehouse management still take their toll.

A quick Wiki trip tells me that Amazon have maybe eight warehousing sites in the UK, all heavily automated and absolutely none in prime shopping centre or High Street locations. HMV have 230 stores, of which 60% are in shopping centres. The difference in overhead is colossal.
Its not, not at all. Retail stores may face higher leases for the site and extra inner city taxes but then the warehouse uses far more energy and water in things like climate control or ASRS operation, then you have the enormous cost of packing or shipping materials. You could probably fit out several stores for the cost of a single ASRS unit too, plus the massive cost of the warehouse construction and everything else.

You are being lied to by these crappy companies making excuses for their shit prices, other retail chains can compete because the costs are not all that different.
 

Angie7F

WiseGurl
Nov 11, 2011
1,704
0
0
I was just in Forever 21 in SHibuya the other day, and had a vivid flashback of when the same building used to be HMV.
I miss the days where "cool" people were walking around the floors of HMV, whereas now young girls are swarming around cheap, disposable clothes.
 

LiftYourSkinnyFists

New member
Aug 15, 2009
912
0
0
The managers of a lot of these retail chains are still pretty old fashioned which is why they seem unable to set up a more realistic and modern business model, I live about half an hour (with no traffic or road works) from my nearest HMV and there's no reason for me to travel when I can have it delivered to my door at a cheaper price.
 

Colour Scientist

Troll the Respawn, Jeremy!
Jul 15, 2009
4,722
0
0
Spot1990 said:
J Tyran said:
Best Grandfather ever?
Clearly you didn't see what the games were.


Only time I ever got to HMV is if I have some spare money I want to blow but I don't know on what. Amazon's great when I know what I want but in an actual physical store I can wander around until something catches my eye.

HMV's prices were actually pretty good here though. Regular enough sales, games were usually about 45 euro while they were 50 in gamestop, I mostly listen to old music anyway so CDs usually cost me about five euro, they had good books, I got 2 Charlie Brooker books, the Pocket Book of Boosh, My Boring Ass Life and a few others for 2 euro a piece. And I could usually pick up 3-5 dvds for about 20 quid.
Yeah, for the midnight release of Halo 4, GameStop were open and HMV were open and they're across the road from each other. Everyone went to GameStop and apparently HMV didn't have one customer in, not one, despite the fact that they were selling the game for 15 euro less. I guess no one knew that part though. I've actually just started regularly checking HMV for games and they're actually a fair bit less expensive.

I get books in there every now and again. They sometimes have three for 12 euro deals or something similar, I also got two seasons of Sherlock for 12 quid, which I thought was pretty decent.
 

Bertylicious

New member
Apr 10, 2012
1,400
0
0
J Tyran said:
Kinitawowi said:
J Tyran said:
You say this as if its a trivial nothing, if you understand the complexity and amount of effort and resources that go into a warehouse you wouldn't be so dismissive. Fun fact, it takes nearly as many staff to run a single loading dock as it would do to run a medium sized store. Depending on the level of automation of course, some could handle it with almost no staff some would need more staff.
Relative to as sprawling a company as HMV, yes it's trivial. Obviously the logistics of warehouse management still take their toll.

A quick Wiki trip tells me that Amazon have maybe eight warehousing sites in the UK, all heavily automated and absolutely none in prime shopping centre or High Street locations. HMV have 230 stores, of which 60% are in shopping centres. The difference in overhead is colossal.
Its not, not at all. Retail stores may face higher leases for the site and extra inner city taxes but then the warehouse uses far more energy and water in things like climate control or ASRS operation, then you have the enormous cost of packing or shipping materials. You could probably fit out several stores for the cost of a single ASRS unit too, plus the massive cost of the warehouse construction and everything else.

You are being lied to by these crappy companies making excuses for their shit prices, other retail chains can compete because the costs are not all that different.
I dunno mate. Running costs on 8 large facilities is going to be trivial compared to 230. See, you've also got the benefit of centralisation; you'd need 230 people to manage the staff in 230 stores, each with around 5 to 20 staff, whereas a warehouse manager could look after an entire shift. It's just a more efficent method of running things.

Plus HMV, with its 230 stores, will STILL need to run 8 (or however many) warehouses, either directly or via contract, so it's just an extra bit of overhead.

I dunno. Perhaps you're right and if you set up a new company to operate in retail in the same sector then maybe it would be possible to make it competative and do better on pricing but HMV are an established company and wouldn't have that luxury. Or at least they'd have a lot of obstacles standing in their way if they did want to restructure.

HMV, like Woolworths, is a relic.
 

Vault101

I'm in your mind fuzz
Sep 26, 2010
18,847
0
0
lacktheknack said:
You kidding me? HMV often put on sales where good, new albums were going for five bucks a piece.

Maybe Canadian HMV is different than Aussie HMV.
I dont think Ive seen HMV..must be my state...

sounds a bit like JB HI FI....I would be sad to see them go...
 

Nickolai77

New member
Apr 3, 2009
2,843
0
0
It comes as no surprise really. HMV can't compete against Amazon based on price, quality or variation in products, it's the nature of the music retailing industry.

Like many people here, i've spent many hours browsing my local HMV store to kill time on family shopping trips, and often walked out empty handed either because the CD i want to buy is too expensive or they simply don't have what i'm looking for in stock.

With HMV gone or in a severely downgraded position, i expect independent retail stores and cheap 2nd-hand chains like CEX to get more people browsing their shops, so i don't think the loss of HMV is all that bad- companies with better business models will step in to fill the vacuum, and hopefully some HMV employees can find work in such places. What i'll miss about HMV though is the predictability of walking into a store and knowing what and where you'll find things, and such stores are usually quite small so there isn't a lot to browse, and with independent stores you don't know what you're walking into. Considering that 30 years ago it was such stores being stamped out of the competition by big chains like HMV, it appears the tables may turn.

If i'm on a family shopping trips and there isn't a HMV or a Game/Gamestation in town the last place of refuge for a man like me is Waterstones essentially- hopefully they can stay in business. They need to be wary about Amazon's kindle and the downloading of digital books, and learn from where HMV went wrong.