Venom (2018) Trailer

Kendritch

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Yeah... I don't really know. I don't like the idea of Eddie becoming Venom without the main source of vengeance that caused him to be so angry in the first place... a certain webslinging superhero that goes "Thwip! Thwip!" I really don't like the idea of Venom going after evil corporate executives. It just feels so... generic. I was hoping to see Tom Holland at least cameo in it since it says, "In association with Marvel", kinda like what Suicide Squad did with Batman, but I guess it doesn't necessarily mean "In association with Marvel Studios".

Oh well. Hopefully, I'm wrong and merely judging by a book by its cover.
 

Hawki

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Similar to what the webslinger above me said (who was originally Fallout Boy I think?), this looks generic AF. Movie starring Venom? Sure. Movie where Venom's nemesises are "evil corporate guys" who want to perpetuate "the next step in human evolution?" Yeah...not sold.

At this point, I'm more interested in the possibility of seeing Carnage.
 

Kyrian007

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I saw this trailer in theaters this weekend and I said to myself... I've seen this movie before. Yup, someone should have shown the people behind Venom the Spawn live action movie and what happened to it. That's what this looked like.
 

Neurotic Void Melody

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Whoever's responsible for composing this trailer should probably have given the task to somebody more experienced or talented. The choice of super generic trailer music and awful pacing is ruining what may or may not be an alright film. It show too much yet not enough. The teaser fared quite a bits better even without a venom shot
 

Kendritch

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Xsjadoblayde said:
The teaser fared quite a bits better even without a venom shot
I actually liked the teaser more since it at least followed the dark and gritty tone of Venom as a character. He has all these aggressive emotions buried inside him, and that teaser summed that up very well. It also suggested that the movie's going to be something of a psychological character study. Both good points that left me far more impressed than any Spider-Man trailers I've seen in a while.

Here's the teaser again for reference:

That was a very scary trailer, almost like a horror movie, which is fitting for a Venom movie. He's supposed to be this terrifying monstrous force of nature who will stop at nothing to seek his vengeance against Spider-Man. The "official trailer" I posted in the first post, on the other hand, made him feel more like a misunderstood friendly fellow who doesn't want to attack people, and the symbiote is the one influencing him to do so - which is a bit inaccurate from whom the character really is. Eddie Brock isn't necessarily evil, but he's not some docile softie who only gone bad because of the symbiote either.

The main problem with making Venom (prior to his Anti-Venom days) a good guy is that each of Spider-Man's villains are supposed to reflect the opposite of what Peter Parker would have done with his powers. The notion of choice is a significant theme in Spider-Man stories, and Eddie is one of the many who chose to kill and attack with his powers, thereby polarizing Spider-Man's decisions to use his powers for good. Making Venom a misunderstood good guy is contradictory of that theme.

Finally, one of the things that made Venom so deadly as a villain is that, not only does the symbiote share the same hatred for Spider-Man as Eddie Brock, because Spidey was once host to the symbiote, that alien parasite also knows his secret identity, and Venom used that knowledge to go after Peter's personal life very often. Without the inclusion of Spider-Man, Venom would lose the impact of why he's so notorious among Spidey's rogue gallery all these years. It's not just the muscles and the enhanced strength, it's what Venom represents - a toxic venom created to kill Spider-Man and him alone.

All that being said, there's not much to read from since the trailer, as Xsjadoblayde mentioned, didn't show enough footage for interpretation. But that's just the vibe I'm getting when I saw the symbiote's tendrils attacking those men in suits from Eddie's body. He acted like he didn't want to attack them. I'm just putting my two cents on what it means if my assumption is correct, so I hope you won't be too bothered by my presumptive tirade. lol
 

