What is the shortest time you've spent at a job before quitting.

JoJo

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Strictly, never. I'm on my fourth job currently but my previous three were all summer jobs on temporary contracts that automatically expired at the end of the season. Fingers-crossed that my current job will be my first that I do decide to quit, rather than them deciding not to be make my contract permanent when I come up for review next March.
 

Colour Scientist

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Jul 15, 2009
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Three months.

My manager was a complete **** and a bully so I found another job and left.

It was such a satisfying day.
 

Something Amyss

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Dec 3, 2008
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I've had summer/seasonal jobs, but those were for a set term so I didn't really quit them.

So...I think two years?
 

Atmos Duality

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Mar 3, 2010
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10 minutes.
Namely, because my employer asked me to do something I explicitly stated I would not do.
As in, I told them directly during the hiring process.
(it was illegal)
 

sky14kemea

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Jun 26, 2008
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Baffle said:
sky14kemea said:
But when some scary lady comes around to everyone asking where her "fuckin' box knife" is, and threatens to stab whoever took it.
What was she going to stab you with? She hasn't got a knife!
I didn't want to find out. She seemed like the kind of woman who knew how to make a shiv...
 

Kuala BangoDango

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ryan_cs said:
The Rogue Wolf said:
When I got fired from my job at Domino's Pizza, I decided to hit up one of the local independent pizzeras that needed a driver. The first night, I saw their delivery map, and that they delivered to all the places Domino's wouldn't... for good reason.

I quit after three hours.
Well that wasn't very informative, and you got me curious too. What's on the map?
Probably Snob Hill (every city has one). Rich people are notorious for giving lousy tips.

I'm kidding of course. :)
 

Imperioratorex Caprae

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May 15, 2010
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2 weeks roughly. I was working at Circuit City during their winding down period, which just happened to also be during the start of Christmas sales season (aka: hell). After my first two weeks, paychecks did not arrive and there was no explanation from any manager except "you need to call corporate" which is not my responsibility. As an employer, it is their responsibility to ensure employees get paid on time, and if not its also their responsibility to find out why employees weren't paid and when said employees will get paid. I called a lawyer friend of mine and asked if they could legally fire me if I walked out until I got paid, he said to just get out while I could and don't worry about going back except for the paycheck. Which I never got, and later CShitty went Chapter 11.
Funny thing they tried to call me back in because I was on PC sales and had sold more computers than anyone else because I was fucking honest with the customers... I even had a manager say "wow, that actually works?" when I told him how I was able to sell so well.
I didn't like working there anyway as their "tech" department was nothing more than idiot sales people who did their "diagnosis" by programs and manuals with no understanding of how to tell a hardware fault and a software issue, no concept of how to remove malware/viruses beyond "wipe and reinstall" and just general stupidity. The car stereo install department was also extremely incompetent, actually setting a car on fire because they fucked up the wiring in the dash, door and trunk.
So fucking glad I walked out of there.
 

IceStar100

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Me a day

Un-armed security officer. Min wage have to pay for my own gear and training. That 400 from my pay for uniform. A black button up shirt does not cost 400. Has pet officer who show up late and I get yelled at because I start calling in. I left that day and never came back.
 

SKBPinkie

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Baffle said:
What was she going to stab you with? She hasn't got a knife!
Still not a risk worth taking, in my opinion. Cause you might end up making the news -



Update :
sky14kemea said:
I didn't want to find out. She seemed like the kind of woman who knew how to make a shiv...
See?
 

DanielBrown

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Dec 3, 2010
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Only left one job so far and I was there as an extra worker for four months. Was never actually hired, so I just stopped going.
That job was fucking awful. It was a package delivery job for a company that drove out stuff for IKEA. Heavy as hell(we didn't get anything to help lift the boxes and the heaviest thing I got was at 110 kg) and stressful as fuck. The pay was the best I've had so far, but the bonus for working weekends and late nights was shit and they always wanted me to do the weekends, which are the worst days by far. Those shifts lasted at least 11 hours, so all you could do the whole weekend was work and sleep. Getting multiple delivieries with "six stairs, no elevator" for 1000+ kilos wasn't uncommon.
The only fun part of the job was meeting the customers. Most often they were really nice and I enjoyed talking to them.

I'm glad I finally found something new.

