Things you need for a Tabletop RPG (for the PC players)

Saint of M

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This will be split between players and GM's, but I think there are a few things you need for any given table Role Playing Game. If you have different ideas, put them up here, the best ones will get into a youtube video I will make. Just finished one on the perks of the tableTop RPG, so this will be episode 2.


FOr a short list for new players in any given RPG will need or need to keep in mind.

1. Core Rule Book: Short for CRB, this will have the main rules and abilities, feats, skills, and playable races and classes if available. While other supplementary books can further your fun, but unless you are playing a build of Druid or Ranger with a animal companion so you'll need the bestiary, the other 9/10 times not so much. Buy extras as you see fit. As this is often the size of a text book, a digital version for phone, tablet, or computer is usually also available.

2. Character sheet: This has all your gear, background, and abilities. How much experience you have earned, and how much money to your name. Have several different characters as you might be playing in different groups, and your main character might die a horrible death. Most companies have a free PDF you can download then print out. If you are like me, then you also have a writable one that you find with a quick internet search. I'm not a rediter but I found one on a link on Reddit for my current Pathfinder 2 sheet.

3. Pencil and Paper: You will be changing information game to game either from gear bought, items sold, loot taken, and stats increased due to level. Pencil are easily changeable, pen not so much. you are also going to need to take notes. If you are also like me and write big, or don't want t keep flipping though the book for what thingy A does, write them down in your own words and mar which ones you can do.

4. In the case of Organized play, Chronicle sheets. Organized play is a official world wide campaign, and your characters can do various premade missions to see how well they do and get perks from them. You are bound to get bunch of them so keep them organized

5. Binder with Sheet Protectors. If Point 2, 3, and 4 didn't make this apparent enough. have a few sheet protectors to act as dividers and put in a picture or label that says what your character is, which can also double as something you can have out during the game so people don't keep asking what your character name is.




6. Dice: We are going to be rolling lots of dice. Most will be used for damage, others for other in game events. They will often shortedn do D for dice and their Coresponding number. They are, in order of number of sides.

D4: Looks like a Pyramid.
D6: Most common die used in the world.
D8: Looks like a diamond
D10: Looks like a top
D100: A modified D10, but instead of going up by one 1-10, it goes up by ten 10-100. Used in together with the normal D10, they are often called Percentile dice.
D12: Starts taking a ballish shape. ALso the the highest die used in health (Barbarians normally) and damage.
D20: THe most used die in the game as you will use it for saves, attacks, skills, and so much more. Also a common health counter for Magic the Gathering.



7.The Miniature: Called a Mini for short. THis is a small statue that represents your character on the table. Doesn't have to be exactly what you have in your mind's eye, but it does have to be small enough to not take up alot more space than the other characters take up. Most of us use a lot of official minies from all manner of companies, others use plastic army men, a lot of people I played with use legos. I even used tiny little pokemon toys for the smaller races.

8. If using a computer, a long enough extension cord to get to the wall. I prefer to keep most of my info on the computer, with a writable character sheet. Might also want to use an spreadsheet like

9. Being Respectful: Its a game, but unlike in most online games, you cannot hide under animinity. Be polite. Your character can be boisterous and abrasive as you want, but jerks of any flavor can make a game grating at the best of times. Worse case scenario you can drive away other characters. A good GM will keep the bad elements out as much as they can, but the rest not as much. ALso try not to take up all the space. Most hobby stores don't have alot of it and you might have seven other people and their gear all around you.

Conversely, try not to let the other players get to you if THEY are the pain in the neck. Yes, this is as much me telling myself this as you, but try not to (smiling and being poilight annoys the jerks even more). If the problem doesn't go away, or its more abrasive then anyone should have to put up with (the isms, not taking no to unwanted flirtations or in any meaningful way, just general jerkishness, you pick the level of crap you can take), talk privately with the GM. Most GM's will pick up on this before you need to bring this up and will try and deal with it. Even if they don't, once brought up they will deal with it. If they won't, find another group. Its a game, not actual life and death.



10. Bring money. Many a game store might sell snacks and drinks while others might be close enough to places to get food. IF you get something like a large pizza, a large back of chips, or a think of bread sticks, off it to others before devouring the rest. Other times this will be your chance to buy paints and other gaming stuff. In some cases, a game store might have a table fee for the players (say a dollar) so they can pay for the electricity you will use.

