Dead Space 3 Review

V3rtig0

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jovack22 said:
V3rtig0 said:
About Isaac's proficiency with guns - at first I thought the same thing many people are saying - "after so many encounters with necromorphs he better know how to use a gun", or something along the line. But when you think, if he only used tools all the time, how could he have learned to use guns? So he either got some training before going to find this marker doomsday machine(don't know much about the story and premise of the third game yet) or he just practiced with the pulse rifle that was available to him the first two games and we can just assume that other firearms operate in a similar manner.
It doesn't take a genius to operate a weapon, especially at close quarters like is often the case.
No, it doesn't take a genius to OPERATE a weapon, but it does take some practice to operate it at the proficiency Isaac does. I've only fired a real gun once, and I'm pretty sure I would be able to operate handguns, but I don't think I'd be able to reload weapons as fast and seemingly easily as he does. As I said, we can assume he had some weapons training (wasn't it mentioned in one of the text diaries that Isaac was in the military briefly?). I hope my point is clear, but arguing about video game logic is quite pointless.
 

Susan Arendt

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Guy Jackson said:
The Dead Space games have been widely lauded for their immersive HUD design, which has changed little in three games. Instead of information being displayed in a regular HUD, Isaac Clarke can open a 3D HUD that exists within the game world, not outside of it. This was a much-talked about feature before and after the release of the original Dead Space. It was one more step forward on the road to Immersion. Well done Visceral. Let's all have a beer.

So it seems strange to me, Susan, that you would hand-wave the inclusion of "unobtrusive" micro-transactions within that HUD. Very strange indeed.
But it's not in the HUD, it's when you're using a bench. Also, you can't see the microtransactions from the regular bench options, you have to hit Y to enter a completely separate menu.

I consider that to be very unobtrusive.
 

Kopikatsu

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Susan Arendt said:
So...how'd you feel about the post-Convergence Necromorph and the revelation that the Necromorphs are the Reapers?

Leave behind 'technology' that causes a species to evolve/develop in a certain way, then offer a solution to their problems (FTL travel in ME, limited resources in DS), but what they left behind also allows them to return and gather the species they built up in order to create more of themselves?

Edit: Also, about how they handled the co-op missions. The first one I did was the second, the 'elevator' one from Isaac's perspective. Then I went back and did it from Carver's perspective. That was...interesting.
 

jovack22

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V3rtig0 said:
jovack22 said:
V3rtig0 said:
About Isaac's proficiency with guns - at first I thought the same thing many people are saying - "after so many encounters with necromorphs he better know how to use a gun", or something along the line. But when you think, if he only used tools all the time, how could he have learned to use guns? So he either got some training before going to find this marker doomsday machine(don't know much about the story and premise of the third game yet) or he just practiced with the pulse rifle that was available to him the first two games and we can just assume that other firearms operate in a similar manner.
It doesn't take a genius to operate a weapon, especially at close quarters like is often the case.
No, it doesn't take a genius to OPERATE a weapon, but it does take some practice to operate it at the proficiency Isaac does. I've only fired a real gun once, and I'm pretty sure I would be able to operate handguns, but I don't think I'd be able to reload weapons as fast and seemingly easily as he does. As I said, we can assume he had some weapons training (wasn't it mentioned in one of the text diaries that Isaac was in the military briefly?). I hope my point is clear, but arguing about video game logic is quite pointless.
Agreed, wasn't trying to incite any sort of pointless online argument :p

In my mind, if I were being left hopeless in his situation, I'd spend 5 minutes practising quick reloads before going out into the unitologist hq... so Isaac (being an engineer.. which are usually smart people) would be able to be proficient especially by the second game.

For myself I have no weapons training or use of weapons in my life, but recreationally when I have used one I never really had too many issues hitting my targets/reloading/handling.

Like you said, we're discussing a game where reality is more not really ranked too highly on the list.
 

Epic Fail 1977

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Susan Arendt said:
Guy Jackson said:
The Dead Space games have been widely lauded for their immersive HUD design, which has changed little in three games. Instead of information being displayed in a regular HUD, Isaac Clarke can open a 3D HUD that exists within the game world, not outside of it. This was a much-talked about feature before and after the release of the original Dead Space. It was one more step forward on the road to Immersion. Well done Visceral. Let's all have a beer.

So it seems strange to me, Susan, that you would hand-wave the inclusion of "unobtrusive" micro-transactions within that HUD. Very strange indeed.
But it's not in the HUD, it's when you're using a bench. Also, you can't see the microtransactions from the regular bench options, you have to hit Y to enter a completely separate menu.

I consider that to be very unobtrusive.
Your saying that the bench is not part of the HUD (a debatable and pedantic claim IMO) and therefore doesn't need to be immersive?

As for the part about it being unobtrusive, I'll just quote the Destructoid review:

"Being given a constant DLC option every time you open a crafting bench, and being reminded to do so whenever you try to build something you can't afford, undermines the previously flawless atmosphere of the series, letting real life bleed into a game that's always been about building as believable a world as possible."
 