Xprimentyl

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You folks are welcome to your cynicism; I, for one, think this looks incredible; this is the Venom the screen deserves, then Venom I?ve wanted forever. I?m standing by the statement that I made in the thread I started about this movie:
Xprimentyl said:
?I think Venom can bench press a solo film, but that's certainly a fan's opinion (you have no idea how easily pleased I'll be; if it's just two hours of him just swinging around and slobbering while kicking the shit out of random thugs, no talking, plot or intrigue, I'll still pay see it twice in the theater, in 3D if it's an option.?
Don?t care that the story isn?t the ?real? origin of the character and Spider-Man?s got a thousand movies out there, so his absence will NOT be felt by me (and this is coming from someone who loves Spider-Man.) I?m REALLY excited now. ?WE? are Venom.? Yes, yes, so much yes?
 

thepyrethatburns

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I actually like this trailer a little better. Stress the "little" part because I like the notion of Venom manifesting himself slowly. (Voices in the head, then strange goo powers leading up to "We...Are....Venom") rather than "Goo splattered on me and I'm instantly okay with being an evil Spider-man.".

As for him fighting corporate evil.....hell, that's pretty much every movie in the MCU Phase 1 that isn't called Thor or GOTG so I can't really complain about that either.

I dunno. As I said at the beginning of the year, I'm going to start cutting down on comic book movies. It was one thing when only a couple came out per year but it has gotten ridiculous and life is too short for the stuff that I don't really get into. As such, my current rule is to stop watching those that I didn't really get into on previous movies. Dr. Strange 2 and Ant-man and the Wasp are getting a hard pass. GOTG 3 and Spider-man 2 are in the soft pass category (With the former, I enjoy Drax and Mantis. With the latter, I enjoyed Michael Keaton. Everything else is a skip. As such, I could be convinced on these two.)

As such, on the one hand, I feel like I should give Venom a chance since I haven't seen his first movie. On the other hand, much like that New Mutants trailer, I feel like I'm not really obligated to see something that looks like garbage for the sake of "fairness".

Edit: I just realized that the lack of corporate evil applies to Dr. Strange as well but that movie was so damn bland that I forgot I had seen it. I like Tilda Swinton but even she couldn't save that movie.
 

Xprimentyl

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Kendritch said:
The main problem with making Venom (prior to his Anti-Venom days) a good guy is that each of Spider-Man's villains are supposed to reflect the opposite of what Peter Parker would have done with his powers. The notion of choice is a significant theme in Spider-Man stories, and Eddie is one of the many who chose to kill and attack with his powers, thereby polarizing Spider-Man's decisions to use his powers for good. Making Venom a misunderstood good guy is contradictory of that theme.
AKSHEWLLY, Venom?s/Eddie Brock?s violence and hatred was highly focused on Spider-Man/Peter Parker alone. Unlike most villains, Venom was not evil for evil?s sake; he didn?t hatch elaborate ?evil? plans or covet dominion or power over others. In fact he often protected innocent bystanders when he and Spider-Man would fight, so in many ways, what makes Venom unique is that he isn?t the embodiment of the evil he outwardly appears to be; he?s NOT your prototypical ?villain,? he just really, really, REALLY hates Spider-Man. He?s more the embodiment of acute hatred and his character flaw (the subplot) is the internal struggle between himself (the man) and the symbiote which is evidenced quite nicely in this trailer.

Insofar as complaints that it?s a generic ?opposing yet another evil corporation,? I have to say I like this. Yes, it?s overdone in the grand scheme of things, but it saves Venom having to share his TRUE big screen debut (Spider-Man 3 was utter trash and should be stricken from the annals of cinema history) with other super heroes/villains and turn the film into yet another ?hero porn? vehicle; gives Venom center stage to be the terrifying, slobbering, gooey, toothy, stretchy, growly, merciless beast he is. Then perhaps, in the nigh inevitable sequel, introduce Carnage. And not a challenge to anyone, but if not another super-abled character or an evil corporation, what would have made for a better primary antagonist?

?Just saying I?m really excited to see this film and I shan?t allow doubt and presupposition to snuff that out. Very few films are must-sees for me (can?t think of any in recent memory at all, maybe the first Spider-Man from 2003?), this is the first in that long time that has me feeling like a kid again.
 