11. Do not pick a fight with the GM. I don't care how much of a jerk they are being, they have the high ground and you are Anikin Skywalker. I am saying you are not going to win.
 
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SckizoBoy

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I personally don't agree with number 11, mostly because no-one likes a jerk or 'that guy' in a gaming setting, whether it's the GM or a PC. If the GM is a jerk and one player is more prone to pushback than the other, then it can get super strained i.e. not fun any more, so the group as a whole need to address it, even if it means cutting the campaign short, not persist with the 'GM is god' mentality.

I would rather replace it with: making sure the GM understands you as a player and as a person so that the GM can tailor the campaign to suit/humour/challenge the personalities of the party (both the players and their characters).

Generally speaking though: battlemap with sharpies (to make things easier for the GM/party to visualise NPC positions/encounter topography); a sense of humour ('cos campaigns tick over with hijinks); and a broad and colourful imagination most of all.
 

happyninja42

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Stuff to bring for a GM:

1. A handful of NPC's of various utility, that can be brought out as needed when your PC's invariably go off on a tangent. Like 2-3 of each type (soldier, information person, driver/pilot, etc) with standard, average stats, a name, and a single paragraph of personality details that you can use to quickly embody them when talking to the party.

2. A handful of locations for above mentioned NPC's to inhabit. Nothing major, but like, a single room tavern/bar, maybe a back alley or something. A convenience store, public library, brothel, Apple smart store, restaurant, strip club (probably get a lot of mileage from that one) etc. Have a few isolated locations in a folder, handy and ready to go, if they decide to make their own plot hooks and go running off.

Just take a good hour or so of pre-game prep work, or just some down time, and make this "In Case of Tangent, Break Glass" folder of filler people and places. You might not use them every game, but when you DO need them, you will be glad you took the time to prepare them, and save yourself time at the table. You don't even really need to do it all at once, if that much grind work bothers you. Just, like every day, spend like 30 minutes, and make an NPC or 2, or a location or 2. And then next day, repeat. After a week or 2, you've got a sizeable selection of options to bring out when needed. Make them minimal on stats. These aren't meant to be long lasting NPC's (though that might change), but just skeleton stats, to fill a specific role for a specific scene. No need to to do a full writeup on them.

3. This is merely fun for extra flavor, but go browse youtube for tracks with names like "Medieval ambient music, dark, 3 hours" , "ambient jungle sounds, 3 hours" or "ambient city sounds, 3 hours" etc. and just bookmark them on your smartphone or tablet. And then if your players are in a location and you want to apply some extra layer of atmosphere, pull up the appropriate track and hit play. The 3 hour thing was just a random number, there or some clips on YT that are literally 10+ hours of the stuff, either looped or just that varied. They're great for background ambiance, and seriously, just about ANY combination you can think of...there's probably a video for it. especially "with rain/thunderstorm" added. Ritual chanting with drums? Got it. Tribal vocals with animal sounds? Got it. So like, if you are running Cyberpunk, and want a cyberpunky background sounds, you can look up something like Bladerunner 2049 ambient with rain, and boom, you've got background sounds that would fit very well. Anything tribal or "ancient" or whatever works well for fantasy setting.
 

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3. This is merely fun for extra flavor, but go browse youtube for tracks with names like "Medieval ambient music, dark, 3 hours" , "ambient jungle sounds, 3 hours" or "ambient city sounds, 3 hours" etc. and just bookmark them on your smartphone or tablet. And then if your players are in a location and you want to apply some extra layer of atmosphere, pull up the appropriate track and hit play. The 3 hour thing was just a random number, there or some clips on YT that are literally 10+ hours of the stuff, either looped or just that varied. They're great for background ambiance, and seriously, just about ANY combination you can think of...there's probably a video for it. especially "with rain/thunderstorm" added. Ritual chanting with drums? Got it. Tribal vocals with animal sounds? Got it. So like, if you are running Cyberpunk, and want a cyberpunky background sounds, you can look up something like Bladerunner 2049 ambient with rain, and boom, you've got background sounds that would fit very well. Anything tribal or "ancient" or whatever works well for fantasy setting.
Or you could go off the rails like me and have a music list with every town/city, dungeon type, battle/boss theme, overworld location, and event/character themes listed with a song hand picked from a game or other source to fit said thing. Background music helps things flow in my mind and aids in my character interactions, and setting the musical tone/theme with it does wonders to help set the scene properly in ways I can't do on my own.