Susan Arendt

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Jan 9, 2007
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Guy Jackson said:
Susan Arendt said:
Guy Jackson said:
The Dead Space games have been widely lauded for their immersive HUD design, which has changed little in three games. Instead of information being displayed in a regular HUD, Isaac Clarke can open a 3D HUD that exists within the game world, not outside of it. This was a much-talked about feature before and after the release of the original Dead Space. It was one more step forward on the road to Immersion. Well done Visceral. Let's all have a beer.

So it seems strange to me, Susan, that you would hand-wave the inclusion of "unobtrusive" micro-transactions within that HUD. Very strange indeed.
But it's not in the HUD, it's when you're using a bench. Also, you can't see the microtransactions from the regular bench options, you have to hit Y to enter a completely separate menu.

I consider that to be very unobtrusive.
Your saying that the bench is not part of the HUD (a debatable and pedantic claim IMO) and therefore doesn't need to be immersive?

As for the part about it being unobtrusive, I'll just quote the Destructoid review:

"Being given a constant DLC option every time you open a crafting bench, and being reminded to do so whenever you try to build something you can't afford, undermines the previously flawless atmosphere of the series, letting real life bleed into a game that's always been about building as believable a world as possible."
I'm saying I didn't found it broke my immersion and that I didn't find it obtrusive. You're welcome to disagree, naturally. But Destructoid having one opinion doesn't negate my own.
 

Epic Fail 1977

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Perhaps I didn't make myself clear.

In previous games the bench was operated using the same in-game 3D holographic interface as the HUD, the store, and everything else. And for exactly the same reason: immersion. It was actually possible to be attacked while operating a bench. So I really don't see how your bench/HUD distinction is relevant.

The Destructoid review mentions (in the bolded part) something that doesn't sound to me like the user "pressing Y for DLC".
 

Treaos Serrare

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S.C.A.F Heavy Frame, Marauder Repeater Tip on Military engine with supplementary Mark-V Conical shotgun with all 8 chips filled with + to damage as well as Mark-V Damage Support and Mark-V Acid Bath best gun you can make and after getting access to the +3 chips you are a god of death

My Secondary was Basically the above except the Marauder was my under slung an the primary fire was a missile launcher
the Two Add-On's I had were Explosion+ and Safety Guard.

I hated those goddamn Feeder Necros so creepy and swarm you like holy hell
 

SnakeoilSage

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I feel this is a pretty good Aliens to the original Dead Space's Alien, with George Romero's Dawn of the Dead thrown into the middle with DS2. Nervous panic inevitably has to replace dread and tension because the necromorphs aren't shy about swarming you anymore, and like DS1, the horror aspect comes more from seeing what has become of the people who lived in the now blood-stained and abandoned corridors you traverse. This is nothing new, it's a technique common to video games stretching back to Resident Evil and System Shock, but Dead Space 3 does it really well. Dead Space 1 is my favorite video game, but DS3 has to be my favorite of the series so far.
 

immortalfrieza

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Asuka Soryu said:
Blood Brain Barrier said:
Not scary? What's become of the world? Horrible otherworldly beasts flying at you trying to kill you, and it's not scary. Huh.

Maybe what really needs to be said is that most (>90%) of our games are scary games involving killing, monsters and zombies and that we've become desensitized to it all.
I don't think it's that.

Fear needs build, it needs atmosphere and it needs to be handled right.

A monster in real life like this would frighten a lot of people, no matter the surrounding. Except, the problem is these are games, and are brains can tell fiction from reality, so when we have no build up, our mind easily spots these as fake and doesn't give in to being scared as it would've if it was seeing them in the right mood, the atmosphere, your mind itself being taken in and playing tricks on you.

It's why the monsters from that one really popular survival horror game look funny when seen out of context, but when you first seem them in the game with the build up, it can scare the hell out of you.
Exactly, it's not so much what's trying to scare the player but how well that scaring is done. In the third person FPS like the Dead Space games the player should be not only cautious, but downright paranoid about being attacked at any given moment, and finding out they are right a good percentage of the time, but most importantly said scaring tactics can't be repeated much, if at all. When I first played DS1 the BLAH! attacks by necros were so formulatic that I was predicting them with a pretty high degree of accuracy about a couple hours in, and they weren't much better in DS2 or 3 either. By DS3 I was predicting necromorph attacks almost to a T, and the combat tactics have hardly changed at all from game to game (stay away from the vents, shoot for the limbs, etc). Though the horror is there in DS3, it's the same old tricks that the previous games in the series have always used, there's very little that's actually new. By DS3 I was in it for the character interactions, logs, and storyline much more than for the horror aspects or the combat. I was pretty disappointed that Issac's insanity was pretty much gone in DS3, the hallucinations were pretty much the only unpredicable and consistently scary thing in DS1&2.