The Reason You're (Not) A Console Gamer

Shamus Young

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The Reason You're (Not) A Console Gamer

Before you click, let me point out that we're not having THAT discussion again. We're actually having a discussion about why THAT discussion is so often a dead end.

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Dec 10, 2012
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Tis true, a good point well made. As a kid in the '90s I had both a pc and a console, but I ended up going with consoles because more of my friends played games on the Genesis than the computer. Most of the games I heard of and played with friends were Sega and Sony, so it was an easy choice to get those systems myself.

Fanboys will be fanboys, but it is a stupid argument all around, and misses the point of the issue anyway.
 

Covarr

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Growing up, I was mostly a console kid, but I had PC games too. I went back and forth between them pretty interchangably, playing Super Mario World on one system and Jazz Jackrabbit 2 on another. It didn't really make much of a difference to me either way, back then, and either one had experiences that couldn't be replicated on the other. It didn't really matter to me, as long as I could play games. It wasn't until about 2009 that I started to gravitate toward PC. I'd just gotten all my financial aid money for college, and I needed a new computer anyway because my old cheapo laptop was falling apart, so I decided to go all-in and get the best equipment I could for under $700.

It wasn't a beast, by any means, but it was pretty decent. 4GB RAM, a GeForce 9800 GT (I was lucky with my timing, got it on a really good sale), and a Core 2 Duo E7300. Enough to actually play all the free games I'd been playing before (Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory, mostly), but at framerates above 20 and graphics settings above minimum. I was ecstatic. But I needed more games, so I bought The Orange Box, having heard it was much better on PC than the PS3 version I already owned. When I saw the difference, when I discovered the free, regular updates... that's when I knew that PC would be my main platform. It was specifically VALV[sup]E[/sup] and TF2 that converted me, and they've had a good deal of loyalty from me ever since, even when they're being complete asshats.

Even though I'm primarily a PC gamer, I still do a fair bit of console gaming. Metal Gear has, until recently, been a primarily console experience, and that alone is enough to get me to buy a system. The barrage of semi-free games with PS Plus that I might not have otherwise bought keeps me coming back to my PS3 and PS4, and Nintendo's exclusives have yet to disappoint me. I don't see myself giving up console gaming anytime soon. Still, when a game is available on both PC and console, I'm probably gonna get the PC version[footnote]Unless it's Arkham Knight or Need for Speed: Rivals. Seriously, I have a standing policy against buying shoddy PC ports, and generally if this happens I will not buy the game at all on any system.[/footnote]. I do love my high framerates, my gaming mouse, and the convenience of having games at a computer I spend so much time at anyway. I'll never be an aggressive "master race" PC gamer, but I'll always be a PC gamer.

P.S. Thanks
 

schmulki

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I feel like it used to not even be a fight. There were a few PC games which everyone played and were well worth having a PC capable of running them (most of the Blizzard stuff during their heyday, CS, etc.), and other than that, it just wasn't worth the cost and trouble to play on a PC. It was extremely costly, games didn't work right, you had a ton of drivers and patches to deal with, etc.

And then consoles spent a decade squandering away all the advantages they had over a PC while things on the PC side of things became more stable in terms of hardware and drivers, Steam helped manage everything very well, etc.

So what do we have now? An article like this which is completely true: it's no longer a matter of, "it's obvjectively better to do X or Y," but a situation where it's really personal preference and more changed by the way you would like to game than anything else.

It's kinda sad, really. I hoped that by now, we would be much further along than we are. Take the completeness we used to have from console games, the modding scene from PC games, the ability to relatively easily be able to add new features/content to existing games instead of selling rehashed annual sequels of games which are barely changing. Instead, we have money-grubbing companies trying their damnedest to hold onto legacy models of doing business and trying to such every penny they have out of consumers to keep things going like they're used to with the least interruption possible.
 

erbkaiser

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I am a console AND PC gamer.

Typically, any game coming out on both I'll prefer to play on the PS4 for the following reasons:
1) Easier: I just slap the disk in and play
2) No incompatibility with drivers, controllers, DRM, phase of the moon... it just works
3) A controller is the superior interface for anything not requiring mouse precision.
4) My PC is getting on in age and I can't get a constant framerate in all cases... and I've upgraded it enough to make me have to buy completely new instead. And if faced with spending 2000 on a new PC or potentially buying 400-500 games, guess what I prefer.

HOWEVER, a lot of games simply will never work on a console so I play those on PC. Games like Crusader Kings 2, Civilization; Indie titles; retro classics; moddable games.

