How do you feel about autistic people?

Sung-Hwan

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I pose this interesting question through extensive observation of American society. Anyone who is not sensitive will not immediately shed tears over the title itself, but think carefully on the points I make and respond calmly.

Autistic kids are placed in very distinct rooms from their "normal" peers like animals, often in the care of unusually aggressive thugs in place of teachers instead. Oh yes, they aren't afraid to use force to get their way and often neglect their duties. People justify this due to the poor pay, but that is pretty funny I will admit. This distinct, animal-like treatment often leads to other peers antagonizing these autistic kids because kids are kids, and they can only assume they're "freaks." While I am exposing the cruel practices of America, it's not all there is to blame since autistic people are very erratic from what can be considered normal; some may pass off as normal with a few serious flaws, others may be completely disabled altogether.

On top of all this, "autism" is widely accepted as a derogatory term on the internet; as some form of calling someone stupid, it is fairly common. Infamously and unfortunately, the autistic manchild known as Christian Weston Chandler is the most documented person in the entire world on autism, and people use this as a way of generalizing. I hope no one sees me as antagonizing autistic people through this thread, but am just confused at, given the circumstances I described, how do we see them as human? Do we at all? I actually didn't even get to the worst parts of abuse, but my point stands.
 

Barbas

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Oct 28, 2013
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I do sometimes get annoyed when people casually use "retard", "autistic" and "aspie" as insults. Abuse is a method of dehumanizing people, so I suppose that to an unfortunately sizeable number of people, the answer to your question would be yes.

I think your title needs work, though, because there's probably only one way people can answer it without incurring...quite a bit, I imagine, none of it good.
 

Sung-Hwan

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Barbas said:
I do sometimes get annoyed when people casually use "retard", "autistic" and "aspie" as insults. Abuse is a method of dehumanizing people, so I suppose that to an unfortunately sizeable number of people, the answer to your question would be yes.

I think your title needs work, though, because there's probably only one way people can answer it without incurring...quite a bit, I imagine, none of it good.
Maybe the title was a bit too rash, but it's not the point I am making.

Indeed it is unfortunate, though it's so well integrated into society now you can't really help it. In a slightly less common way, terms involving homosexuality are also used as insults by less savory people.
 

Barbas

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Sung-Hwan said:
It's very interesting to me, to be honest, because I understand it so little. I sometimes find myself wondering how I'd be doing something I find fairly routine if I was fairly high up on the autism spectrum - if that's the correct way of phrasing it now (I know several learning disabilities at least have been re-categorized).
 

Queen Michael

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Sung-Hwan said:
On top of all this, "autism" is widely accepted as a derogatory term on the internet; as some form of calling someone stupid, it is fairly common.
Except for on Tumblr, where self-diagnosed autism is a badge of honor.
 

Dizchu

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Sep 23, 2014
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One of my best friends is autistic and he and I constantly joke about it. He says it's like he has "Up's Syndrome" (interpret that as you wish). He also strongly believes that I am on the autistic spectrum because I exhibit many of the "autistic" traits he has but to a more severe degree. However I have never had much luck with doctors and they always seem to want to throw me out the door with some anti-depressant pills instead of dealing with my problems. Am I autistic? I really don't know. But there's enough of a possibility for it to be a legit consideration.

But yeah, autistic people are just like the rest of humanity. Sure, there are certain personality traits linked to autism (look at Chris-chan and Elliot Rodger for extreme examples) and they are the basis of insults directed at the autistic, but I think poking fun at stereotypical autistic attitudes with the full knowledge that not all autistic people are like that is fine. Though I wouldn't recommend doing it in public forums because it may fuel misconceptions about autistic people.
 

Armadox

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Sung-Hwan said:
Barbas said:
I do sometimes get annoyed when people casually use "retard", "autistic" and "aspie" as insults. Abuse is a method of dehumanizing people, so I suppose that to an unfortunately sizeable number of people, the answer to your question would be yes.

I think your title needs work, though, because there's probably only one way people can answer it without incurring...quite a bit, I imagine, none of it good.
Maybe the title was a bit too rash, but it's not the point I am making.

Indeed it is unfortunate, though it's so well integrated into society now you can't really help it. In a slightly less common way, terms involving homosexuality are also used as insults by less savory people.
I'm curious where you're going with this. I mean, I've noticed the patterns on your posts, but I want to know what your end goal is. Is it that you think we're all horrible, secretly housing the same malnourished, malevolent ideologies? I have come to realize that the question isn't "how would you fix the problem?" but "how dark is your opinion of something?"

I'm curious as to your own opinion, Sung-Hwan. I want to know what makes you tick, and how you feel about the world. Why is it that you gravitate to the negative aspects of humanity? Does a good deed equal out a bad one, or is there so many bad deeds that a good deed is simply a mistake. A blip that comes and goes? Do you think people can change?

