Yes, this is real. A LEGO Bugatti Chiron that DRIVES!

Lil devils x_v1legacy

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Yea, it only goes 18mph, but still this is insane.

Lego says this is the first time it has built a fully functional, self-propelled, life-size car, and that this is its most complex non-glued Technic model. The team at the company's Klando factory in the Czech Republic started this labor of love (and probably frustration) in June 2017. They did have to rely on a few conventional building techniques, including a steel frame to support the 3,300-pound finished model and provide a solid connection point for the original Chiron wheels.
https://www.wired.com/story/lego-bugatti-chiron/

I was all impressed with my kingdom building until I saw this. Though they have an actual factory to do it and I just use a spare room utilizing used parts...
 

Pseudonym

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So you can build a vehicle that can outspeed me on a bycicle with lego's. That's pretty impressive.
 

Scarim Coral

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While I know that is super awesome and all but man, sitting in that LEGO car must be super stiff! Also yes I know the speed is slow but getting a car crash in that means instant death!
 

Thaluikhain

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That is an annoyingly over the top video, especially the music. But...huh.

Also, I'd be interested in how substantial the steel frame is, cause you're taking liberties with "made from Lego" there.
 

Lil devils x_v1legacy

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Thaluikhain said:
That is an annoyingly over the top video, especially the music. But...huh.

Also, I'd be interested in how substantial the steel frame is, cause you're taking liberties with "made from Lego" there.
Considering it was actually Lego who built it and made their own frame, it is 100% made by Lego.. They just get to do what they want vs the rest of us who have to use existing parts. Lego has always had some metal parts in the past so it is not out of the norm for them to utilize metal here.
 

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Lil devils x said:
Lego says this is the first time it has built a fully functional, self-propelled, life-size car, and that this is its most complex non-glued Technic model. The team at the company's Klando factory in the Czech Republic started this labor of love (and probably frustration) in June 2017. They did have to rely on a few conventional building techniques, including a steel frame to support the 3,300-pound finished model and provide a solid connection point for the original Chiron wheels.
Wait- this is their "most complex non-glued Technic model"? Are we to infer from this that if the glue gets broken out, it gets more complicated than an actual functioning car?
 

Lil devils x_v1legacy

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Recusant said:
Lil devils x said:
Lego says this is the first time it has built a fully functional, self-propelled, life-size car, and that this is its most complex non-glued Technic model. The team at the company's Klando factory in the Czech Republic started this labor of love (and probably frustration) in June 2017. They did have to rely on a few conventional building techniques, including a steel frame to support the 3,300-pound finished model and provide a solid connection point for the original Chiron wheels.
Wait- this is their "most complex non-glued Technic model"? Are we to infer from this that if the glue gets broken out, it gets more complicated than an actual functioning car?
I think the fact that it is not glued and people are riding in it is the scariest part about this.

Maybe they only use glue when they build an airplane? Helicopter? Space shuttle?
 

Addendum_Forthcoming

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Yeah, but if they're using chains for locomotion as well, rather than a conventional car drive shaft, I'm willing to bet even at only 18mph the total newtons that the car will be under will shake and tear itself apart as soon as you hit the brake.

The fact that it moves will be less impressive than whether it would survive sudden deceleration.

Unless you're planning to Fred Flintstone it... I'd bet that whatever brake it has is primarily a clutch disengaging engine torque and predominantly weight and wheel traction to roll to a stop. $10 says as soon as that vehicle hits a downward slope, no native brake system will stop it.

I'm imagining a inbuilt dual clutch and brake. And then gluing the shit out of whatever mechanical calipers to provide pressure against a disc brake. But if there was legitimately any real pressure on the disc and dual dry clutch and brake it would tear itself apart.
 

Lil devils x_v1legacy

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Addendum_Forthcoming said:
Yeah, but if they're using chains for locomotion as well, rather than a conventional car drive shaft, I'm willing to bet even at only 18mph the total newtons that the car will be under will shake and tear itself apart as soon as you hit the brake.

The fact that it moves will be less impressive than whether it would survive sudden deceleration.

Unless you're planning to Fred Flinstone it... I'd bet that whatever brake it has is primarily a clutch disengaging engine torque and predominantly weight and wheel traction to roll to a stop. $10 says as soon as that vehicle hits a downward slope, no native brake system will stop it.

I'm imagining a inbuilt dual clutch and brake. And then gluing the shit out of whatever mechanical calipers to provide pressure against a disc brake. But if there was legitimately any real pressure on the disc and dual dry clutch and brake it would tear itself apart.
According to Lego , No glue was used. It is a non glued operational Technic model.
 

Addendum_Forthcoming

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Lil devils x said:
According to Lego , No glue was used. It is a non glued operational Technic model.
Okay, yeah... it's going to tear itself apart attempting a sudden deceleration or acceleration. 3300 lbs ... so that's about 1.5 metric tons x 10M/s? ... assuming a .8 second total deceleration event... yeah, bugger off. Plastic and cheap, flimsy sheet steel won't take that.

It'd tear itself apart... either the engine torque or however they made a potential brake system. 'Drive' in the loosest possible definition.

If I can damage my cousin's spawn's lego with my feet stumbling to the toilet at night, it's going to fucking break trying to stop 1.5 metric tons moving 18mph. If foot > Lego at a 4AM shamble with 65kg ... 1.5 metric tons is bigger than a fully grown saltwater crocodile slamming into it.