Kendritch

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Xprimentyl said:
Kendritch said:
The main problem with making Venom (prior to his Anti-Venom days) a good guy is that each of Spider-Man's villains are supposed to reflect the opposite of what Peter Parker would have done with his powers. The notion of choice is a significant theme in Spider-Man stories, and Eddie is one of the many who chose to kill and attack with his powers, thereby polarizing Spider-Man's decisions to use his powers for good. Making Venom a misunderstood good guy is contradictory of that theme.
AKSHEWLLY, Venom?s/Eddie Brock?s violence and hatred was highly focused on Spider-Man/Peter Parker alone. Unlike most villains, Venom was not evil for evil?s sake; he didn?t hatch elaborate ?evil? plans or covet dominion or power over others. In fact he often protected innocent bystanders when he and Spider-Man would fight, so in many ways, what makes Venom unique is that he isn?t the embodiment of the evil he outwardly appears to be; he?s NOT your prototypical ?villain,? he just really, really, REALLY hates Spider-Man. He?s more the embodiment of acute hatred and his character flaw (the subplot) is the internal struggle between himself (the man) and the symbiote which is evidenced quite nicely in this trailer.
"Internal struggles" aside, the whole reason he appears "unique" is because he stands out as a Spider-Man villain, or as you put it, because he doesn't do all those cliched villain stuff when fighting Spider-Man. In other words, he's only unique because of Spider-Man. Take that factor away, and you're left with the "internal struggle", which I wouldn't exactly say is the most novel concept in movies anyway. You are left with some average guy who has to face his demons, not that "unique" character you were talking about that saves innocents while trying to kill Spider-Man.
 

Xprimentyl

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Kendritch said:
Xprimentyl said:
"Internal struggles" aside, the whole reason he appears "unique" is because he stands out as a Spider-Man villain, or as you put it, because he doesn't do all those cliched villain stuff when fighting Spider-Man. In other words, he's only unique because of Spider-Man. Take that factor away, and you're left with the "internal struggle", which I wouldn't exactly say is the most novel concept in movies anyway. You are left with some average guy who has to face his demons, not that "unique" character you were talking about that saves innocents while trying to kill Spider-Man.
You give Spider-Man too much credit (again, coming from the mouth of a huge Spider-Man fan.) I?d argue Venom?s unique unto his own because of his traits in a vacuum: anger personified and laser focused, anger enough to twist the mind and feed on any traces of goodness within and the struggle to keep that goodness out of its maw all while look friggin? awesome. Having roots within the Spider-Man universe, let alone Spider-Man himself, is not what made him interesting; that?s incidental; Venom would be an amazing character opposite ANY hero, amazing enough that the idea of him doesn?t need to stand opposite anyone? hence his own film.

The internal struggle is exactly why this film can succeed without Spider-Man; it?s something that can be explored and dissected unto its own right, otherwise they really just should have made ?Spider-Man #26? and that?s not what I personally want. This is a film about Venom who, despite being siloed as a villain, is a bit more complex than most other ?bad guys with grandiose-if-vile plots? floating in the stagnant pool of superhero movie oversaturation. By removing the character of Venom from the Spider-Man universe(s), he can be fleshed out: take Average Joe, imbue him with immense power and noble purpose, but at the personal expense of his sanity, self-control and ultimately his humanity. None of that requires strict adherence to a Spidey canon that?s run its course threadbare over the past 15 years, in as many directions, and several Peter Parkers. Is it a unique cinematic theme? No, absolutely not. But the ?idea? of Venom is still an interesting one, one that can be done well if predictably.