At 12pt font with a basic 3 column grid (For situation, song, and source) my current campaign's music source material is enough to fill 10 pages. Granted, this campaign spans an entire continent's worth of custom material and design, all a new universe that isn't taken or edited from any module. So I have a decent chunk of stuff for various events we may not experience at all (Though most of it will be used)
 
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Saint of M

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I personally don't agree with number 11, mostly because no-one likes a jerk or 'that guy' in a gaming setting, whether it's the GM or a PC. If the GM is a jerk and one player is more prone to pushback than the other, then it can get super strained i.e. not fun any more, so the group as a whole need to address it, even if it means cutting the campaign short, not persist with the 'GM is god' mentality.

I would rather replace it with: making sure the GM understands you as a player and as a person so that the GM can tailor the campaign to suit/humour/challenge the personalities of the party (both the players and their characters).

Generally speaking though: battlemap with sharpies (to make things easier for the GM/party to visualise NPC positions/encounter topography); a sense of humour ('cos campaigns tick over with hijinks); and a broad and colourful imagination most of all.
Discuss, debate, ask pointed questions are perfectly ok. But we all know that one guy, and its usualy a dude, that will be argumentative for argument's sake. I will try to add your thoughts in the matter when I do the vid.

Stuff to bring for a GM:

1. A handful of NPC's of various utility, that can be brought out as needed when your PC's invariably go off on a tangent. Like 2-3 of each type (soldier, information person, driver/pilot, etc) with standard, average stats, a name, and a single paragraph of personality details that you can use to quickly embody them when talking to the party.

2. A handful of locations for above mentioned NPC's to inhabit. Nothing major, but like, a single room tavern/bar, maybe a back alley or something. A convenience store, public library, brothel, Apple smart store, restaurant, strip club (probably get a lot of mileage from that one) etc. Have a few isolated locations in a folder, handy and ready to go, if they decide to make their own plot hooks and go running off.

Just take a good hour or so of pre-game prep work, or just some down time, and make this "In Case of Tangent, Break Glass" folder of filler people and places. You might not use them every game, but when you DO need them, you will be glad you took the time to prepare them, and save yourself time at the table. You don't even really need to do it all at once, if that much grind work bothers you. Just, like every day, spend like 30 minutes, and make an NPC or 2, or a location or 2. And then next day, repeat. After a week or 2, you've got a sizeable selection of options to bring out when needed. Make them minimal on stats. These aren't meant to be long lasting NPC's (though that might change), but just skeleton stats, to fill a specific role for a specific scene. No need to to do a full writeup on them.

3. This is merely fun for extra flavor, but go browse youtube for tracks with names like "Medieval ambient music, dark, 3 hours" , "ambient jungle sounds, 3 hours" or "ambient city sounds, 3 hours" etc. and just bookmark them on your smartphone or tablet. And then if your players are in a location and you want to apply some extra layer of atmosphere, pull up the appropriate track and hit play. The 3 hour thing was just a random number, there or some clips on YT that are literally 10+ hours of the stuff, either looped or just that varied. They're great for background ambiance, and seriously, just about ANY combination you can think of...there's probably a video for it. especially "with rain/thunderstorm" added. Ritual chanting with drums? Got it. Tribal vocals with animal sounds? Got it. So like, if you are running Cyberpunk, and want a cyberpunky background sounds, you can look up something like Bladerunner 2049 ambient with rain, and boom, you've got background sounds that would fit very well. Anything tribal or "ancient" or whatever works well for fantasy setting.
Or you could go off the rails like me and have a music list with every town/city, dungeon type, battle/boss theme, overworld location, and event/character themes listed with a song hand picked from a game or other source to fit said thing. Background music helps things flow in my mind and aids in my character interactions, and setting the musical tone/theme with it does wonders to help set the scene properly in ways I can't do on my own.

At 12pt font with a basic 3 column grid (For situation, song, and source) my current campaign's music source material is enough to fill 10 pages. Granted, this campaign spans an entire continent's worth of custom material and design, all a new universe that isn't taken or edited from any module. So I have a decent chunk of stuff for various events we may not experience at all (Though most of it will be used)
Will add in the GM section as while half of the physical materials needed (books, dice, minies) is basically what was mentioned but much more, there are other qualaties and things needed of the GM that are different from the other 3 to 7 players.