By owning a PC and a console I have the best of both worlds. The only things I "miss" out on are Nintendo exclusives, and Nintendo is getting increasingly more removed from what I consider relevant to my gaming tastes each generation, and whatever games Microsoft traps behinds wads of cash to keep it away from PS4 for a limited time.
Worth it.
 

Phrozenflame500

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So many console arguments are so foreign to me though. Like, I own a console (a Wii U, I don't know if a PS4 is much easier), but accessing that console requires me to get, walk over to the living room, bend down, find the disk I want to play, enter the disk, turn on the console, wait for it to boot up, input my password using the awkward controller interface, navigate and press that "game" icon, then wait for that to load.

Compared to PC where it's two clicks and waiting for it to load.

I guess that's mostly because my PC is always on and Steam is always open, but even if it wasn't the case my PC boots up much faster then my console (again maybe the PS4 is different) and inputting passwords and menu navigation is infinitely easier with KB+M. Plus digital > physical IMO and dealing with console networks like PSN and *shutters* Nintendo eShop retroactively make me like Steam much much more.

I do agree that if you're into exclusives or if your friends pick one or if your furniture situation is bad a console might be the better option though. And it isn't *really* as big a deal as the fanboys would like you to believe.
 

EeviStev

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Cheers for this, Shamus. A while ago I got into a Mouse and Keyboard vs. Gamepad "debate" and after a while I realised we were just talking past each other by stating our personal preferences over and over. If I were about seventeen thousand times more intelligent and insightful, this article is what I would have said to point out the futile nature of our discussion.

Go Team Gamepad.
 

Sniper Team 4

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I am an example of that last point. We had a computer growing up, my brother and I, and we had games on it. X-Wing, Lords of Magic, The Lord of the Rings, and a few others that I don't remember. However, getting approval from our dad--who worked with computers and therefore knew all the bad things that could happen to them if we clicked on the wrong thing or installed something wrong--and then getting him to actually install the games was a nightmare. He always had this disapproving scowl on his face, and whenever something did go wrong--failed to launch or who knows what else--he would never show us how to fix it, or walk us through it. He'd just say, "I'll handle it," and did it on his own.

All of this was very stressful for my brother and I, being eight and ten. So when we finally got a Super Nintendo, we were off. No more asking for help, no more worrying that we might break the computer, no more stress. The console was just easier, so we grew up with the consoles and that's why I'm a console gamer. What Shamus said about all that technical stuff being too much is completely true for me. To this day, twenty years later, I'm still terrible with computers and don't know what most of the jargon means because my dad told us such horror stories, and refused to let us learn about them growing up, that I just never picked up the skills. Many of my friends give me weird looks likes I'm crazy.
 

Luminous_Umbra

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I guess this is explains why I'm a bizarre mix of console, handheld, and PC gamer. My family has an old Dreamcast (which was the first console I played), my father has an old laptop which I first used for PC games, and I received a GBA when I was younger for my birthday. I've ended up splitting my games where convenient. (shooters on PC, etc.)
 

kasperbbs

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The main reason why i don't own a PS4 right now is the prices of games. I can preorder Fallout 4(PC) for 36 euros right now and the best thing that i could get for a console at this price is AssCreed 4 and if i added a few euros i could get rayman legends, minecraft and stuff like that. It's ridiculous. I got a wireless 360 controller and a long ass hdmi cable instead.
 

infohippie

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Interesting article. I had not thought of it in those terms before, but it makes a lot of sense. Though I always thought one of the main furniture considerations was whether you felt more comfortable sitting up at a desk or on a couch.

I began gaming a very long time ago, with a Z-80 based 8-bit computer that I would program myself in BASIC. Towards the end of the eighties I upgraded to an Amiga, then the next generation of Amiga. Once that was no long a viable platform I moved on to PCs in the early nineties and have remained a PC gamer ever since. I have never owned a console in my life so PC gaming is just what's natural to me. When I was younger a friend of mine had a Super Nintendo that we would play a few things on, and for a while I lived in a household that had a PS2 and I enjoyed quirky Japanese games like Ico, but a desktop computer of one kind or another has always been "what I game on".

schmulki said:
I feel like it used to not even be a fight. There were a few PC games which everyone played and were well worth having a PC capable of running them (most of the Blizzard stuff during their heyday, CS, etc.), and other than that, it just wasn't worth the cost and trouble to play on a PC. It was extremely costly, games didn't work right, you had a ton of drivers and patches to deal with, etc.
I find statements like this odd, because that has literally never been my experience. I've been PC gaming almost since PC gaming existed and even at its most complex in DOS days it was "Run the installer, run the audio config tool, play the game." On some rare occasions you might have needed to write a boot sequence (config.sys, autoexec.bat) designed to push everything possible into high memory to free up enough lower memory for a game. Since Windows 95 and the games that started being designed for that, even this had been greatly simplified.
It was a bit more expensive than console gaming for a while, when the early 3D cards came out, but the hardware price differential has been steadily dropping ever since and the games themselves have always been cheaper on a PC. "Extremely costly", however, not at all.
 

