The FOOD (& Drink) Thread

hanselthecaretaker

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Speaking of grilled cheese again, I heard on this new show with Jennifer Garner that the secret to a good grilled cheese is using mayo on the bread instead of butter. Figured ok, this is just a show adding some filler personal dialog but what the hell; I’ll bite. So last weekend I slathered on some Hellmann’s Vegan Mayo, added sharp cheddar and Colby Jack and threw it on the skillet.

The first interesting thing was how much slower it cooked, so it really gave the cheeses time to melt nicely while the bread deceptively developed that artery-clogging deep fried look. It could’ve easily handled more heat, but the cheese was oozing and let’s just say it was probably the best grilled cheese I’ve had. Dangerously good, as in I really should look into vegan cheeses too.
 
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Gordon_4

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Speaking of grilled cheese again, I heard on this new show with Jennifer Garner that the secret to a good grilled cheese is using mayo on the bread instead of butter. Figured ok, this is just a show adding some filler personal dialog but what the hell; I’ll bite. So last weekend I slathered on some Hellmann’s Vegan Mayo, added sharp cheddar and Colby Jack and threw it on the skillet.

The first interesting thing was how much slower it cooked, so it really gave the cheeses time to melt nicely while the bread deceptively developed that artery-clogging deep fried look. It could’ve easily handled more heat, but the cheese was oozing and let’s just say it was probably the best grilled cheese I’ve had. Dangerously good, as in I really should look into vegan cheeses too.
There's an episode of Basics with Babbish about the Grilled Cheese, and I really wanted to try the Jalepeno popper cheese one he made. That seemed like it would be pretty awesome.


OT: I have recently discovered sweet potato chips. Normal potato chips are now gonna be an endangered species in my home cos these are fuckin' amazing. Cook 'em in an oven or an air fryer and hit with garlic salt when they're hot.
 
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Kyrian007

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Speaking of grilled cheese again, I heard on this new show with Jennifer Garner that the secret to a good grilled cheese is using mayo on the bread instead of butter. Figured ok, this is just a show adding some filler personal dialog but what the hell; I’ll bite. So last weekend I slathered on some Hellmann’s Vegan Mayo, added sharp cheddar and Colby Jack and threw it on the skillet.

The first interesting thing was how much slower it cooked, so it really gave the cheeses time to melt nicely while the bread deceptively developed that artery-clogging deep fried look. It could’ve easily handled more heat, but the cheese was oozing and let’s just say it was probably the best grilled cheese I’ve had. Dangerously good, as in I really should look into vegan cheeses too.
For me it just depends on what I'm doing with the sandwich. If I'm paring it with tomato or chicken noodle soup, I'm going to be dunking it. So I'm going with mayo. Easier to spread, the melting factor you mentioned, its really good. However, if I'm just eating the grilled cheese. Gotta go with the butter. The taste is just a little better when on display and not a part of the bigger whole. However, I might throw that out the window if the mayo is a garlic aioli. And I haven't tried it yet, but I just saw a youtube video where a guy made some roasted bone marrow mayo. That could be even better.
OT: I have recently discovered sweet potato chips. Normal potato chips are now gonna be an endangered species in my home cos these are fuckin' amazing. Cook 'em in an oven or an air fryer and hit with garlic salt when they're hot.
I find sweet potato too sweet, but I totally get where you are coming from. I found out a while back that the rutabaga for me is a better mix of "sweeter than potato, but not as sweet as sweet potato" vegetable for making chips.
 
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gorfias

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Whatever, Cosmo -

I’ve eaten all these foods, and often at some points. The only way the vast majority would make me “horny as fuck” is eating them off a nice pair of tits or something.
They really need an LOL button on these threads.
I don't think red wine works the way they think it does. Also, 100 proof vodka drunk to excess can have the same positive effect.
After a sideways doc appt in which I was read the riot act, I've been binging home made soup, consisting of a container of fat free low sodium chicken broth, diced vegetables that didn't get eaten last week or a bag of frozen bird's eye, a protein like a can of pre-cooked chicken, or whatever I made for dinner last night that didn't get eaten and seasoning. Add water to have more. But seriously, I'll make a 1/2 cup of dried pasta and keep that separate from the soup, adding per serving (stored in fridge in the soup the pasta will get mushy). Or add some wilted spinach, Italian seasoning and tiny turkey meatballs for a wedding soup. Of flavor with lemon for chicken noodle. Or add beans (white, kidney, black) and chilli seasonings (what I'm eating for lunch today) with some leftover taco ground turkey meat. Pretty satisfying and helping control my weight. I'll keep looking at new recipes for ideas to keep mixing it up.
 