As for music, it depends on where you are. In your home, sure, have whatever music you want. Nothing says you can't have German Techno in a medical village. However some stores will not permit it, and if you are in a library you might also not be able to have it.

I will add that like the samples you two gave, probably have it background or atmospheric as it should add to the experience, not subtract or be a distraction to it.
 

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IDK, about players needing to have any rule books, while it's useful and definitely better if they have one, most of the campaigns I've enjoyed playing most we only had 1 copy for the whole table and they went pretty smoothly, it's not like I disagree and I bought a player's handbook & dice by my 3rd session of playing because I like bring it home and research builds, plus it's really useful for spells but I don't think it's necessary.

Now what I think it should be instead is "Know and prepare your abilities", try to memorise &/or write down what your character can do, while it is irrational to expect them to know everything, I think the player should at least know already everything they're going to be doing most often, and in the case of Spellcasters what I'd expect them to do if they don't have the book is that if your game has an app for spells use that, it's even faster than looking it up in the book and if not, write them down, whenever I play a spellcaster in a game for which I don't know the book I make reference cards, copying the contents of the book and noting the page in which it can be found, so you know if you're not committed to the game enough to buy the book or you simply can't find it or afford it, there are ways to be prepared and to make the session run smoothly.
 
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happyninja42

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As for music, it depends on where you are. In your home, sure, have whatever music you want. Nothing says you can't have German Techno in a medical village. However some stores will not permit it, and if you are in a library you might also not be able to have it.

I will add that like the samples you two gave, probably have it background or atmospheric as it should add to the experience, not subtract or be a distraction to it.
Yes definitely consider your location, though I've personally never done the "public location gaming" thing. It's always been at someone's home around a table. And having music was never an issue because there was noone else to disturb.

And I don't mean blare it at max volume, just having it in the background as a noise buffer, and to provide AHHmbiaaahnce. Given how loud I've heard gamers at my local comic shop get, and nobody seemed to have a problem with it, it seems doable to have music. Granted the music I'm using is wordless, instrumental stuff, that is literally designed to be background, so it can sort of just fade into the back of someone's awareness. But yeah, consider your surroundings and location first.
 
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Saint of M

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IDK, about players needing to have any rule books, while it's useful and definitely better if they have one, most of the campaigns I've enjoyed playing most we only had 1 copy for the whole table and they went pretty smoothly, it's not like I disagree and I bought a player's handbook & dice by my 3rd session of playing because I like bring it home and research builds, plus it's really useful for spells but I don't think it's necessary.

Now what I think it should be instead is "Know and prepare your abilities", try to memorise &/or write down what your character can do, while it is irrational to expect them to know everything, I think the player should at least know already everything they're going to be doing most often, and in the case of Spellcasters what I'd expect them to do if they don't have the book is that if your game has an app for spells use that, it's even faster than looking it up in the book and if not, write them down, whenever I play a spellcaster in a game for which I don't know the book I make reference cards, copying the contents of the book and noting the page in which it can be found, so you know if you're not committed to the game enough to buy the book or you simply can't find it or afford it, there are ways to be prepared and to make the session run smoothly.
Good to add, and I might just edit my origioal post. I do find it easier if you have your own book. Even if you can get alot of the things you need to know off game's wiki, franly it takes one idiot to down the power or the comunication lines on your street.

Yes definitely consider your location, though I've personally never done the "public location gaming" thing. It's always been at someone's home around a table. And having music was never an issue because there was noone else to disturb.

And I don't mean blare it at max volume, just having it in the background as a noise buffer, and to provide AHHmbiaaahnce. Given how loud I've heard gamers at my local comic shop get, and nobody seemed to have a problem with it, it seems doable to have music. Granted the music I'm using is wordless, instrumental stuff, that is literally designed to be background, so it can sort of just fade into the back of someone's awareness. But yeah, consider your surroundings and location first.
Didn't mean to sound too criticle. Most games I have done have been in stores, though the library I used to frequent in Rexburg Idaho had its own D&D books so I am assuming they had games.