As for the question, mental illness, mental handicaps, and other forms of issues that create challenges in people's lives isn't something to pity or scorn. Simply try to help and improve their lives. Find some way to better their existence and pass on your good luck. That's really what it's all about, passing on a softer punch to the next guy then you got.

Emily Dickinson (1830?86). Complete Poems. 1924.

Part One: Life

VI

IF I can stop one heart from breaking,
I shall not live in vain;
If I can ease one life the aching,
Or cool one pain,
Or help one fainting robin
Unto his nest again,
I shall not live in vain.
 

Sung-Hwan

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"I'm curious as to your own opinion, Sung-Hwan. I want to know what makes you tick, and how you feel about the world. Why is it that you gravitate to the negative aspects of humanity?"

Nothing truly makes me tick; assuming that means infuriate. While harmless, I am partially a sociopath in that I feel no emotion for anything at all; am known to be, and somewhat believe I am quite intelligent, yet unfathomably unbelieving of myself; and I view the world in nothing but a hateful and negative way. I do not even value my own life, and would not flinch if someone attempted to murder me for no reason, simply because I would accept that the world's evil would finally fall upon me that day with all its fury.

I think to better understand me is to understand how negatively I view myself and the world due to my own experiences. I trust no one, and some people know that. One notable example is when I antagonized a police officer by referring to him as "cop" and asking if he was going to kill me and sweep my corpse under the sea like they do with so many innocent lives...when he looked back at me confused. Nothing came out of it though (literally), but I wanted to test fate that day.

It's obvious due to the circumstances, I have no real friends, and a total of three online that regularly try to get me to see things positively; to no avail, however.
 

Vault101

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Sep 26, 2010
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hooo booooy

Ummm well of coarse there are varying degrees and the misconceptions about people on the spectrum/societys generally inhability to deal with "disabled" people you know...it makes for some unpleasant stuff, obviously I don't like those things being used as insults , especially to people who are vulnerable in many ways

but personally? I'm gonna be honest I have a very low tolerance for dealing with other people...


DizzyChuggernaut said:
(look at Chris-chan and Elliot Rodger for extreme examples).
Eliot Roger wasn't Autisitc was he? and I think its actually pretty problematic to link a lot of behaviours to Autism (not to mention an easy "explanation" in rogers case, when in really there were a lot of factors)

-just because youre introverted or socially awkward does not mean your autistic
-just because you have 150+ collection of Anime figures does not make you autistic

ect
 

Armadox

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Sung-Hwan said:
"I'm curious as to your own opinion, Sung-Hwan. I want to know what makes you tick, and how you feel about the world. Why is it that you gravitate to the negative aspects of humanity?"

Nothing truly makes me tick; assuming that means infuriate. While harmless, I am partially a sociopath in that I feel no emotion for anything at all; am known to be, and somewhat believe I am quite intelligent, yet unfathomably unbelieving of myself; and I view the world in nothing but a hateful and negative way. I do not even value my own life, and would not flinch if someone attempted to murder me for no reason, simply because I would accept that the world's evil would finally fall upon me that day with all its fury.

I think to better understand me is to understand how negatively I view myself and the world due to my own experiences. I trust no one, and some people know that. One notable example is when I antagonized a police officer by referring to him as "cop" and asking if he was going to kill me and sweep my corpse under the sea like they do with so many innocent lives...when he looked back at me confused. Nothing came out of it though (literally), but I wanted to test fate that day.

It's obvious due to the circumstances, I have no real friends, and a total of three online that regularly try to get me to see things positively; to no avail, however.
No, no.. Not infuriate, thought that distinction does explain a lot. What are you passionate about, Sung-Hwan? What drives you? Why do you get out of bed every morning? Is there a reason? Is there anything in your life you feel proud of? Anything you've done that others should be proud of? You seem to have respect for your own status and self image. Why is that?

You seem to lash out easily, but I don't think lashing out is what you truly desire in life. I don't think there is anything so broken as rage without reason. So, what is your reasoning? Where, in all the layers of your very being is there a point to your pain? Do you feel like, if you could change you would, or do you believe how you are now is how you are meant to be. Do you desire friends or a partner?

The more I figure out a bit of you, the more I realize that you desire to push away others before they have the chance to push you away. You need to feel excluded to manifest the responses you need. I'd like you to try something for me. Can you name ten things you like? Ten things you feel better yourself?

In return, I'll accept a question about myself if you desire to ask one.
 

SoreWristed

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I used to be a scout leader for 7-8 year olds, and i used to see too many autistic children being pulled from the group, because they weren't going to fit in anyway. The one or two that were not, and stayed in our care, grew exceptionally well.