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BrawlMan

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Various foods I've been eating between April and May. Chicken and dumplings with peas. A meal I had a few weeks ago was chicken livers, spinach with mozzarella cheese, and a biscuit. Around the second week of April I believe, I had some yellowtail sushi 🍣 with tempura sushi.

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Kyrian007

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It's... poutine
A new place in my town recently opened, and at my first visit I ordered their poutine patty melt. An open faced burger covered in so much poutine you couldn't see the burger. It was fine, but a little disappointing. I like a french fry that's crisp. Has a little crunch to it. Making a fry into poutine kind of kills that, especially one with as much gravy as this one did, covering every inch of fry and cheese. I think your photo is the superior poutine to the patty melt I had.
 
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Elvis Starburst

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A new place in my town recently opened, and at my first visit I ordered their poutine patty melt. An open faced burger covered in so much poutine you couldn't see the burger. It was fine, but a little disappointing. I like a french fry that's crisp. Has a little crunch to it. Making a fry into poutine kind of kills that, especially one with as much gravy as this one did, covering every inch of fry and cheese. I think your photo is the superior poutine to the patty melt I had.
That sounds... potentially appetizing, but the execution definitely doesn't seem to be there. You mentioned they recently opened, so, maybe they'll work out the kinks.
I appreciate hearing mine looks good! I admit I'm a little bit of a poutine snob. I can appreciate when people try to do different things with it, and adding stuff like pulled pork can be delicious. But generally, there's a few rules that I think more places should follow to make a good poutine.
1. Best practice is to keep it simple. No fancily seasoned fries or other kinds of things that distract unless you know what you're doing with it and are confident in the recipe.
2. Crispy fries, always. Don't let them be too thick. (A&W does poutine, but unless their fries are fresh hot out of the fryer they get too mushy. They're thick too which doesn't help)
3. Have enough gravy to cover most of the fries, but not too much. There should be just enough for you to scoop some up from the plate/box with each bite if desired without there being a puddle at the bottom.
4. Don't skimp on the cheese curds. There should be enough to have one or two decently sized curds per bite.
5. Don't substitute the cheese curds for something else. Replacing them with something like mozzarella is heresy.

Poutine should be so easy, but I've heard of plenty of people getting it and it not living up to expectations... which is a shame. Not all poutine is made equal. but when somewhere gets it right, it's so good. Although, personal taste still comes into play. One of my D&D members doesn't like it, for example.
Weirdly enough, Costco has poutine where I am (though I dunno if it's Canada wide) and it's actually one of the better ones in town. The fries and gravy are quite good, you get tons of curds and fries, and it's $6, which is nearly impossible to beat. Another place's poutine would have to be a bit above average to match it
 

EvilRoy

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Made some fresh mozzarella from scratch. Which is to say, I curdled milk in my kitchen and then abused the remains long enough that they turned into something like cheese.

Its definitely one of those perfect recipes to explain the difference between following a method and being good at a method. Milk, lemon juice and salt are all the ingredients and from there you just have to be good at working them. I'm not good, so I get something similar to the cheap mozzarella you get in ball-form at the supermarket and then you're like "really, 10 bucks for this?". But the neat thing is that I can look at what I did and I can tell that if I tried enough times I really could produce something like you get at a fancy cheese shop without needing to spend like 50 bucks on ingredients and equipment.
 
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Bob_McMillan

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Made some fresh mozzarella from scratch. Which is to say, I curdled milk in my kitchen and then abused the remains long enough that they turned into something like cheese.

Its definitely one of those perfect recipes to explain the difference between following a method and being good at a method. Milk, lemon juice and salt are all the ingredients and from there you just have to be good at working them. I'm not good, so I get something similar to the cheap mozzarella you get in ball-form at the supermarket and then you're like "really, 10 bucks for this?". But the neat thing is that I can look at what I did and I can tell that if I tried enough times I really could produce something like you get at a fancy cheese shop without needing to spend like 50 bucks on ingredients and equipment.
Even the cheap kind sounds great, considering now expensive cheese is in my country. You got a recipe?
 

