The FOOD (& Drink) Thread

BrawlMan

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I went to Nikola's and got nachos last night. America really needs to redefine the term, appetizers. I'm not complaining, but the appetizer might as well be a medium to large dinner at this point with most of these places.

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Xprimentyl

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Made my mom's Dairy Rose Soup for the first time. It's a cream of mushroom/chicken-based soup with potatoes, onions, celery, and bacon. Everyone loved it. I usually crave it in the winter as it is the perfect comfort food on a chilly day, but even heading into the dead of summer in Texas, it's wonderful. @Kyrian007, it pairs greatly with a basic grilled cheese.
 

Bob_McMillan

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Made my mom's Dairy Rose Soup for the first time. It's a cream of mushroom/chicken-based soup with potatoes, onions, celery, and bacon. Everyone loved it. I usually crave it in the winter as it is the perfect comfort food on a chilly day, but even heading into the dead of summer in Texas, it's wonderful. @Kyrian007, it pairs greatly with a basic grilled cheese.
I was at a company retreat recently and in every single meal the soup was my favorite dish. Mainly because it was a buffet thing and the soup was the only thing that was consistently warm. I live in a hot ass country, so hot soup isn't something I usually appreciate.
 

Xprimentyl

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We bought some frozen salted pollack thinking it was "salted" in the way most salted foods tend to be, but no. This shit was COATED in salt. It was more salt than fish. We tried it on the grill; my gf took the first bite, and spit it out. I thought she was exaggerating, so took my own bite... then spit it out. It was literally inedible for how salty it was. I can't for the life of me think how this was meant to be consumed. We took what was left (basically ALL of it save our two bites) and dropped it into a stew, added a ton of veggies, most importantly potatoes, to try and dilute the salt. It's better, but still, each bite of the fish is notably salty.

So, anyone familiar with salted fish and how to use it? Because at this point, I'm ready to stick it on a post in the yard for salt lick, but we don't have any deer around here to appreciate it.
 

Thaluikhain

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In the old days, salting was how food was preserved, which is well known. What is not so well known is that you have to use loads of salt, to the extent that if you can eat it without soaking it in water for 4 hours (or preferably overnight), you've not got enough salt.

Some places still make salted foods the old way, though that's rare. Looks like you found one. Lots of soaking is required.

(As an aside, during the US War of Independence, the British cut off salt supplies to the rebels, the price went up 16 fold and Washington had to buy it on the black market. Now sure, you can get salt by boiling seawater (or at least you could before microplastics, might be an issue nowdays), but you need massive amounts of it, it's just not really practical)
 

Xprimentyl

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In the old days, salting was how food was preserved, which is well known. What is not so well known is that you have to use loads of salt, to the extent that if you can eat it without soaking it in water for 4 hours (or preferably overnight), you've not got enough salt.

Some places still make salted foods the old way, though that's rare. Looks like you found one. Lots of soaking is required.

(As an aside, during the US War of Independence, the British cut off salt supplies to the rebels, the price went up 16 fold and Washington had to buy it on the black market. Now sure, you can get salt by boiling seawater (or at least you could before microplastics, might be an issue nowdays), but you need massive amounts of it, it's just not really practical)
You're exactly right. A rudimentary Google search learned me that we were supposed to soak the pollack overnight whereas we only thawed it and threw it on a grill skillet. Lessons learned, but I think the predominant one is we don't need to mess with salted fish when fresh is readily available; "salted" is a whole other process.
 

Thaluikhain

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Yeah, I'm unsure why you'd want to have food that salted nowdays, unless you are doing some historical re-enactment thing.
 
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Xprimentyl

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Yeah, I'm unsure why you'd want to have food that salted nowdays, unless you are doing some historical re-enactment thing.
We didn't know what "salted" meant. We know now, and we're avoiding it like the plague... until there IS a plague, at which point we'll worry about perfecting our salted food culinary skills. But in our defense, it really should have been in an entirely separate, apocalypse-survivor section of the grocery store, not sitting next to normal filets like it wasn't conditioned for life on the fringes of a failing society.
 

Thaluikhain

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Well, when I said "you", I meant that in a general sense, I'm really unsure who the intended market is for that. I mean, I can understand people maybe wanting to salt food the old fashioned way themselves, but store bought doesn't seem to make sense.
 

Xprimentyl

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Apparently, salting water to make it boil more quickly actually makes it take LONGER to boil. My life has been a lie.
 
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Kyrian007

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We didn't know what "salted" meant. We know now, and we're avoiding it like the plague... until there IS a plague, at which point we'll worry about perfecting our salted food culinary skills. But in our defense, it really should have been in an entirely separate, apocalypse-survivor section of the grocery store, not sitting next to normal filets like it wasn't conditioned for life on the fringes of a failing society.
It does kind of just depend on how you use it. The Malaysian cafe a few miles north of my apartment complex has a chicken and salted fish fried rice... that is the most delicious fried rice I've ever had.
Apparently, salting water to make it boil more quickly actually makes it take LONGER to boil. My life has been a lie.
I was told that as well, and never really believed it. But I still do it. The best reason to salt the water... makes the pasta taste a little better and if you use the starchy water to thicken a sauce (I do it with carbonara) it adds flavor.