Biggest problem is when institutions like schools mark out people as being 'special' and thus earning them the hate from everyone who isn't, while scout groups (at least in this country) endeavour to actively engage them and treat them as equals. Pulling them aside from the group, giving them personal time with the 'beloved' groupleader, gets children jealous. While i do agree that extremely severe cases truly require special care, i hate to see them being set outside of normal social circles. All that while small children have the unique trait that they can unquestioningly accept people despite their 'little problems'.

Best case i can report is seeing how much love it earned me from certain parents saying their child does not need to be removed from the group (after they posed the question), just proves to me that way too much institutions tell them it's needed. While they can grow and learn to use their differences in strengths to a great degree.

If my dad was a child now, he'd be immediately diagnosed with autism, and be locked up in the loony bin before we even understood why and how. But he wasn't because autism 'didn't exist' in the sixties so he grew into it and ended up with a family, a respected job and a small business on the side. All because he wasn't marked for death early on.

I'm overexaggerating ofcourse, but you get the point.
 

Dizchu

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Sep 23, 2014
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Vault101 said:
Eliot Roger wasn't Autisitc was he? and I think its actually pretty problematic to link a lot of behaviours to Autism (not to mention an easy "explanation" in rogers case, when in really there were a lot of factors)
I looked it up just to check and it appears autism was only brought by the family's attorney and that he was not officially diagnosed. My bad, thanks for making me double-check. Though even if he was autistic, my main point was that people like him represent a tiny minority of autistic people and while they may have similar traits, other more serious factors are what cause people to become like him (or Chris-chan).

-just because youre introverted or socially awkward does not mean your autistic
-just because you have 150+ collection of Anime figures does not make you autistic
I find it sad that this stereotype exists in abundance but not the more positive "autistic savant" stereotype. Plenty of the most brilliant minds have been those of autistic people.
 

Creator002

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How do I feel about the autistic? No different. According to my psychologist, I have autistic symptoms and that's probably why. I treat everyone I meet the same and I've met a lot of intellectually disabled and some people with Asperger's due to my dad's line of work.
For lack of a better way to put it, you can't treat them the same as a "normal" person, because their brain doesn't work the same, but that doesn't mean you don't have basic human respect and decency towards them.
People don't notice any of my "autistic traits",[footnote]Though, I'm starting to suspect it's something else due to other symptoms. Have to talk to my psychologist about it first. I'll expand if someone asks.[/footnote] since I've never really had trouble knowing what do to and say at a particular moment, but if I'm not thinking about how I'm conducting myself, I'll commit major social faux pas (that the plural?) that make people feel like I'm ignoring them or not interested (the latter is probably true 90% of the time).[footnote]Again, I'll expand if someone asks.[/footnote]

Kaulen Fuhs said:
I do admit to using autistic and retard as insults, though, and offer no apology for that. Granted, I do try to take note of present company when I'm using potentially offensive language.
Same for me, too.
 

CrazyGirl17

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As someone with Asperger's (diagnosed by a professional, thank you very much, and back before anyone knew what it was), I've been in contact with multiple other autistic people over the years. Many of them were nice, though a few... weren't. Frankly, I find people claiming to be autistic in order to justify their behavior irritating, as they give the rest of us a bad name.
 

the_retro_gamer

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In my line of work I see a whole spectrum of different people with autism. Some people are just fine with no serious problems but they have to try extra hard in some areas (ie like social areas) that we take for granted. Then you have people that have moderate autism and they usually have some sort of developmental delay of some kinds. Then you have people with severe autism and really affects their behaviors and defiantly have some sort of developmental delay of some kinds. Then again the autism spectrum has been made so huge that its really hard to gauge how severe one person has it.
 

Godzillarich(aka tf2godz)

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guy with Asperger here, LOVE ME!

no topic: I have grown up with autism but I can't say I was ever bully because of it. I've had alright live for myself. The only think that tick me off is when people confuse autism with being mentally ill.

SoreWristed said:
If my dad was a child now, he'd be immediately diagnosed with autism, and be locked up in the loony bin before we even understood why and how. But he wasn't because autism 'didn't exist' in the sixties so he grew into it and ended up with a family, a respected job and a small business on the side. All because he wasn't marked for death early on.

I'm overexaggerating ofcourse, but you get the point.
Funny thing about that, back in those days being autistic would land you in the loony bin. back then they thought people with autism were mentally ill. It lucky your father was Able to hide it.
 

Gordon_4_v1legacy

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Well, sure some of them have problems and can be disruptive, but then so can a normal person after a few beers. So I just take 'em as they come. Seems easier.
 

Sleepy Sol

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If I've ever interacted with someone who was autistic or had Asperger's, I definitely didn't know it.

Because of that, I'm not sure how or what I'd feel about them.