"Designer" names

The Bum

New member
Mar 14, 2010
856
0
0
Gudrests said:
Im on the fence about my name here...do you mean John...i hope not..we just name every first boy in the blood line that
No John is a regular name. It is not mispelled, nor is it pretntious. Has there every been a genral named say, Zach pershing?
 

BlueberryMUNCH

New member
Apr 15, 2010
1,892
0
0
I don't really care if I'm being honest. I'm a huge fan of uncommon names, but common names spelt funky? Meh, that's a bit poncy but as long as their nice people, right?
 

The Bum

New member
Mar 14, 2010
856
0
0
SeanTheSheep said:
Swollen Goat said:
Sleekgiant said:
Well the only time I have problems with it are the more ethnic names around Birmingham. Jarkeldruce is an actual name here.
I'm not really a fan of 'odd' names either, but at least it's actually unique. I guess I'm only irritated when people change the spelling of common names to be 'special'. Actually, to those of you with that type of name: Do you like having a 'unique' spelling or does it annoy you having to spell it EVERY SINGLE TIME you have to give your name? I mean hell, my last name is hardly weird but whenever I order say, pizza delivery, I just give my name as Smith so I don't have to bother with spelling.
See, I have a similar issue.
If someone calls me up, and asks for a "Mr. Rea" accroding to their piece of paper, they pronounce it "Ray" now I know the River Rea (Which I live near-ish to) is pronounced like that, but how the hell does Shashti from New Delhi know that?
And it gets worse when I try to explain that it's pronounced like "tea" or "pea" or "sea" they look at me like I'm insane to have an Irish name that follows logical gramattical conduct.

Sean isn't mangled as badly, but it's still a regular occurence that I spell my name for people, because nine times out of ten, it gets written as "Shaun", and the other time, I get asked "Irish or English spelling?" followeed by a dirty look when I say Irish.

OT: Designer names do annoy me, but Zach is actually the correct abbreviation of Zachariah, an old Hebrew name, I think.
Ah but it's commonly pronouced Zack thats what bugs me.
 

JimJamJahar

New member
Dec 18, 2009
237
0
0
I hate to break it to you, but if anything, Zack is the incorrect spelling. Zach is short for Zachary, Zack came about later because people couldn't handle the incredibly complex and crazy spelling of Zach.

OT: These wierd names do make me laugh. Like most of the guests on Jerry Springer that are called 'Shantarisaretta' or other such crazy names.
 

badgersprite

[--SYSTEM ERROR--]
Sep 22, 2009
3,820
0
0
The Bum said:
Dudemeister said:
How is Zach a designer name?
It's short for Zachary isn't it?
Then why is it pronouced the same as zack?
Why is the Czech Republic pronounced like Check? My name is Christina, and it's not pronounced like Chuh-ristina, is it? I think you picked a bad example, since Zach is actually a correct and traditional spelling of a common, biblical name.

Now, onto egregious failures of naming. I'm glad you brought this up. It bugs me so much. I used to think it was just a thing that American celebrities did, but, no, it's spread to all corners of the globe, and to all variations of trailer trash and bogans.

Kristal instead of Crystal? Crystin instead of Kristen (which is already kind of a designer name in itself)? Aleesha instead of Alicia? Aden instead of Aidan (a real Irish name)? All these deliberate misspellings of names annoy me, or attempts to make your child's name 'unique' when it just marks them as a privileged WASP. There's basically an entire list of so-called "Modern Names" on Behind The Name [http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/eng-m.php] and I advise checking it out if you want to see some of these 'variations'.

Should we even get started on ghetto names? Okay, friends, there are traditional African and Arabic names which are perfectly justified and quite lovely, but then there are ones that you're just making up. Latreesha? Destinee? LaShawnte? The sad thing here is that these kids are unfairly marked by these names. It unduly prejudices people against them, and causes people to make inaccurate assumptions about their worth and intelligence. The fact that there was a Secretary of State called Condoleezza doesn't mean that discrimination isn't prevalent in the work place.

Statistics have shown that people with stereotypically ethnic names (I don't remember if it was specifically African-American names, or names associated with a wide variety of minorities) have their resumes passed over for those with stereotypically Anglo-Saxon names, regardless of how qualified they are. I have to ask why people would name their child something that they know is going to have a detrimental effect on their ability to find work and achieve in the future.

Put it this way; there's a reason nearly all of my Asian friends have alternate English names or nicknames they go by in Australia, and a Chinese, Japanese, or Korean name that's their real name at home. They know people are more likely to hire someone whose name they can pronounce, so they take on two names to help them fit into both worlds. I personally think that's really clever.