EvilRoy

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Even the cheap kind sounds great, considering now expensive cheese is in my country. You got a recipe?
Kinda sorta. I've read a lot of approaches and they tend to vary, probably due to the kind of milk you can get locally and technique and such, but this is what I typically do:

Ingredients:

Milk - This should be pasteurized (unless you're comfortable scalding unpasteurized milk yourself), but it shouldn't be ultra-pasteurized and if you can get non-homogonized milk it will help. I usually used homogonized pasteurized milk and it works ok. Use the highest percent milk-fat you can get (skim can still be made into cheese but you get less volume and it won't taste very rich). Species actually doesn't matter, so long as its animal milk. I've done cow, lamb, and goat and they all turned out fine with slightly different flavours.

Citric Acid/Lemon Juice. - One or the other. You need way more lemon juice than citric acid if you go that route. Depending on your milk you may need a fair amount of acid to get it to curdle, but the name of the game is just having enough to get the curds. I use lemon juice because its cheaper.

Rennet - This is the one specialized thing in the recipe. It might be a little tough to find, but I've seen it in a number of grocery stores and online where I live so hopefully you can get it. It comes in either tablet form or liquid form, but it doesn't really matter which one you get.

Salt - You could get cheesemakers salt, but frankly its just the kind of salt they put on large soft pretzels or some pastries and its marked way up. Its that sort of cloudy-white salt crystal that breaks up really easy, and doesn't have iodine.

Equipment:

A big pot
A mixing spoon
Something you can cut very soft material with (silicone spatula, butter knife, whatevs)
Something to seive out the curds from the whey. Strainer, cheesecloth, cullender.
A thermometer
A few bowls probably


Steps:

1. Dump your milk into a big pot. I usually do a 4-Litre jug when I make cheese because the effort to quantity ratio is favourable around there. Too little and its tough to have enough to stretch and work, too much and you have to break it up into batches.

2. Add your acid, at a rate of about 15ml lemon per 250 ml milk. If you use citric acid, keep in mind it is way way stronger, so you'll have to confirm how much to use, but I think its like 2.5ml citric acid per 250ml milk.

3. Heat the mixture to 32 C, gently stirring and add your Rennet. I use two tablets per 4L milk, but the packaging should have directions on how much to go with. The more rennet the more stiff the cheese is. If you add too much rennet you get something more like halloumi than mozzarella (personal experience).

4. Rest the mixture for 5 minutes. It should have coagulated into this mass of curd that is floating in whey. If it didn't curdle there are two routes - you can either add more acid or add some heat to stimulate the reaction. If you don't plan to use the whey then it doesn't really matter if you go a little overboard on acid, but personally I go to a maximum of 25% more acid before chucking it on the heat again. Try not to let the heat get much higher than like 35 C, but generally speaking I find that if I get to the point of needing heat, usually just touching it to the burner sets off the reaction.

- I think this is a milk specific issue. Some brands of cows milk in Canada seem to take way more acid to curdle. I dunno if that's because of homogenization/pasteurization or if some cows are just basic AF.

5. Assuming you got curds, you're now gonna run a knife through the curds to kind of cube them in the pot still floating in the whey. Then, back on the heat, you're gonna raise the temp to about 42 C and just stir for a little while. This tempers the cheese and effects your texture at the end. I think this is where my technique breaks down because I don't get the soft cloudy texture I want, so follow your heart on how much to temper it. Some recipes say to mix it a while, others tell you to take it off the second it hits 42C.

6. Remove the curds from the whey, or visa versa. Traditionally you would use cheesecloth here, but I just use a stainless steel mesh sieve. The amount you get out will effect the qualities of the cheese at the end, but its kind of a finicky thing because you need to get the vast majority of whey out of the system before the cheese will even be willing to form into a ball for you. If you want melty mozzarella then you would try to leave in more liquid, hard mozzarella you leave less.

- There is way more whey in the curds than you may expect. Usually I press the curds for a while, and then dump them in a bowl and just let the whey leak out for a bit.

7. You've got curds that you think are whey free. Awesome, time to test that theory. Pick up the curds and try to form them into a ball. Assuming you can do that without a pile of whey squirting out, you then want to do a stretching kneading motion. I'm sure there's a proper name for this but I really don't know it. Basically its similar to the bread kneading motion where you take the mass in two hands before you, then press up into the middle of the ball with your fingers and pull down on the sides with the heels of your hands, so it looks like a mushroom cap.

8. While kneading you can add your salt. There are two ways to add salt. The first is to sprinkle it onto the cheese as you knead it, and the other is to make a saltwater bath and immerse the cheese in that water while you knead. It might sound like an advanced move to go with the bath but I find it kind of helps, because you heat the bath to about 50C and that keeps the cheese soft and workable while you do your thing. That said, you really need the cheese to be definitely in one solid piece before you put it in the bath or you'll be re-straining it. Salt is always just to taste, so its your call how far to go.