I did a few third edition D&D games at my house, and other warhammer games and had music or something educational that fit the setting (Greek Mythology, Urban legends, Medieval history and the like). The one store I was in actualy did ban it, only allowing some when a nearby table had a TPK and several of us started playing some funeral songs on their phone (I had Danny Boy another guy had MY Heart Will Go On performed on a Kazu, it was GLORIOUS!).
 

Elvis Starburst

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As for music, it depends on where you are. In your home, sure, have whatever music you want. Nothing says you can't have German Techno in a medical village. However some stores will not permit it, and if you are in a library you might also not be able to have it.
True. When I DM'd in a game store I was allowed to use music, but had to keep it down a bit. Never DM'd in a library before though. At home, I use a 5.1 surround system in my living room so every player gets an equal amount of sound. Works great for setting the mood with spooky songs!

I also record the audio for our sessions and upload them so the group can listen to it later. Got a mic set up past my DM screen and it works great, picks up the voices and music perfectly
 

Tireseas

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IDK, about players needing to have any rule books, while it's useful and definitely better if they have one, most of the campaigns I've enjoyed playing most we only had 1 copy for the whole table and they went pretty smoothly, it's not like I disagree and I bought a player's handbook & dice by my 3rd session of playing because I like bring it home and research builds, plus it's really useful for spells but I don't think it's necessary.

Now what I think it should be instead is "Know and prepare your abilities", try to memorise &/or write down what your character can do, while it is irrational to expect them to know everything, I think the player should at least know already everything they're going to be doing most often, and in the case of Spellcasters what I'd expect them to do if they don't have the book is that if your game has an app for spells use that, it's even faster than looking it up in the book and if not, write them down, whenever I play a spellcaster in a game for which I don't know the book I make reference cards, copying the contents of the book and noting the page in which it can be found, so you know if you're not committed to the game enough to buy the book or you simply can't find it or afford it, there are ways to be prepared and to make the session run smoothly.
Player Handbook needs vary by the class and the ability for the individual to look up stuff. Spell casters in particular tend to need one just because there's a lot of looking up spells. A workaround I've found, particularly if you have a (legitimately-purchased) PDF copy of a PHB is to print out the applicable pages (generally the class pages) and create a typed-out (or screen-shot) "spellbook" so you have a handy reference rather than having to memorize sometime intricate spells (it also helps for rule refereeing to have the text in front of you).

Online services like World Anvil can also be an alternative as a lot of other users have put in the effort to do things like transcribing spell-lists (particularly for D&D), which can make this faster depending on your information.

One thing to add as an optional item: a laptop or tablet. Whether this is acceptable or not will vary by the DM as some prefer to not have distractions for the players that such devices provide. Others accept the drawbacks in favor of utility (being able to quickly search PDFs, and update sheets on the fly). If you're approaching the table for the first time, try it without a electronic device as much as you can.
 

happyninja42

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Player Handbook needs vary by the class and the ability for the individual to look up stuff. Spell casters in particular tend to need one just because there's a lot of looking up spells. A workaround I've found, particularly if you have a (legitimately-purchased) PDF copy of a PHB is to print out the applicable pages (generally the class pages) and create a typed-out (or screen-shot) "spellbook" so you have a handy reference rather than having to memorize sometime intricate spells (it also helps for rule refereeing to have the text in front of you).

Online services like World Anvil can also be an alternative as a lot of other users have put in the effort to do things like transcribing spell-lists (particularly for D&D), which can make this faster depending on your information.

One thing to add as an optional item: a laptop or tablet. Whether this is acceptable or not will vary by the DM as some prefer to not have distractions for the players that such devices provide. Others accept the drawbacks in favor of utility (being able to quickly search PDFs, and update sheets on the fly). If you're approaching the table for the first time, try it without a electronic device as much as you can.
I think what's more important is to have an understanding of the rules, that is agreed upon by the whole table. And an understanding of your own character's abilities. In reality, in a standard session, about 75% of the information in a corebook, isn't needed at any given time. There is nothing worse in my opinion, than having the table grind to a halt, because someone decided to book dive about what a specific rule is on how to handle something. *in an Archer voice* "Because do you want Rules Lawyer's?! Because THAT'S how you get Rules Lawyers!"