I also feel sorry for anyone named after a car. I actually know a girl named Portia Carrera.
 

Gudrests

New member
Mar 29, 2010
1,204
0
0
The Bum said:
Gudrests said:
Im on the fence about my name here...do you mean John...i hope not..we just name every first boy in the blood line that
No John is a regular name. It is not mispelled, nor is it pretntious. Has there every been a genral named say, Zach pershing?
you have a point...and i agree..only guy i know named zach is ...useless lol
 

Magnalian

New member
Dec 10, 2009
969
0
0
I do not care for them. We have a guy at school 'technically' called Charles, but everyone pronounces it 'Charrel'. Though to be fair, the language factors in a bit.
EDIT: then again, can you consider that 'artsy'?
 

SeanTheSheep

New member
Jun 23, 2009
10,508
0
0
The Bum said:
SeanTheSheep said:
Swollen Goat said:
Sleekgiant said:
Well the only time I have problems with it are the more ethnic names around Birmingham. Jarkeldruce is an actual name here.
=snip=
OT: Designer names do annoy me, but Zach is actually the correct abbreviation of Zachariah, an old Hebrew name, I think.
Ah but it's commonly pronouced Zack thats what bugs me.
Does the word "character" also bug you then? What about "Christianity"?
The hard ch sound is a fairly standard thing, just not particularly common.
 

TehCookie

New member
Sep 16, 2008
3,919
0
0
I don't mind names that use foreign spellings, I hate names from people who can't spell. Who names their kid La-a (pronounced "La dash a" you say the dash, I always read it La ah) As for unique names it depends on the name. A kid named Storm sounds awesome but a kid called Sugamin (with the first part sounding the like sugar with no r) doesn't. Also those are all actual names from people I know.
 

Xanadu84

New member
Apr 9, 2008
2,946
0
0
Its worth noting that some times, a designer name is just a cultural difference. Names get adopted, changed to fit the culture, re-integrated, etc. That's why Jon and John exist, Zach and Zack, Megan, Meghan and Meaghan, and so on.
 

MagicMouse

New member
Dec 31, 2009
815
0
0
Whenever I meet a person named "Shawn" and they spell it "Sean" I always try to make them annoyed by pronouncing it "Seen".

That'll teach 'em.
 

badgersprite

[--SYSTEM ERROR--]
Sep 22, 2009
3,820
0
0
Danman1 said:
Swollen Goat said:
Here's the most retarded one I've seen to date: Ciial

That's pronounced 'Kyle'.
Oh. Oh god. No. Just... Really? Ciial. Did the hospital say "Kyle" was already taken for that server?
That poor kid is in for a life of being mocked with the nickname "Cialis".

I know I've already commented, but this is so bad that I still have to ask the question. Why? Why do people do this to their children? Really? Why do they give them names that read like diseases or medical treatments? I know I'm going to see girls named Activia soon. Christ, it almost makes people being given names from WoW or in Klingon or Elvish or something look acceptable in comparison.

(Note: No, nobody has my permission to give their child a name in Elvish, Klingon or based on a fantasy character. But, then again, anyone who wants to name their child Azaroth or something probably isn't especially likely to produce that many children...)

MagicMouse said:
Whenever I meet a person named "Shawn" and they spell it "Sean" I always try to make them annoyed by pronouncing it "Seen".

That'll teach 'em.
But Sean is the correct Irish spelling...

Seriously, dude, Shawn is the bastardisation, and I hate seeing it spelled that way. oO
 

SeanTheSheep

New member
Jun 23, 2009
10,508
0
0
MagicMouse said:
Whenever I meet a person named "Shawn" and they spell it "Sean" I always try to make them annoyed by pronouncing it "Seen".

That'll teach 'em.
Listen.

I hate you.
 

thethingthatlurks

New member
Feb 16, 2010
2,102
0
0
Attending a university with a substantial number of foreigners as left me exposed to quite a few interesting names, but it's always the horrendous misspelled anglo names that get to me:
Eg, Sindy, Cindy, Cindi, or Sindi? Apparently the middle two are acceptable as per Firefox's spellchecker. People are idiots anyway, so I can't really fault them for cursing their stupidity. That being said, should I ever have any offspring (godforbid), I'd name them after scientific terminology: inductivelycoupledplasma, h-bar, ruthenium, cardinality, tunnelingelectronmicroscopy, or theobromide. Yeah...those will be some unique children alright...
 

MagicMouse

New member
Dec 31, 2009
815
0
0
SeanTheSheep said:
MagicMouse said:
Whenever I meet a person named "Shawn" and they spell it "Sean" I always try to make them annoyed by pronouncing it "Seen".