This may very well end up being just another hero flick, but despite the overabundance of them, they CAN be done well, and cliched cynicisms aside, least it?s not another Iron Man, another Hulk, another X-men, another Spider-Man, another another Spider-Man, another Superman, another Batman, etc.; at least it?s something DIFFERENT. Plus, I think something to consider is that despite the mind-numbing success of the low-hanging fruit properties like those I listed, I never would have guessed a standalone Venom was in the works; in picking someone so obscure, well, non-obvious, it?s my biggest hope that they go out of their way to make it a worthy and entertaining outing and put him on people?s radars? but for every Deadpool, there?s an Elektra, so I?m cognizant of that. Anyway, judging by that trailer, for all its nit-picky imperfections, ?entertaining? looks to be exactly what they?re doing; when the symbiote crawls over his face to give me those teeth and that tongue, I got goosebumps. THAT?S my Venom and I can?t wait to meet him. Do this justice, Hollywood, and I won?t ask you for SHIT else. EVER.
 

Kendritch

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Xprimentyl said:
You give Spider-Man too much credit (again, coming from the mouth of a huge Spider-Man fan.) I?d argue Venom?s unique unto his own because of his traits in a vacuum: anger personified and laser focused, anger enough to twist the mind and feed on any traces of goodness within and the struggle to keep that goodness out of its maw all while look friggin? awesome. Having roots within the Spider-Man universe, let alone Spider-Man himself, is not what made him interesting; that?s incidental; Venom would be an amazing character opposite ANY hero, amazing enough that the idea of him doesn?t need to stand opposite anyone? hence his own film.
Well, I was just responding in accordance to the context of your previous comment. You mentioned that he's unique because he's a villain who saves innocents and only hates Spider-Man. So let's break those words down. He's unique because he's a different kind of villain. Why is he considered a "villain"? Because he fights Spider-Man. Why is he imbued with hatred in the comics? Spider-Man. So yes, the reasons you've stated for his uniqueness have much significance with Spider-Man.


Xprimentyl said:
The internal struggle is exactly why this film can succeed without Spider-Man; it?s something that can be explored and dissected unto its own right, otherwise they really just should have made ?Spider-Man #26? and that?s not what I personally want. This is a film about Venom who, despite being siloed as a villain, is a bit more complex than most other ?bad guys with grandiose-if-vile plots? floating in the stagnant pool of superhero movie oversaturation. By removing the character of Venom from the Spider-Man universe(s), he can be fleshed out: take Average Joe, imbue him with immense power and noble purpose, but at the personal expense of his sanity, self-control and ultimately his humanity. None of that requires strict adherence to a Spidey canon that?s run its course threadbare over the past 15 years, in as many directions, and several Peter Parkers. Is it a unique cinematic theme? No, absolutely not. But the ?idea? of Venom is still an interesting one, one that can be done well if predictably.
That doesn't work. Because Venom isn't a supervillain in this movie. He's some guy. The very definition of a supervillain means he needs a superhero to fight. Since Spidey's not in it, he's not a unique supervillain; he's just some guy facing internal struggles. So I won't be judging him by the standards of cliched supervillains; I'll be judging him by the standards of cliched cinematic antiheroes, like the ones we've seen countless times.

That said, I do agree to some extent that the idea of Venom as a character living in symbiosis alongside an alien entity can be interesting, and might very well even able to hold an entire movie. But that's only as interesting as this Venom gets, the alien symbiote. All that stuff you said about anger, loss of humanity and sanity? Those are common antihero characteristics we've seen a dozen times. Not interesting or unique, not unless it's connected to Spider-Man, which it's not.

The reason why his anger was interesting was because of how it played off against Peter Parker and his personal life. Spider-Man was the connection for the audience that gave his anger relevancy. It's not just about vengeance against another person - which has been done to death - it's about vengeance against Spider-Man, a character people cared about, and that's the whole selling point of his anger. Otherwise, we would be seeing yet another edgy movie about how revenge will consume you (like we've never heard of that one before). I'd just watch Oldboy or Park Chan-wook's Vengeance Trilogy if I want that. Without that connection to Spidey, without that relationship that defined his character, he's just another average antihero seeking a path of destruction.


