Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War Maxes Out at 250GB Install

Ezekiel

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I’ve always gotten the impression DTS-MA was higher quality than True HD. It seemed usually I had to turn the volume up a couple notches higher with the latter, and judging purely by bit rate it always fell short.
Well, it's not like there's a choice. The disc has either TrueHD or DTS-HD MA, never the same audio track in both. If you get rid of the TrueHD, you're left with Dolby Digital (AC3), which is 640 kbps at most. Haven't done enough tests to see if I can tell a difference between Dolby Digital and Dolby TrueHD, but even if I couldn't I'd probably still keep the TrueHD, just in case I can't tell that I can tell the difference, maybe at louder spots in the movie I didn't check. Those files are huge, though. I've seen some TrueHD tracks with bitrates over 9,200 kbps, especially Atmos. Games have the benefit of just being downloaded, so the devs have no excuse not to include compressed options.
 

Dalisclock

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In RDR2’s case it’s just a massive game in general.
Red Dead Redemption 2's recording sessions began in 2013 and lasted a total of 2,200 days, led primarily by motion capture director Rod Edge. The game features 1,200 actors, 700 of whom share the game's 500,000 lines of dialogue.[1] In addition to using motion capture to record the performances, Rockstar Games also used cameras to record their facial reactions for later animation;[2] a total of around 60 or 70 cameras were used.[3] The motion capture sets were typically accurate to the dimensions of the in-game setting, which could be demonstrated in a previsualization format.[3] The secretive nature of Rockstar's development meant that Edge and the actors were unsure about the future of the characters during production;[4] the writers continued to work on the script while the actors shot their scenes in segments.[3]


Nearly all of the side quests are also available playing as second character, so there are dozens of them with multiple cutscenes that all had to be recorded twice. That’s just dialog, let alone all the textures, music, etc.
There's also side quests and little points of interest with little mini-stories all over the damn map, so much that youtubers are still discovering them. It's not "bandit camp #32"either, it's entire buildings and NPCs which have been placed and given lines and such.

And there's a bunch of stuff that was left in the files but never actually implemented, like some of the towns in Mexico(which you can't legally get into but the landscape is detailed all the same). Hell, Guarma is apparently detailed enough that if you glitch past the invisible sniper to explore the rest of the island(which is quite big), you can traipse all over the map and find wildlife that exists nowhere else in the game.

Seriously, the game is huge.
 

hanselthecaretaker

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There's also side quests and little points of interest with little mini-stories all over the damn map, so much that youtubers are still discovering them. It's not "bandit camp #32"either, it's entire buildings and NPCs which have been placed and given lines and such.

And there's a bunch of stuff that was left in the files but never actually implemented, like some of the towns in Mexico(which you can't legally get into but the landscape is detailed all the same). Hell, Guarma is apparently detailed enough that if you glitch past the invisible sniper to explore the rest of the island(which is quite big), you can traipse all over the map and find wildlife that exists nowhere else in the game.

Seriously, the game is huge.

Wonder if that's where these folks were -

 
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hanselthecaretaker

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Well, it's not like there's a choice. The disc has either TrueHD or DTS-HD MA, never the same audio track in both. If you get rid of the TrueHD, you're left with Dolby Digital (AC3), which is 640 kbps at most. Haven't done enough tests to see if I can tell a difference between Dolby Digital and Dolby TrueHD, but even if I couldn't I'd probably still keep the TrueHD, just in case I can't tell that I can tell the difference, maybe at louder spots in the movie I didn't check. Those files are huge, though. I've seen some TrueHD tracks with bitrates over 9,200 kbps, especially Atmos. Games have the benefit of just being downloaded, so the devs have no excuse not to include compressed options.

Yeah I only meant between the two formats I've always thought discs encoded with DTS-HD MA sounded better even though it's impossible to compare the same movie. The Dark Knight is probably one of the better examples of True HD but the vast majority of what I've heard using DTS-HD MA still sounded like it had more body, let alone being a bit louder. The bitrates were almost always quite a bit higher too.

