The Escapist Cookbook

SckizoBoy

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I'll never understand why people actually throw up or gag when they eat century eggs. I fucking love the things, ever since I was a child.
It's one of the things I grew up to like. I didn't like it as a kid (in fairness, past a certain age, my old man's congee ceased to be appealing), so when I started making my own (chicken liver congee is great, but finding chicken liver is a bit of a pain), and after moving, I make my own hundred year egg and minced pork congee. Easy, quick, and pretty damn tasty. The missus also introduced me to a shockingly simple oyster sauce, tofu and hundred year egg combo which is weirdly good.

It's one of those stereotypical things and when people are goaded into eating it it's by itself and with the main focus being the yolk, which has a really sulphurous odour which is where the hate is generally directed. Actually cook the stuff in something and it's not just palatable.
 

Bob_McMillan

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big ol snip
We do have a grill, its a hybrid with gas and charcoal. We used it quite a lot during the quarantine, for some easy meals like porkchops, sausages, and our local version of BBQ. Although we just entered the rainy season here, which also happens to be 50% of the year, so grilling stuff isn't very feasible anymore.

Don't have a roaster, crock pot, pressure cooker, etc. though. Our culture isn't very big on such appliances unfortunately. Guess its a third world country kind of thing.

Our family has been going to this congee place for years, and man I love it. Crispy chip things that are amazing even soggy, minced pork, century egg, and then an actual raw egg mixed in while the congee is cooling down in the fridge. Crispy garlic and spring onions for garnish. And optional soy sauce mixed with vinegar (I think).

But my first experience with century eggs was in Chinese restos where they serve these "cold cut" platters. Century egg is plated with this weird vegetable thing that I always assumed was seaweed. I'd just eat the century egg on its own though, I love the taste of the yolk. That some people spit it out the moment it enters their mouths leads me to believe that we cook our century eggs differently here haha
 

SckizoBoy

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Our family has been going to this congee place for years, and man I love it. Crispy chip things that are amazing even soggy, minced pork, century egg, and then an actual raw egg mixed in while the congee is cooling down in the fridge. Crispy garlic and spring onions for garnish. And optional soy sauce mixed with vinegar (I think).

But my first experience with century eggs was in Chinese restos where they serve these "cold cut" platters. Century egg is plated with this weird vegetable thing that I always assumed was seaweed. I'd just eat the century egg on its own though, I love the taste of the yolk. That some people spit it out the moment it enters their mouths leads me to believe that we cook our century eggs differently here haha
Remember going to a congee place in Hong Kong, not sure if it's there any more, but damn, they made some good stuff. Fish or chicken with ginger, minced pork, hundred year egg, all that good stuff. That's probably what I miss when I cook my own congee, the spring onion garnish, 'cos I don't actually use it for anything else so see little reason to get it(!) -_-

But yeah, might be how it's prepared not sure if one sort of ash is different from another, tho, I've never partaken in the preservation process of eggs, only seen how my Mom does salted egg. That... I'm not so keen on! ^^;
 

Chimpzy

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Eh, why not, I'll just do another classic Belgian dish:

Stoofvlees aka Flemish meat stew
  • 2 large onions
  • 1 kg beef brisket
  • 1-2 25 cl bottles of dark beer (any brown ale will do, but a real Trappist is best)
  • 2 fresh bay leaves
  • 2 stems of fresh thyme
  • 2 stems of fresh parsley
  • 1 clove
  • 2 tbs Sirop de Liège (or 50 gr of milk chocolate)
  • 1 big slice of brown bread
  • 2 tbs of sharp mustard (I prefer Dijon)
  • Natural vinegar
Start by cutting your brisket into cubes about 4-5 cm thick. Give them a good sear in some butter in skillet. Depending on the size of your skillet, do it in smaller batches, otherwise too much liquid might escape and the meat will start boiling in its own juices. Dice the onion, not too finely. Melt some butter in a large pot, then chuck in the diced onion and let simmer on medium heat until nicely glazy. Now add in the meat. Pour the beer in the now empty skilled and bring it to a boil (and also to deglace those tasty stickings). Once boiling, add the beer to the pot with meat and onions. Grab some kitchen string and make a bouquet garni out of the thyme, parsley and bay leaves. Add to the pot, along with the clove.

Also add in 2 tablespoons of Sirop de Liège (a regional jelly-like spread made from apple and pear juice) for color and some added sweetness. To prepare this dish the proper traditional way, real syrup has to be in there, preferably the brands Meurens, Charlier or Delvaux. Everything else is imitation. However, I reckon that most of you won't find this in your local supermarkets, but there are a few good alternatives: apple butter, Swiss birnenhonig or Jersey nièr beurre also work very well. If none of those are available, you can substitute the sirop with 50 grams of milk chocolate. It's the least option, but the most realistic for anyone living outside of Europe.