9. And you just keep doing the kneading motion until you have the texture you want. If you don't have the right texture but the cheese won't move, you just heat up the cheese. Either in a saltwater bath or the microwave, or the whey. The more you stretch and knead, the tougher the final cheese will be, so in my case I try to barely touch it, but if you wanted like a stretchy pizza mozzarella you would go for longer and if you decided to make something like halloumi then you would be kneading until it gets really hard.


And there you go. That's everything I do, and I always get at least passable cheese at the end. Refinement of technique will hopefully improve what I get, but I can say at least that if you do the above you'll get something edible. Also you can use the whey as a hydrating drink or cook it into recipes as a replacement for water. It adds protien and has a very mild flavour. The cheese will keep for a few days to a week in the fridge, although the flavour does not improve with age.
 

Bob_McMillan

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Kinda sorta. I've read a lot of approaches and they tend to vary, probably due to the kind of milk you can get locally and technique and such, but this is what I typically do:

Ingredients:

Milk - This should be pasteurized (unless you're comfortable scalding unpasteurized milk yourself), but it shouldn't be ultra-pasteurized and if you can get non-homogonized milk it will help. I usually used homogonized pasteurized milk and it works ok. Use the highest percent milk-fat you can get (skim can still be made into cheese but you get less volume and it won't taste very rich). Species actually doesn't matter, so long as its animal milk. I've done cow, lamb, and goat and they all turned out fine with slightly different flavours.

Citric Acid/Lemon Juice. - One or the other. You need way more lemon juice than citric acid if you go that route. Depending on your milk you may need a fair amount of acid to get it to curdle, but the name of the game is just having enough to get the curds. I use lemon juice because its cheaper.

Rennet - This is the one specialized thing in the recipe. It might be a little tough to find, but I've seen it in a number of grocery stores and online where I live so hopefully you can get it. It comes in either tablet form or liquid form, but it doesn't really matter which one you get.

Salt - You could get cheesemakers salt, but frankly its just the kind of salt they put on large soft pretzels or some pastries and its marked way up. Its that sort of cloudy-white salt crystal that breaks up really easy, and doesn't have iodine.

Equipment:

A big pot
A mixing spoon
Something you can cut very soft material with (silicone spatula, butter knife, whatevs)
Something to seive out the curds from the whey. Strainer, cheesecloth, cullender.
A thermometer
A few bowls probably


Steps:

1. Dump your milk into a big pot. I usually do a 4-Litre jug when I make cheese because the effort to quantity ratio is favourable around there. Too little and its tough to have enough to stretch and work, too much and you have to break it up into batches.

2. Add your acid, at a rate of about 15ml lemon per 250 ml milk. If you use citric acid, keep in mind it is way way stronger, so you'll have to confirm how much to use, but I think its like 2.5ml citric acid per 250ml milk.

3. Heat the mixture to 32 C, gently stirring and add your Rennet. I use two tablets per 4L milk, but the packaging should have directions on how much to go with. The more rennet the more stiff the cheese is. If you add too much rennet you get something more like halloumi than mozzarella (personal experience).

4. Rest the mixture for 5 minutes. It should have coagulated into this mass of curd that is floating in whey. If it didn't curdle there are two routes - you can either add more acid or add some heat to stimulate the reaction. If you don't plan to use the whey then it doesn't really matter if you go a little overboard on acid, but personally I go to a maximum of 25% more acid before chucking it on the heat again. Try not to let the heat get much higher than like 35 C, but generally speaking I find that if I get to the point of needing heat, usually just touching it to the burner sets off the reaction.

- I think this is a milk specific issue. Some brands of cows milk in Canada seem to take way more acid to curdle. I dunno if that's because of homogenization/pasteurization or if some cows are just basic AF.

5. Assuming you got curds, you're now gonna run a knife through the curds to kind of cube them in the pot still floating in the whey. Then, back on the heat, you're gonna raise the temp to about 42 C and just stir for a little while. This tempers the cheese and effects your texture at the end. I think this is where my technique breaks down because I don't get the soft cloudy texture I want, so follow your heart on how much to temper it. Some recipes say to mix it a while, others tell you to take it off the second it hits 42C.