I don't have an Atmos setup for upper reference speakers but do feel it's a noticeable step up from True HD regardless, coming through the speakers I have (up to 7.2). I haven't heard enough of DTS-X to really compare since I haven't bought many movies at all the last couple years. Not sure if that has taken off much yet. Wouldn't be surprised if it's a similar case there as well though.
 

Ezekiel

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Yeah I only meant between the two formats I've always thought discs encoded with DTS-HD MA sounded better even though it's impossible to compare the same movie. The Dark Knight is probably one of the better examples of True HD but the vast majority of what I've heard using DTS-HD MA still sounded like it had more body, let alone being a bit louder. The bitrates were almost always quite a bit higher too.

I don't have an Atmos setup for upper reference speakers but do feel it's a noticeable step up from True HD regardless, coming through the speakers I have (up to 7.2). I haven't heard enough of DTS-X to really compare since I haven't bought many movies at all the last couple years. Not sure if that has taken off much yet. Wouldn't be surprised if it's a similar case there as well though.
I only mentioned Atmos because it is TrueHD. You might be right about Atmos being louder. I don't know.

Atmos and DTS:X are nice, but I wish more movies had the original audio. Scarface, for example, sounds better in DTS 2.0 than in DTS:X and DTS-HD MA 7.1. The multichannel audio sounds... overcooked and too deep. Dialogue is quieter, from what I remember, and the club scene has the music coming more quietly from the surrounds and not enough from the front.

I just realized that Scarface is one of the movies I listened to incorrectly in DTS 2.0 early this year. Because the movie was originally released in four track Dolby Stereo, I should have decoded the DTS 2.0 matrixed surround in DTS Neural X, not Direct. I didn't know how this worked until a few months ago. Still sounded better than the redone audio tracks, though. Annoying that packages and menus never tell you if it's matrixed surround.
 

laggyteabag

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I remember when Max Payne 3 was like 40GB, and that was just yikes.

I don't think that I even have a (working) SSD that is big enough for this game.

On a somewhat related note, I am really interested to see how long the SSDs last in the next-gen consoles, because the PS5 one is about 850GBs, which wont last very long at all, if games end up being even half this size.
 

Ezekiel

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I remember when Max Payne 3 was like 40GB, and that was just yikes.

I don't think that I even have a (working) SSD that is big enough for this game.

On a somewhat related note, I am really interested to see how long the SSDs last in the next-gen consoles, because the PS5 one is about 850GBs, which wont last very long at all, if games end up being even half this size.
I still install almost all my games to a mechanical drive. Not like an SSD actually improves performance. Just load times. I saw someone in a thread who called mechanical drives "spinning rust" and said that even his NAS is made of SSDs. Why???? When you get to the amount of storage that you need a NAS, solid state becomes ridiculously expensive. You could either pay 500 dollars for something like the 4 TB Samsung 860 SSD or 305 dollars for the 12 TB Western Digital Red mechanical drive, and that much cheaper mechanical drive with three times the storage will last you for years and years. I'm still using the 3 TB Seagate Barracuda I bought like eight years ago, and I've done so many writes to it. I use it all the time.
 

hanselthecaretaker

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I still install almost all my games to a mechanical drive. Not like an SSD actually improves performance. Just load times. I saw someone in a thread who called mechanical drives "spinning rust" and said that even his NAS is made of SSDs. Why???? When you get to the amount of storage that you need a NAS, solid state becomes ridiculously expensive. You could either pay 500 dollars for something like the 4 TB Samsung 860 SSD or 305 dollars for the 12 TB Western Digital Red mechanical drive, and that much cheaper mechanical drive with three times the storage will last you for years and years. I'm still using the 3 TB Seagate Barracuda I bought like eight years ago, and I've done so many writes to it. I use it all the time.
Plus isn’t it SSD’s that are more prone to degradation over time from rewriting/moving data?
 

hanselthecaretaker

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They're not nearly as bad about it as they used to be, but they're still more limited in that aspect compared to "rust platters". Also, most games aren't going to be doing much writing/deleting data once they're installed.
I mostly wonder about how often people will be playing musical installs when considering increasing file sizes and still limited space on the standard size drives both consoles will have.