Dalisclock

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I'm kind of on both sides of this. I started out with a console and stuck with it through the SNES. Around that time, I really got into PC gaming and more or less stayed there(though discovering Emulation allowed me to play some of the console games I never got around to or never beat or weren't released in the US). Recently, I bought myself an older PS3 so I could play all of those PS games that I'd heard were awesome and figured they'd NEVER get a PC Port. Granted, it took a decade for the Playstation to have enough exclusives(ICO, SotC, GoW, Silent Hill) for me to justify the cost of getting one.

So while most of my gaming is still PC, for the last year or so I've been playing some of the PS games that I'd missed over the past decade.
 

Holythirteen

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And yet, we still are talking about the people who are going into forums and chats in order to justify their preferences. ;)

I suppose the argument of: "I can't make this work with my living situation" is boring, and somewhat invalidates what you find cool about your console.
 

Zakarath

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Heh. I know I'm a bit of an outlier, but I have my fancy expensive gaming PC hooked up to a pair of monitors resting on a card table, while I sit in a folding chair.
 

Rad Party God

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Pretty good article, especially towards the end.

The first point of "Who you live with" kinda rings true with me, I never liked playing games on the living room, where everyone is watching, I grew up with nitpicky sisters and I pretty much suttered my self on my bedroom to play games during elementary school and early high school.

"What did I grew up with" not so much, I grew up with both the N64 and the PS1 and yet, I always prefer to game on my PC, but I think the turning point of ever deciding to go for a PC might have been emulation. I know I'm on a slippery slope talking about it, so I'll make it brief.

Emulation was a huge factor that pretty much converted me to PC gaming by the late 90's, the prospect of playing Chrono Trigger on my Pentium 1 laptop was astounding, to say the least. As always, I don't condone such practices, but back then, it was huge for me.

It also showed me that I could use a controller on a PC, so nowadays I play tons of "console like" games with a 360 controller on my PC.

On a more realistic note, console gaming is expensive as fuck in this country, that's pretty much why I have 500+ games on PC and less than 20 on my Wii U (and I'm counting my regular Wii games in there too). I sold my Xbox 360 that lasted an entire year, because the games that I was interested in were available on PC for far less money, also I was already used to multitask on my PC, so it was jarring as fuck to chat with the controller and to pay for basic multiplayer functionality, only to get yelled at by fucking 10 year olds in Halo 3.
 

TehAardvark

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I think you missed one point, what happened with me(though I admit my case might be rare):

I had a mixture of PC and consoles when I grew up in the 90s. Though I mostly played consoles, being able to communicate and play with people not in the room drew me into PC gaming as well so though my childhood and teenage years were spent console gaming the first chance I had to buy myself a system I went for a gaming PC for the reasons listed above. I built(for the time) a surprisingly powerful pc that could run any game for the next 2 years at maximum.... on paper.

The first time I popped in anything that would truly start tapping that powerful Gfx card(Arkham Asylum) I got horrendous slow-down to the point where by the time I was through the first cutscene I was getting 5 FPS! Naturally I assumed it was a glitch. Tried to fix it, failed. Tried to return it, learned that at the time that was basically impossible. Put it on the side and booted into another game I had bought for the PC(Star Wars: The Force Unleashed) and immediately encountered the same problem. This made me realize it was my SYSTEM that was likely the culprit so I did some digging and found out that the GFX card I had, while very powerful in theory, would over-heat in seconds and start chugging because it lacked proper ventilation. So I popped my case, grabbed a $10 fan and cranked it which allowed me to play my games at around 20 FPS, far from good, but manageable. I admit this was partly my fault for not researching the card enough(though I'd argue that as $hitty as the card was it shouldn't have been sold), so even though this was a horrible experience for me it wasn't the thing that turned me away.