I have been a good boy diet wise for the last month, and it was so freaking hot yesterday... I decided to treat myself.
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This is a strawberry lemonade honey beignet funnel cake mochinut delight. Mochi makes a fantastic donut.
 

Xprimentyl

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It does kind of just depend on how you use it. The Malaysian cafe a few miles north of my apartment complex has a chicken and salted fish fried rice... that is the most delicious fried rice I've ever had.
Oh, I'm sure it has its uses, but I'm far from a culinary expert (I don't even consider myself a home chef given most, if not all, of my attempts at cooking involve simply following someone else's recipe.) If we buy salted fish again (which I'm 99.9% sure we won't,) we'll have a very specific recipe in mind, and we'll CERTAINLY soak it first.

I was told that as well, and never really believed it. But I still do it. The best reason to salt the water... makes the pasta taste a little better and if you use the starchy water to thicken a sauce (I do it with carbonara) it adds flavor.
Yeah, me too. I've been salting water to boil it since I was old enough to work a stove; you'd have to tell me it was poisonous before I'd even try to break the habit. They can take their science and shove it, as far as I'm concerned.

I have been a good boy diet wise for the last month, and it was so freaking hot yesterday... I decided to treat myself.
View attachment 9220
This is a strawberry lemonade honey beignet funnel cake mochinut delight. Mochi makes a fantastic donut.
My gf's sister (married to a Vietnamese man, and they've four children together) has embraced various Asian cultures damn-near to an obsession. I don't think I've ever seen her eat anything other than Asian foods, and she often travels from Moore, OK to Dallas, TX for her favorite Mochi donut shop. After she all but pried my mouth open and forced one down my mouth, I must agree, Mochi donuts are pretty great, and I'm not a big sweets person. Were I to show her this, she might drive up to Kansas for it. As a matter of fact, I think I will just to test my theory...
 

Kyrian007

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Oh, I'm sure it has its uses, but I'm far from a culinary expert (I don't even consider myself a home chef given most, if not all, of my attempts at cooking involve simply following someone else's recipe.) If we buy salted fish again (which I'm 99.9% sure we won't,) we'll have a very specific recipe in mind, and we'll CERTAINLY soak it first.



Yeah, me too. I've been salting water to boil it since I was old enough to work a stove; you'd have to tell me it was poisonous before I'd even try to break the habit. They can take their science and shove it, as far as I'm concerned.



My gf's sister (married to a Vietnamese man, and they've four children together) has embraced various Asian cultures damn-near to an obsession. I don't think I've ever seen her eat anything other than Asian foods, and she often travels from Moore, OK to Dallas, TX for her favorite Mochi donut shop. After she all but pried my mouth open and forced one down my mouth, I must agree, Mochi donuts are pretty great, and I'm not a big sweets person. Were I to show her this, she might drive up to Kansas for it. As a matter of fact, I think I will just to test my theory...
Wichita has one Mochinut location now, another opening up in a month or so. And soon another mochi donut type location opening up in town as well (I forget the name.) I was particularly pumped to try the Korean corn dogs. Then I tried them. ... ... ...

We can just go with; I can see why some people really like them. But they make for a better Instagram pic than they do a snack.
 
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SilentPony

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Xprimentyl

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Never ever order the Subway tuna. Multiple studies have come out that not only is it usually not tuna, its usually not even fish. Subway tuna is mostly just chicken and mayo.
Luckily for me, I don't like chicken, tuna, or egg salad shit, but for those that do, I can't fathom why they'd actually order that slop scooped out of a room-temperature tub with the milky water sitting atop with any faith they might not die from salmonella or E-coli. I mean, I don't have much faith in the rest of what's on order at fast food places like Subway, but at least I've the dignity not to be risk myself on literal goops of mayonnaise and meat particles.
 

Thaluikhain

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I've suddenly been reminded of The Invisible Man, a tv show from 2000-2002. In one episode there was a strange and terrible virus, and the only cure was getting terrible food poisoning, so they had to requisition the mayonnaise from a local fast food place.

I'm not making this up.
 

Xprimentyl

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As a kid, I never liked condiments like ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise, and pretty much associated other condiments like relish and sauerkraut with them assuming I didn't like them by association. Fast forward about 35 years since I took my stance on condiments, my gf convinced me to try sauerkraut when she basically said "it's just cabbage and vinegar, and you like both of those things." I honestly never knew what sauerkraut was; I just disliked it because it sat on the table next to the unholy trinity at many a cookout. And now I love sauerkraut.

Long story short: don't be afraid to try "new" things. (Except ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise; avoid those at all cost.)
 

Asita

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I have been a good boy diet wise for the last month, and it was so freaking hot yesterday... I decided to treat myself.

This is a strawberry lemonade honey beignet funnel cake mochinut delight. Mochi makes a fantastic donut.
Looks tasty. If you want a cold healthy treat and have a good blender, I've got a berry smoothie recipe I can toss your way that I've basically repurposed into a sherbet. Granted though, the way I make it does mean it needs to thaw out on the counter for about 2 hours before it hits the right consistency, so it could probably stand some optimization. Works for my diet purposes though.
 
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