There is a guy who does a star wars related podcast, Order 66 Podcast, and the 3 regular hosts, are all GMs to some degree or other for the genre. And...I think it's GM Chris, has a rule that he always states when starting a campaign (he's posted several of their sessions as downloads from the podcast), and his thing is ""Do not argue with me about something. If we come up on an action that is a bit fuzzy about how the rules should handle it, I'm going to make a call in the moment, and we will stick with it. After the session, we can book dive and see if it's actually covered, and if so, moving forward we'll use that. But don't "Well actually" me in the session, it's disruptive, it slows everything down. I'll be fair with my adhoc rule, I'm not going to try and fuck you over or anything, but I'm going to call it in a way I think is reasonable. ""
 

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I think what's more important is to have an understanding of the rules, that is agreed upon by the whole table. And an understanding of your own character's abilities. In reality, in a standard session, about 75% of the information in a corebook, isn't needed at any given time. There is nothing worse in my opinion, than having the table grind to a halt, because someone decided to book dive about what a specific rule is on how to handle something. *in an Archer voice* "Because do you want Rules Lawyer's?! Because THAT'S how you get Rules Lawyers!"

There is a guy who does a star wars related podcast, Order 66 Podcast, and the 3 regular hosts, are all GMs to some degree or other for the genre. And...I think it's GM Chris, has a rule that he always states when starting a campaign (he's posted several of their sessions as downloads from the podcast), and his thing is ""Do not argue with me about something. If we come up on an action that is a bit fuzzy about how the rules should handle it, I'm going to make a call in the moment, and we will stick with it. After the session, we can book dive and see if it's actually covered, and if so, moving forward we'll use that. But don't "Well actually" me in the session, it's disruptive, it slows everything down. I'll be fair with my adhoc rule, I'm not going to try and fuck you over or anything, but I'm going to call it in a way I think is reasonable. ""
More often than not, it's less "arguing" and more "verifying" in order to maintain consistency. Very often in my games, a DM will ask a player to verify and read aloud the applicable portion (usually during irregular combat actions, such as grapple or high level spells) so that everyone on the table can hear what is said and, to some degree, come to a consensus on a agreed meaning and its applicability, with the DM being the ultimate arbiter. Adhoc rules are fine as long as they're consistent, but consistency requires knowing what is there in the first place.

Either way, it's definitely based on your individual players and DM as to what the preferred approach is. More often than not, combat already grinds items to a halt when something irregular comes up, and I generally recommend that if you're using a spell that is not used constantly (cantrips and your go-to bigger spells like fireball, lightening bolt, and heal), look it up before your turn comes around to make sure it works as you intend it to and be prepared to explain it to the DM and party.
 

happyninja42

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More often than not, it's less "arguing" and more "verifying" in order to maintain consistency. Very often in my games, a DM will ask a player to verify and read aloud the applicable portion (usually during irregular combat actions, such as grapple or high level spells) so that everyone on the table can hear what is said and, to some degree, come to a consensus on a agreed meaning and its applicability, with the DM being the ultimate arbiter. Adhoc rules are fine as long as they're consistent, but consistency requires knowing what is there in the first place.
Sure if the DM specifically taps one of the players to look something up, that's a different situation entirely. I'm referring to the players who decide on their own, to fact check the GM about something, without being asked to, and then piping up ten minutes after the situation is no longer relevant going "Well actually it says X about that thing." That is what I am saying shouldn't happen, because it's just bad form and disruptive. And some players are just incapable of doing that, if there is a book in arm's reach. I know because one of my friends is like this.

Either way, it's definitely based on your individual players and DM as to what the preferred approach is. More often than not, combat already grinds items to a halt when something irregular comes up, and I generally recommend that if you're using a spell that is not used constantly (cantrips and your go-to bigger spells like fireball, lightening bolt, and heal), look it up before your turn comes around to make sure it works as you intend it to and be prepared to explain it to the DM and party.
Even better, have little flashcards that have the details of the ability, and keep them in front of you. In fact a lot of games offer these as side products you can purchase as gaming aids. And I personally love them. Especially if they are the kind of thing where you can only use them like "once per encounter" or whatever. Then you can just put them to the side when they are expended. No muss, no fuss.
 