What DID cause me to give up was admittedly not quite as bad as the first but it was the straw that broke my back. I, being a huge Star Wars nerd, was looking forward to the release of The Old Republic eagerly, got the game when it came out(didn't look as intensive as my other game so I thought the system would handle it alright). Got it home, popped in the disc, installed the game as soon as I could and hit launch.... error message, the game hadn't installed properly. Alright, had that happen before, reinstalled, same error. Had that happen too, completely wiped the game from the HDD, updated my drivers manually, ran anti-virus and anti-malware, and updated Windows manually. Install again, exact same message. Went online to get answers, got a support ticket and after all the standard advice they tell you got told they'd look into it.... still to this day haven't gotten an answer. After a couple weeks of trying to get to the bottom of this(only moderately proficient with computers) the only possible solution I could find was another problem with my system. Specifically I had a 4-core AMD and an nVidia GFX card, something I had no idea could cause a conflict as when I bought the system I didn't even know there was such competition between them. Now I still don't KNOW this is the problem, as I said I'm only moderately proficient, but it was the only problem that fit.

Now I know what you might be thinking, why didn't I just get a different card, an AMD? Two reasons: 1. I lacked the money. 2. I found out around the same time that my power supply was NOT uninterruptable and my system had a huge power draw so I would have to save up to replace both. On the other hand I had a perfectly serviceable 360(gift from my grandmother) and if I had a problem with a game not working on it they HAD to refund it.

So I turned into a console gamer and when it came time to replace my PC or upgrade to an Xbone/PS4 I went with the console, and I'd do it again. Not because I like consoles that much but because every time I would even LOOK INTO a gaming PC I'd remember the hassle and think to myself, "Can I really afford to drop a grand with no guarantees?"

I'm not saying PCs are bad, but the association is so negative when it comes to gaming that I don't know as I'll ever feel comfortable going back. I don't think I'm alone in this kind of illogical negative association and I fully believe there are people who have had the exact opposite situation. All I'm saying is a couple bad experiences can seriously influence your choice.
 

Souplex

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Me and my roommates all have TVs in our rooms, but don't have a shared living room.
More people have tvs in their rooms than they used to. Living room status is moot.
 

JUMBO PALACE

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I can see how all of these points could affect people but for me none of them were really an influence. I started with the N64 and PS1 then moved onto the Gamecube and Xbox then picked up a 360. Once this generation rolled around though I just figured I'd switch. didn't really have anything to do with friends or family, I just like the flexibility and utility PCs provide and the more open nature of the platfrom. The few exclusives consoles still have don't interest me to a large degree. Plus, call me a masochist, but I get a certain thrill out of the challenges and niche issues that can arise in PC gaming. Fiddling with software settings and trawling through forums to figure out a fix for a game or getting to watch fiascoes like the Arkham Knight disaster unfold can be pretty entertaining if you have a level head about it the whole thing.
 

Baresark

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It's always a dead end because you have people who argue the merits of their opinion. There are advantages to both and if you are a true gamer you probably go back and forth and are too busy enjoying games to give a shit about a bunch of idiots arguing about their chosen platform versus playing on it. I have a gaming PC but also PS4. For a while my PS4 was little more than a Bloodborne machine, and it's collecting dust... that is up until some of those awesome looking PS4 games I saw on the E3 coverage.

It's like being in the mood for a racing game or spectacle fighter. One is not better than the other, they are different and offer different experiences. And fights would work like this in that situation:

Racer: Man, racing games are the best thing around. They offer nearly infinite replayability.
Spectacle fighter: No, racing games are boring and stupid. If I wanted to drive I would just get into my car and do it rather than by a game that I do it in.
Racer: But I get to drive in cars that I would never get to in real life, so it's awesome. "oh look at me, I can button mash and things flash and sparkle, dur dur".
Spectacle Fighter: Only noobs would button mash, and the games I play button mashing would get you nowhere. You would die super easy, but I wouldn't expect a person who plays games where you drive around in circles to understand.

Just look at that.. isn't that silly looking. It's exactly how I feel when people champion a certain platform in debates. A reasonable human being recognizes that not everything is made with your specific desires in mind and it's OK that other people like different things.
 

Phoenixmgs_v1legacy

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Still, in every single one of these console vs PC things, it is said that PC games are cheaper, but that's not true because you lose out on resale value with PC games since it's pretty much all digital now. I can buy a game on release day and play it for 2-3 months and it only costs me around $20 (sometimes less). I have a friend that does his "tricks" (nothing illegal) and pays about half as much as I do (and sometimes even makes money on a game). I can choose to buy a game anytime I want on a console and I don't come close to paying $60 per game, I don't have to wait for sales or price drops.

In the end, choosing the console or PC as your main platform has more to do with your own preferences than one actually being superior to the other. I've said quite a few times in threads here that consoles are more popular due to the fact the console is located next to the TV and sound system whereas the PC isn't (for most people) only to have PC gamers say you can hook up a PC quite easily to a TV, which I'm fully aware of (in fact, my PC is connected to my TV) and missing the point entirely that most people don't have their PCs next to their TVs in the first place nor do they want them there either.