Edit: Oh yeah, they also attempted to cheat me out of my pay check once. Somehow they thought I wouldn't notice over a third of my salary missing. It was after that I stopped going come to think of it.
 

Neverhoodian

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Two months. I applied for UPS earlier this year because it's a union company with good benefits. Also, my father happens to work there (he's on the verge of retirement now). Too bad the center I worked at was batshit crazy.

First off, I was never properly trained. I got some musclehead who wouldn't tell you how to do something properly, only to bark at you when you did it wrong. It didn't help that other supervisors and drivers had their own conflicting methods they wanted me to use, meaning I was frequently second-guessing myself. The workload was insane as well. Boxes came down the belt so fast that you couldn't keep up. Nobody could. I had to work through my breaks in an attempt to catch up, and I STILL wasn't able to meet their insane numbers.

The breaking point was misroutes (e.g. sticking a package in the wrong truck). I was routinely assigned three trucks to load simultaneously, each with a carry capacity of 800 packages (and they were ALWAYS filled to the brim). Loaders are not allowed a single misroute. Not one. Every time a loader gets a misroute they're pulled aside and read the riot act the next day. One morning I was told that my misroutes were becoming an issue (one or two per day, the horror!), and at this point it wasn't looking good for me staying on. The supervisor finished with a snide comment about me "not sleeping well tonight."

Turned out that little remark was prophetic. That night I worked myself into a frenzy thinking about my job. In the midst of it all, I had a sudden moment of clarity. I knew that if I were to go back to that place, I'd probably lash out and do something I'd regret later. I called up the center early that morning and told them I wasn't coming to work that day, or any other day for that matter.

I knew I did the right thing as soon as I had hung up. When I told my dad about it he understood completely. He's been working at UPS for decades, and he says the job is far more stressful for new hires now than when he first got on. Indeed, he told me that he probably would have quit after three days if he were in my spot.
 

Tuesday Night Fever

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Shortest for me was six months as a full-time sales associate at a Best Buy store in the Portable Electronics department.

I left for a few reasons...

1. My department was hilariously over-staffed between both regular employees and the seasonal ones. As a result the supervisors were trying to split up hours so that everyone would have at least a few per week. Some of the seasonal people were only coming in for like 2-hour shifts maybe twice per week. Even the full-timers like myself were feeling the sting, as my 40 hours per week had been cut down to 32.

2. My department was working with the idea of broadening everyone's skillsets so that if someone from Digital Imaging had to call out sick, they could have someone from, say, CarFi cover for them. Great idea, in theory. Problem was that they weren't actually training anyone on the new products. I was hired specifically to sell video games, movies, and music. I originally applied as a cashier, but I off-handedly mentioned my frankly obscene media collection to the interviewer, and he asked if I'd work in Media instead with an increase in pay over the cashier position. So now they were sticking me in CarFi despite me knowing NOTHING about car sound systems and GPS systems and whatnot. I got really fucking tired of looking like a dumbass in front of customers because I didn't know shit about the department. When I brought that up to a manager he suggested that I read up on the products (which I give zero shits about in that department) on my own time, unpaid. Fuck. That.

3. My sister had mentioned that a position was about to open up at the company she worked for, and she thought it'd be a good fit for me. It paid (significantly) better than Best Buy, had guaranteed hours that were constant from week to week, had regular pay increases and bonuses, was a 30 minute shorter drive from my home, and best of all, has customers that are actually friendly. My time at Best Buy made me hate people, just in general. I seriously just don't understand what turns normal, well-adjusted human beings into raving lunatics the moment they enter a retail environment, and I don't understand what it is that makes them think it's okay to treat sales associates like shit.
 

The Rogue Wolf

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ryan_cs said:
Well that wasn't very informative, and you got me curious too. What's on the map?
Barbas said:
That piqued my interest. I would also like to hear of these forbidding places.
The independent place delivered to neighborhoods that were unsafe. As in "gang shootings were a regular occurence" unsafe. And considering that one of the places I did deliver to was "the projects" and I was only robbed twice in four years (once by knife, once by gun) I trusted my "danger sense" enough to not want to risk it.
 