Now comes the weird part. Grab your big slice of bread and spread 2 tablespoons of mustard (I prefer Dijon) on one side. Put the slice on top of the meat, with the mustard side facing down. Now put the heat down to low and let the whole thing slow cook for at least 1,5 hours to 3 hours. Don't put the lid on the pot so the sauce can reduce. Once the sauce has the desired thickness and the meat is fully cooked and tender, add in a small dash of vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with french fries and simple vinaigrette salad.
 
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Chimpzy

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If you do make the Carne Asada, let me know how it turns out for you!
So I finally tried that Carne Asada recipe of yours. Had an excuse to bring out the barbie when my GF's dozen sisters well, actually two sisters, but the 3 of them talking sounds like 12. Must be the Italian blood came over a few weeks ago. Anyway, was some good eats. Compliments were given. Siblings won over. Huge success! I'd put a thumbs up emoji but the forum won't let me -sadface-
 

lil devils x

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So I finally tried that Carne Asada recipe of yours. Had an excuse to bring out the barbie when my GF's dozen sisters well, actually two sisters, but the 3 of them talking sounds like 12. Must be the Italian blood came over a few weeks ago. Anyway, was some good eats. Compliments were given. Siblings won over. Huge success! I'd put a thumbs up emoji but the forum won't let me -sadface-
Awesome! I am glad they liked it. Hopefully they didn't eat them all so you had some for left overs! We are making spicy chicken quesadillas tonight! Nom Nom!

Were you able to find the Mexican oregano or did you substitute?
 

Xprimentyl

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Were you able to find the Mexican oregano or did you substitute?
We've made our Mexican ceviche twice, and both times we used regular oregano instead of Mexican. We figured the two couldn't possible be THAT different, but seeing as I've now seen the term "Mexican oregano" for just the third time in my life, I had to look it up. Apparently it's pretty different; gonna have to add this one to spice cabinet before we make ceviche again.

1598730878331.png
 

lil devils x

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We've made our Mexican ceviche twice, and both times we used regular oregano instead of Mexican. We figured the two couldn't possible be THAT different, but seeing as I've now seen the term "Mexican oregano" for just the third time in my life, I had to look it up. Apparently it's pretty different; gonna have to add this one to spice cabinet before we make ceviche again.

View attachment 669
I certainly notice a difference, to me the taste difference is like eating two different recipes all together. but then again, I am a super taster so I tend to notice that stuff immediately.
.
 
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Kae

Just burn the whole thing.
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As someone that has only ever used Mexican oregano because I don't think any other kind is sold here, I was unaware there was a difference, obviously we just call it oregano.
 
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lil devils x

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As someone that has only ever used Mexican oregano because I don't think any other kind is sold here, I was unaware there was a difference, obviously we just call it oregano.
Mexican Oregano is the primary one we use in Texas as well, at least my family anyhow.. But we have to actually have to buy it labeled "Mexican oregano" in the store, usually the one we buy is in the Mexican food section and not on the spice aisle here. We actually grow both on my parents farm, but that is 20 min away and the store is 5 so in a crunch, the store is faster. XD
 

Chimpzy

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Awesome! I am glad they liked it. Hopefully they didn't eat them all so you had some for left overs! We are making spicy chicken quesadillas tonight! Nom Nom!

Were you able to find the Mexican oregano or did you substitute?
Yes, leftovers were had. Still delish the next day. Alas no, no Mexican oregano, but a bit of rosemary and verbena worked quite well. Probably not very authentic, but tasty. Gives it a little hint of Hungarian cuisine.
 
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lil devils x

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Yes, leftovers were had. Still delish the next day. Alas no, no Mexican oregano, but a bit of rosemary and verbena worked quite well. Probably not very authentic, but tasty. Gives it a little hint of Hungarian cuisine.
I might have to try it that way just to see what that tastes like. Going with the Verbena is probably better than regular oregano, so sounds like an interesting alternative.
 

Kae

Just burn the whole thing.
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Mexican Oregano is the primary one we use in Texas as well, at least my family anyhow.. But we have to actually have to buy it labeled "Mexican oregano" in the store, usually the one we buy is in the Mexican food section and not on the spice aisle here. We actually grow both on my parents farm, but that is 20 min away and the store is 5 so in a crunch, the store is faster. XD
I really wish I was a good cook, so I could contribute authentic Mexican recipes to this thread, unfortunately that isn't the case.
 

SupahEwok

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I really wish I was a good cook, so I could contribute authentic Mexican recipes to this thread, unfortunately that isn't the case.
You don't need to be a good cook, you're surrounded by taquerias, why would you cook?

If there's one thing I miss about living in Corpus Christi for school (and believe me, there isn't much to miss), it's the taqueria across the street from where I lived.
 
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lil devils x

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Supertaster... is there anything you aren't or can't do?
Being a super taster is a bad thing, not a good thing. I can't stand most seafood because it all tastes like the poo water the fish come out of so strongly I gag and my eyes water and can't even choke it down. HAHA

I am super picky on fish and most food because I taste the yucky stuff in it other's don't want to taste. I really wish I didn't. It has ruined so many foods for me.

And yes, there is plenty I am not and cannot do. I just am just very good at what I DO try to do. :D