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Sure if the DM specifically taps one of the players to look something up, that's a different situation entirely. I'm referring to the players who decide on their own, to fact check the GM about something, without being asked to, and then piping up ten minutes after the situation is no longer relevant going "Well actually it says X about that thing." That is what I am saying shouldn't happen, because it's just bad form and disruptive. And some players are just incapable of doing that, if there is a book in arm's reach. I know because one of my friends is like this.
What I do in that situation is to text or message the DM the relevant rule, to inform them, and let them decide how to handle it without involving the whole table. And if they elect to ignore it, they can, and nothing is lost. This is especially relevant when a DM has tweaked a spell or monster ability for their own usage, and don't want to have to explain themselves in order to maintain verisimilitude. One just has to have the restraint to not bombard the DM with these kinds of "updates", especially repeats of the same issue.
 

happyninja42

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This is especially relevant when a DM has tweaked a spell or monster ability for their own usage, and don't want to have to explain themselves in order to maintain verisimilitude.
I find this sentence interesting. So you feel the GM is required to explain themselves when they do something? Because unless you are talking about a jerk GM who is doing something like giving a God Tier nuke spell to a level 1 goblin mystic, just to nuke the party (which would justify a WTF Dude?! reaction), I don't really feel the GM is obligated to explain why a spell/ability works the way they do, for an NPC they've made.
 

SupahEwok

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I find this sentence interesting. So you feel the GM is required to explain themselves when they do something? Because unless you are talking about a jerk GM who is doing something like giving a God Tier nuke spell to a level 1 goblin mystic, just to nuke the party (which would justify a WTF Dude?! reaction), I don't really feel the GM is obligated to explain why a spell/ability works the way they do, for an NPC they've made.
No, you've read pretty much the opposite of what that sentence means. I am saying they shouldn't have to explain themselves, but they will be forced to if, for instance, I bring up that a Night Hag we're fighting shouldn't have the Lightning Bolt spell that was just cast on us. Even if the DM handwaves it by saying "you don't know why" or "this Night Hag is special", the game has been slowed down and a little bit of verisimilitude has been torn away from the other players. A private message keeps things between me and the DM, with the DM free to ignore it, which in and of itself is my answer of "don't worry about it".
 

happyninja42

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No, you've read pretty much the opposite of what that sentence means. I am saying they shouldn't have to explain themselves, but they will be forced to if, for instance, I bring up that a Night Hag we're fighting shouldn't have the Lightning Bolt spell that was just cast on us. Even if the DM handwaves it by saying "you don't know why" or "this Night Hag is special", the game has been slowed down and a little bit of verisimilitude has been torn away from the other players. A private message keeps things between me and the DM, with the DM free to ignore it, which in and of itself is my answer of "don't worry about it".
My point is why are you even bringing up to them the "well actually a Night Hag shouldn't have lightning bolt to cast on us" at all? Whether you do it vocally or via text? That's the point I'm questioning. I mean if you assume the answer will be a handwave of "she's special" or "don't worry about it", why even initiate the question at all? Just figure the GM gave that night hag lightning because they wanted to, either for thematic or narrative reasons, and just play your character?
 

SupahEwok

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My point is why are you even bringing up to them the "well actually a Night Hag shouldn't have lightning bolt to cast on us" at all? Whether you do it vocally or via text? That's the point I'm questioning. I mean if you assume the answer will be a handwave of "she's special" or "don't worry about it", why even initiate the question at all? Just figure the GM gave that night hag lightning because they wanted to, either for thematic or narrative reasons, and just play your character?
That was just a random example. DMs are as capable of making mistakes as players. The question is if they made an unintentional mistake, or have they purposefully modified something? A private message addresses the former without stepping all over the latter in front of everybody else and wasting time.
 

happyninja42

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That was just a random example. DMs are as capable of making mistakes as players. The question is if they made an unintentional mistake, or have they purposefully modified something? A private message addresses the former without stepping all over the latter in front of everybody else and wasting time.
*shrugs* i dunno, suddenly seeing one player fiddling on their phone, and then a "bing!" noise on mine, and then me stopping to actually read it, definitely feels like a waste of time and an interruption to me. might as well just wait until after the session is over and ask them then when it's not an issue.
 

SupahEwok

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*shrugs* i dunno, suddenly seeing one player fiddling on their phone, and then a "bing!" noise on mine, and then me stopping to actually read it, definitely feels like a waste of time and an interruption to me. might as well just wait until after the session is over and ask them then when it's not an issue.
You will do you, and I will do me. I can't recall the last DM I had who wasn't using a laptop.