Barbas

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The Rogue Wolf said:
ryan_cs said:
Well that wasn't very informative, and you got me curious too. What's on the map?
Barbas said:
That piqued my interest. I would also like to hear of these forbidding places.
The independent place delivered to neighborhoods that were unsafe. As in "gang shootings were a regular occurence" unsafe. And considering that one of the places I did deliver to was "the projects" and I was only robbed twice in four years (once by knife, once by gun) I trusted my "danger sense" enough to not want to risk it.
It's pretty disgraceful that they didn't see fit to even warn you that you'd be delivering to those places and risking your life in doing so.
 

cathou

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Apr 6, 2009
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6 hours.

i was working for MDG, a rather big computer company in canada. my first day was my training. basically, the manager told us : the ads we put in news paper, you cannot sell anything that is in it, is someone insist, you say it's backorder.

then a little bit after he said : "when you sell a computer, tell the client he need an upgrade on the network card, the base card is a network card, but the better is an internet card, which cost more." i said "but it's the same thing" and "he said no it's not".

then he explain that each store have 4 sell person on the floor. numbered 1 to 4. there's also a dispatcher that greet every client. the dispatcher dispatch the clients. so each time a client enter, it goes to number 1. if a second enter, if number 1 is still with a client, it goes to number 2, but if number one is finished, it goes again to number 1. so, when you're number 4, you got on client if there's 5 in the store at the same time.

the trick is that each week, the employe that closed the most deal in percentage go up one spot, the one that close the less goes down one spot. but it's the percentage. so number 1 that see 30 clients in a week have to close 15 to have a 50% rate. while number 4 that see 4 clients in a week only need to close 2 to have the same percentage.

so after my first day, i quit saying that i had too much ethic to work there.


edit : Woohoo, 1000 posts ! :)
 

TWRule

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Neverhoodian said:
Two months. I applied for UPS earlier this year because it's a union company with good benefits. Also, my father happens to work there (he's on the verge of retirement now). Too bad the center I worked at was batshit crazy.
Ha - mine was Fedex Ground, I lasted only 3 weeks. That was more than most though - they hire around 20 people a week, and everyone from my group quit the first night except me (I was desperate for cash at the time). Funny - our 'training' was just some manager explaining to us how far behind UPS Fedex was in volume of packages handled annually (though you wouldn't know it while working the belt). To make up the difference they worked us like indentured servants, without the union benefits.

First off, I was never properly trained. I got some musclehead who wouldn't tell you how to do something properly, only to bark at you when you did it wrong. It didn't help that other supervisors and drivers had their own conflicting methods they wanted me to use, meaning I was frequently second-guessing myself. The workload was insane as well. Boxes came down the belt so fast that you couldn't keep up. Nobody could. I had to work through my breaks in an attempt to catch up, and I STILL wasn't able to meet their insane numbers.
Yep, same with Fedex. Except when they hired me, they told me I was going to be the guy that sorts packages by zipcode and nudges them onto the right conveyor belt (the relatively easy job), but when I showed up the first night and asked for directions, they told me I was going to load the trucks from the belt (this was minutes before the shift began). I hadn't received any direction whatsoever for either job anyway - I had to dive right in and learn as I went, which resulted in a lot of mistakes, all of which I was verbally abused for right off the bat by both the managers and the other workers along the belt, who had to deal with packages I missed. Not that I would have gotten them all if I had known what to do - they came off the belt so fast it was physically impossible to read off the zipcodes, get them off the belt and on or near the truck, and get back before another package belonging to one of your stops passed by (not to mention that you eventually had to scan each with this pos armband scanner and place it in a specific corner of the truck based on zipcode). I almost broke down into tears during my first shift it was so bad. I went to the manager who interviewed me during the hiring process, asking about the job I was originally hired for, and he also verbally abused me (a sudden drastic change from the friendly guy of a few days prior). I was so desperate that I stayed on anyway.

I stayed late for hours on every shift to finish - they wouldn't let me leave until I finished loading everything, no matter how long it took (and the driver would sit there cursing me to hurry up during that time). I couldn't physically handle working through the one short break I got each shift - though I found out later they were giving us illegally short breaks anyway (~5-7 mins instead of 15 once per 5 hour shift [which would always end up being 7 hours for me]). I was always so delirious from exhaustion that I didn't notice.

