Science Breaks Another Distance Record For Quantum Teleportation

WouldYouKindly

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My brain hurts. I'm starting to understand how much older people feel. Here's this technology that I would either have to spend a decade learning about or simply grow up with it in order to understand it.

I'll try to keep up, but damn if it isn't hard to keep up.
 

MiskWisk

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WouldYouKindly said:
My brain hurts. I'm starting to understand how much older people feel. Here's this technology that I would either have to spend a decade learning about or simply grow up with it in order to understand it.

I'll try to keep up, but damn if it isn't hard to keep up.
Here's what I do. If something says quantum, read it as magic. It makes everything so much simpler.
 

FalloutJack

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Nov 20, 2008
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WouldYouKindly said:
My brain hurts. I'm starting to understand how much older people feel. Here's this technology that I would either have to spend a decade learning about or simply grow up with it in order to understand it.

I'll try to keep up, but damn if it isn't hard to keep up.
MiskWisk said:
WouldYouKindly said:
My brain hurts. I'm starting to understand how much older people feel. Here's this technology that I would either have to spend a decade learning about or simply grow up with it in order to understand it.

I'll try to keep up, but damn if it isn't hard to keep up.
Here's what I do. If something says quantum, read it as magic. It makes everything so much simpler.
Essentially, this is a process of moving a higher order of computation information from Point A to Point B, more complex information faster with no loss of data. Not a literal teleportation, but a transmission nonetheless. Essentially, with a breakthrough like this, "How high is up?" just got alot higher in terms of computer information transmission.
 

Samsont

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So it seems like using the word "teleportation" here is a massive misnomer, there is not teleportation involved whatsoever. It's just moving very quickly.
 

The Rogue Wolf

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So if you've "teleported" the evil twin of the input photon, does it have a tiny goatee?

[small]Seriously, though, I've got no idea what any of this means aside from 'we can transmit more information farther now'.[/small]
 

MHR

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Seems like the one of 2 states of arrival are used to individually represent the 1's and 0's of the information being transmitted.

It helps to understand that all they have to do is make the particles arrive in either the "1" state or the "0" state. It's just a messy way of getting it there that just happens to have a lot of benefits to efficiency and speed.

It also seems like this is something that's going to take forever to get working practically. XD
 

Something Amyss

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Rebel_Raven said:
That's neat, and all, but I'm waiting on the Quantum Leap.
Oh boy!

The Rogue Wolf said:
So if you've "teleported" the evil twin of the input photon, does it have a tiny goatee?
Unless observed, all subatomic particles have and don't have a goatee simultaneously.

[small]Seriously, though, I've got no idea what any of this means aside from 'we can transmit more information farther now'.[/small]
My understanding of it is that that's basically what it means. Or rather, "we can transmit more data at a faster rate with the furthest distance we have yet managed."
 

Zombie_Fish

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It's worth noting that a 75% error rate is ridiculously high and there are other methods to make quantum teleportation 100% successful as long as the entanglement can hold, which is the hard part of this experiment in practice.

To put it as simply as I can think of right now: The first measurement has four possible outcomes with equal probability. Based on the outcome measured, the sender sends two classical bits to the receiver. From these two bits, the receiver knows what the outcome is. Now they just apply an appropriate operation to their qubit to get the state that was being sent.

I'm guessing NIST here just wanted a proof of concept over this kind of distance before doing anything more advanced.