That'll teach 'em.
Listen.

I hate you.
W/e "Seen", at least my name is spelled right!
 

Fetzenfisch

New member
Sep 11, 2009
2,460
0
0
A lot of those "weird written designer names" or just nothing as the foreign varieties of names that are ALSO used in english speaking cultures. So they are not really "wrong" per se

plus
Swollen Goat said:
It's funny, I learned the Smith trick from a friend of mine whose last name is Wojciechowski (pronounced whoa-juh-HOW-ski). That would suck.
Given that your try of phonetical transcription is right, this is already an adaptation. Just assuming that its eastern - european the most probable transcription would be Wɔɪkɪçɔvskɪ or Wɔɪkɪxɔvskɪ or Wɔɪtʃɪçɔvskɪ though the most here wont know the international phonetic alphabet, it should be something like woytshikofskee or woytshi[ch]owski ( the [ch] being the phonetic sound of [x] like in Loch Ness)

But BTT: The growing (over-)usage of stupid madeup names is a topic not only when it comes to US-celebrities, but even here in good ol'germany.
Well again at first when it comes to the ridiculous so called (wannabe)celebs and their offsprings [creatures called windston-gonzales or jeremy-blue or cosma-shiva] and secondly to the lowclass monkeys who have to do everything the boulevard tells them to. So there are more than a few satirical parodies of those families and their Jeremy-Pascals and Shakira-Melodys or Cheroquee-Joens.

Actual Informations say that this trent has luckily come to an end, for now.


MagicMouse said:
SeanTheSheep said:
MagicMouse said:
Whenever I meet a person named "Shawn" and they spell it "Sean" I always try to make them annoyed by pronouncing it "Seen".

That'll teach 'em.
Listen.

I hate you.
W/e "Seen", at least my name is spelled right!
Another good example for my post.
Sean is the "original" Irish spelling. well Séan or Seán are.

its really funny to try to annoy someone because his/her name isnt written like it is pronounced in english. Hardly a word in that language is.
take it you already know
Of tough and bough and cough and dough.
Others may stumble, but not you,
On hiccough, thorough, slough and through.
Well done! And now you wish, perhaps,
To learn of less familiar traps?

Beware of heard, a dreadful word,
That looks like beard and sounds like bird.
And dead--it's said like bed, not bead;
For goodness sake, don't call it deed!
Watch out for meat and great and threat.
(They rhyme with suite and straight and debt.)
A moth is not a moth in mother;
Nor both in bother, broth in brother.

And here is not a match for there,
Nor dear and fear for bear and pear;
And then there's dose and rose and lose--
Just look them up--and goose and choose;
And cork and work and card and ward,
And font and front and word and sword.
And do and go, then thwart and cart.
Come, come, I've hardly made a start.

A dreadful language? Why man alive,
I learned to talk it when I was five;
 

Xero Scythe

New member
Aug 7, 2009
3,463
0
0
The Bum said:
I've never understood why it's "Cool" or "Smart" to spell your childs name wrong. I mean take "Zach" for instance, I don't know about you, but that just bugs the hell out of me. (If your name is zach or you have a designer name, no offense intended.) It bothers me even more that eveyone pronounces it like Zack, a proper name. Also everyone i know who has a designer name is a total douchebag, but that may be just my bad choice of acuintences. So, what do you think of designer names? Lov'em? Hate'em? Don't give a shit but want to talk anyway?
Zach is more correct, seeing as the long form is Zachary. Never heard of designer names before, but Krystal is one I've seen before. Just never knew they had a name. Anyways, no, I don't think it matters. It's not like you can change it.

Still, my name translates to 'Conquest' in english, so no complaints here. :)
 

Red Right Hand

Squatter
Feb 23, 2009
1,093
0
0
MagicMouse said:
For goodness sake, don't call it deed!
Depends on your dialect for that one I suppose. Glaswegians say "deed".

MagicMouse said:
SeanTheSheep said:
MagicMouse said:
Whenever I meet a person named "Shawn" and they spell it "Sean" I always try to make them annoyed by pronouncing it "Seen".

That'll teach 'em.
Listen.

I hate you.
W/e "Seen", at least my name is spelled right!
You know that "Sean" is the classic Irish spelling, right? Your way of spelling it came after.

OT: The only thing about names is when people spell my name with a "w". Damn you Ewan McGregor!

EDIT:
Anarchemitis said:
Zach or Zack is fine.
Hunter however, is not a name, let alone one appropriate for a young girl.
This man would like to have a word with you, Hunter S. Thompson