Xprimentyl said:
This may very well end up being just another hero flick, but despite the overabundance of them, they CAN be done well, and cliched cynicisms aside, least it?s not another Iron Man, another Hulk, another X-men, another Spider-Man, another another Spider-Man, another Superman, another Batman, etc.; at least it?s something DIFFERENT.
No, it's not another one of those superheroes; it's another Oldboy, another Kill Bill, another "The Crow", another John Wick, another Equalizer. So no, it's not something different; it's still another antihero flick.
 
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Wasn't particularly sold on it for the most part, though its a step up from the first trailer, but damn that final scene really got me kind of hooked. I do kind of like how he flows into place with one of his classic lines like that
 

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I for one would prefer it if the Venom symbiote is portrayed more like it originally was, as a basically good creature, whether he gets royally screwed over in this adaption is up to the writers. Ever since the 90's animated series they've retconned Venom into Satan as black goo, a corrupting influence that will eventually turn even the most saintly person into a total psychopath, usually because they've taken to using it as a metaphor for drug addiction. Since Spider-Man isn't involved they don't have to make the Venom Symbiote inherently evil to keep Peter Parker from looking like a dick in order to reject it in this adaption. I've become a lot less tolerant of the idea that a being that is truly sentient is stuck being Always Chaotic Evil, or Always Lawful Good for that matter lately. Regardless, since they're obviously going anti-hero with this I want one I can actually root for, who isn't either a total prick or an outright villain that the writers seem to want to think the word "hero" applies to them in any fashion or both. If as Eddie says he wants them to in the trailer they have Venom go after and kill only bad guys that'll work just fine.
 

Xprimentyl

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Kendritch said:
Lots of words to miss the points.
Whoo boy, I started to try and dignify some of that misconstruing of my points, but really got exhausted; not going to argue semantics or non-sequitur/circular logical paths. I?ll just leave it at I?m glad they?re doing something different (and finally) with a character I?ve loved for decades, away from the current tiresome, played out, ?shiny and clean? universe of most Marvel films and are doing so without compromising who he is and who I expected to see on screen.
 

Kendritch

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Xprimentyl said:
Kendritch said:
Lots of words to miss the points.
Whoo boy, I started to try and dignify some of that misconstruing of my points, but really got exhausted; not going to argue semantics or non-sequitur/circular logical paths. I?ll just leave it at I?m glad they?re doing something different (and finally) with a character I?ve loved for decades, away from the current tiresome, played out, ?shiny and clean? universe of most Marvel films and are doing so without compromising who he is and who I expected to see on screen.
Except it's not really semantics though. The "argument" was between what you find to be unique and what I don't, what you find to be so "different" and special but I don't. Hell, if that is semantics, every argument about whether if DC movies are just dark and edgy wannabes is over semantics. Every argument over whether if The Godfather is considered a masterpiece is over semantics.

"Compromise who he is"? You mean like compromising the original reason for his creation? I didn't know Venom was created not because of Spider-Man in the comics. Sorry if I missed that point.
 

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I don't like the CGI. It looks cheap, and it makes venom look like The Molded from RE7.

His proportions are too normal and human. He's not bulky enough, not comic booky enough. It's a step up from his design in spiderman 3 but he's still not physically imposing enough. I want him completely dwarfing other people.

It's kind of like when Lou Ferrigno played the Hulk versus the modern version in terms of the size difference between what we have and what I want.
 

Kendritch

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Dirty Hipsters said:
His proportions are too normal and human. He's not bulky enough, not comic booky enough. It's a step up from his design in spiderman 3 but he's still not physically imposing enough. I want him completely dwarfing other people.

It's kind of like when Lou Ferrigno played the Hulk versus the modern version in terms of the size difference between what we have and what I want.
Yeah, that's how I felt too. Before Ruffalo came along and showed us what a truly bulky Hulk can look like, I would have excused Venom for not looking like his comic book counterpart since it might look silly or cartoonish. Now, after Avengers came out in 2012 and showed us how good-looking a bulky oversized comic book character can be, superhero movies have no excuse.