The breaking point was misroutes (e.g. sticking a package in the wrong truck). I was routinely assigned three trucks to load simultaneously, each with a carry capacity of 800 packages (and they were ALWAYS filled to the brim). Loaders are not allowed a single misroute. Not one. Every time a loader gets a misroute they're pulled aside and read the riot act the next day. One morning I was told that my misroutes were becoming an issue (one or two per day, the horror!), and at this point it wasn't looking good for me staying on. The supervisor finished with a snide comment about me "not sleeping well tonight."
Thank God I usually only was responsible for one or two (large) trucks per night - I can't imagine 3...but Fedex's rules were a bit different for misroutes; if the package didn't get delivered properly, you would find it sitting there in your truck the next night, and you'd be held responsible for sorting that along with your normal load for the night (which was always at least the maximum capacity of the truck, if not more - not even including a 'flex' which is a rule where anyone on the belt can ask you to accommodate up to an extra 100 packages if they want because they can't fit them in their truck, even if yours is already full to capacity [somehow I was never given this option to 'flex' to others myself]). Additionally, if less than 99 percent of the total packages for the entire facility handled on a given night were misroutes, a random person working on the belts was fired (not necessarily the person most responsible for the misroutes, or I probably would have been fired quickly). They reminded everyone of that second rule at the start of every shift - you know, for morale building.
Turned out that little remark was prophetic. That night I worked myself into a frenzy thinking about my job. In the midst of it all, I had a sudden moment of clarity. I knew that if I were to go back to that place, I'd probably lash out and do something I'd regret later. I called up the center early that morning and told them I wasn't coming to work that day, or any other day for that matter.
For my part, I lived in constant dread of having to go to work for the time I was at Fedex. I was in college at the time too, but I was so tired I would either sleep in and miss class, or drag myself to school and end up sleeping in class. Ended up doing terribly that semester and having to spend the following semester on academic probation (unable to take normal classes) as a result.

One day, I came in to work, walked up to my truck about 5 minutes before the shift, and it was nearly full of packages, all because the truck hit a bump in the road or something and they fell into the areas of the truck assigned to the wrong zipcodes, and so weren't delivered (and/or someone decided to flex me a couple orders before my shift even started). I knew that shift was going to be a nightmare, and I snapped right there and quietly walked out without saying a word to anyone.
I knew I did the right thing as soon as I had hung up. When I told my dad about it he understood completely. He's been working at UPS for decades, and he says the job is far more stressful for new hires now than when he first got on. Indeed, he told me that he probably would have quit after three days if he were in my spot.
Funny you say that, because I noticed that the only people working alongside me at Fedex were people who had either been there for their whole lives basically, or people who had been there a matter of days like me. Yet the managers were all not much older than me (I was 18 at the time, they were probably late 20s), and they had the cushy jobs of just telling everyone to work faster and harder while not lifting a finger themselves, meanwhile people 30 years their senior broke their backs every night for chump change. I can't imagine being there that long; I'd sooner kill myself - no exaggeration.

Fedex eventually called me a couple days after I left, and I told them where to send my last paycheck, and that's it. I also told my dad, and he was pissed at me (because he knew I needed money and had been without a job for awhile before Fedex). He didn't know what it was like, so he thought I was just being a lazy good-for-nothing. I had to borrow money from my mom to pay rent for the next month before I got a decent job. That was fine though - it was like the weight of the world was lifted from my shoulders the moment I finally worked up the nerve to quit.

Also, I received a letter sometime later telling me I could claim a few bucks as part of a class-action lawsuit against Fedex for those illegally short breaks I mentioned earlier.

I guess what I'm saying is, I know your pain.
 

DrunkOnEstus

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3 days. It was a "weekend warrior" shift where I was to work at a metal factory 12 hours a day from Friday-Sunday, then have 4 days off.

Sounded good, but holy fuck. The factory was 120+ degrees F, with no air conditioning or fans. On 2 of the 3 days, there wasn't really any work prepared for me to do and I ended up vacuuming out the inside of furnaces in a really heavy suit that had only been turned off recently. On the third day, I had to pull cogs that had just been lifted out of near-boiling oil, and even with 4 gloves on each hand they got burned rather badly with a ton of calluses. We had one 15 minute break in the middle of the shift, with a 10 minute round-trip walk to the break area (and it wasn't even worth the time to get out of the heavy suit on those days).

Needless to say, I walked out on Sunday night and said "to fucking hell with that" as far as coming back next weekend was concerned.