6. Remove the curds from the whey, or visa versa. Traditionally you would use cheesecloth here, but I just use a stainless steel mesh sieve. The amount you get out will effect the qualities of the cheese at the end, but its kind of a finicky thing because you need to get the vast majority of whey out of the system before the cheese will even be willing to form into a ball for you. If you want melty mozzarella then you would try to leave in more liquid, hard mozzarella you leave less.

- There is way more whey in the curds than you may expect. Usually I press the curds for a while, and then dump them in a bowl and just let the whey leak out for a bit.

7. You've got curds that you think are whey free. Awesome, time to test that theory. Pick up the curds and try to form them into a ball. Assuming you can do that without a pile of whey squirting out, you then want to do a stretching kneading motion. I'm sure there's a proper name for this but I really don't know it. Basically its similar to the bread kneading motion where you take the mass in two hands before you, then press up into the middle of the ball with your fingers and pull down on the sides with the heels of your hands, so it looks like a mushroom cap.

8. While kneading you can add your salt. There are two ways to add salt. The first is to sprinkle it onto the cheese as you knead it, and the other is to make a saltwater bath and immerse the cheese in that water while you knead. It might sound like an advanced move to go with the bath but I find it kind of helps, because you heat the bath to about 50C and that keeps the cheese soft and workable while you do your thing. That said, you really need the cheese to be definitely in one solid piece before you put it in the bath or you'll be re-straining it. Salt is always just to taste, so its your call how far to go.


9. And you just keep doing the kneading motion until you have the texture you want. If you don't have the right texture but the cheese won't move, you just heat up the cheese. Either in a saltwater bath or the microwave, or the whey. The more you stretch and knead, the tougher the final cheese will be, so in my case I try to barely touch it, but if you wanted like a stretchy pizza mozzarella you would go for longer and if you decided to make something like halloumi then you would be kneading until it gets really hard.


And there you go. That's everything I do, and I always get at least passable cheese at the end. Refinement of technique will hopefully improve what I get, but I can say at least that if you do the above you'll get something edible. Also you can use the whey as a hydrating drink or cook it into recipes as a replacement for water. It adds protien and has a very mild flavour. The cheese will keep for a few days to a week in the fridge, although the flavour does not improve with age.
Thanks a bunch good sir.
 
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Drathnoxis

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Wikipedia said:
Rennet (/ˈrɛnɪt/) is a complex set of enzymes produced in the stomachs of ruminant mammals. Chymosin, its key component, is a protease enzyme that curdles the casein in milk. In addition to chymosin, rennet contains other enzymes, such as pepsin and a lipase.

Rennet has traditionally been used to separate milk into solid curds and liquid whey, used in the production of cheeses. Rennet from calves has become less common for this use, to the point that less than 5% of cheese in the United States is made using animal rennet today.
One of those situations where you have to wonder, why the heck did someone try this in the first place?! "I'm going to mix this stuff I got out of the stomach with milk and then eat the result."

Species actually doesn't matter, so long as its animal milk. I've done cow, lamb, and goat and they all turned out fine with slightly different flavours.
Does human milk work? Asking for a friend.

Also, how do you make cheddar other than add food coloring?

Edit: Oh yeah, and doesn't the cheese taste like lemon with all that lemon juice?
 
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EvilRoy

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One of those situations where you have to wonder, why the heck did someone try this in the first place?! "I'm going to mix this stuff I got out of the stomach with milk and then eat the result."

Does human milk work? Asking for a friend.

Also, how do you make cheddar other than add food coloring?

Edit: Oh yeah, and doesn't the cheese taste like lemon with all that lemon juice?
To the first, the going theory is that people were using stomachs as canteens or wineskins. So basically somebody put milk in a bag they made out of a cows stomach, and then when it went off it coalesced into a hunk instead of a pile of mush. They presumably ate it anyway for the same reason we have all eaten things like uncooked instant ramen or instant rice in cold water. If it's all you got...

I'm not putting the breast milk question into Google on this device, so Imma guess yes but I'm not confirmed.

Cheddar is a cultured and ripened cheese as opposed to mozzarella being unripened and unaged so it's really just a time thing but with a couple extra steps. You have to add a bacteria to the milk and cook it for longer, then it gets pressed and aged. I think the food coloring is just to help tell it apart from other cheese you would make at the same time.

And yeah, I have made some really lemony cheese before. It's just about the balance - if all the citric acid reacts making curds then the cheese doesn't really take on much of a flavour. Lemon without the acid tastes really weird and faint so it just adds a super mild tang. If you add too much though, the cheese tastes like... I dunno. Imagine drinking unsweetened lemonade while eating cheese. It's not great.
 
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