Phrozenflame500 said:
So many console arguments are so foreign to me though. Like, I own a console (a Wii U, I don't know if a PS4 is much easier), but accessing that console requires me to get, walk over to the living room, bend down, find the disk I want to play, enter the disk, turn on the console, wait for it to boot up, input my password using the awkward controller interface, navigate and press that "game" icon, then wait for that to load.

Compared to PC where it's two clicks and waiting for it to load.

I guess that's mostly because my PC is always on and Steam is always open, but even if it wasn't the case my PC boots up much faster then my console (again maybe the PS4 is different) and inputting passwords and menu navigation is infinitely easier with KB+M. Plus digital > physical IMO and dealing with console networks like PSN and *shutters* Nintendo eShop retroactively make me like Steam much much more.

I do agree that if you're into exclusives or if your friends pick one or if your furniture situation is bad a console might be the better option though. And it isn't *really* as big a deal as the fanboys would like you to believe.
I don't have a WiiU (but I will at some point for Bayonetta 2) but it seems really weird that you'd have to input your password every time, I do remember reading the WiiU's OS is pretty sluggish though. The PS4 is really so much better than the PS3. The PS4 (and PS3) boot up as fast or faster as a PC with a SSD because I believe both systems have the OS stored on flash memory. Since the PS4 does everything in the background from installing to updating games; once you put in the disc for the 1st time, you're playing the game within 2 minutes (as the vast majority of the game install happens as you're playing the game). Whereas the PS3 you had to wait for the game to install (like 10-15 minutes) and you couldn't download game patches in the background either.
 

Tsun Tzu

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Well...it's a matter of preference that encompasses everything from your preferred genres to your living situation and budget.

Personally, I grew up with consoles and PCs in somewhat equal parts. We had Nintendos and Sega systems from the time I was about, what, 6-7? I have particularly fond memories of all the blowing. So much blowing, man. I was almost like a job with how much I was doing it.

I prefer PC for any sort of genre that requires precision targeting (FPS, RTS, FPSRPG, etc.) and generally like consoles, or at least the controllers, for third person games and platformers.

I also greatly enjoy the amount of control I have over my PC. I'm not limited by or beholden to a certain company and I can use it for any and all media I want to consume. Same for laptops, which effectively function as a console for me anyway since they're a lot more mobile and versatile than a desktop.

The waters have become somewhat muddier with the whole being able to use console controllers for PC thing so...I effectively have the best of both worlds now.

PC keeps getting used and will continue to be used. My 360 and PS3 have been largely forgotten about for years now.
 

DrunkOnEstus

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I play on both PC and console (I need my exclusives, you know), and I feel like the furniture and living situation thing doesn't apply to me and shouldn't have to apply to many people.

When I play PC games, I turn on the PC that's in my living room on the stand next to my PS3, sit on the couch, pull out the coffee table drawer with a wireless keyboard to open Steam or whatever, and kick back in Big Picture mode with a wireless DualShock 3, or WiiMote, or whatever it might be. If I'm playing a fighting game/shmup, virtually every arcade stick works. Same goes for racing wheels and the games that use them.

The bugbear here is immediately obvious, and it's that it can be kind of a pain for me to play games that really do need keyboard and mouse control (Pillars of Eternity, DA:O, etc). I can set the KB&M on the table, but that really isn't comfortable. I've gotten totally used to playing FPS with a controller (I can pretty much kill it playing Titanfall and CS:GO on PC that way, which I wasn't expecting to do at all). That's the only negative I can think of though. If a game is on both PS3 and PC, I get to use the same controller, with higher resolution and FPS and total control over the experience as well as mods...it's not even a contest. It's just a shame that there's no PC version of The Last of Us, Dragon's Dogma (man that game could really use it), Red Dead Redemption, and so on. I imagine if I got some kind of lap table for the KB&M games I'd be totally golden.
 

Imperioratorex Caprae

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I had one foot in both pools pretty well from the get-go. I've always been a person who appreciates both console and PC for different reasons. I remember when PC games were neat and way different than console games (for the most part), and some still are. I always saw PC as not an alternative but an addition to, or consoles being the addition... either way they compliment each other but I can see why for people with hardline budgets, its difficult to own more than one platform.
 

Clive Howlitzer

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For myself, I was both. My first gaming system was a NES and my Dad also had a crappy computer that I remember screwing around with as early as when it was just an orange and black display running DOS. My first PC game was Doom and I loved it. PC gave experiences I couldn't get on console and vice versa. I loved them both.

It was only after the PS2 era that I finally gave up on console and focused purely on PC, after having been both for the whole time. Once consoles started becoming less powerful PCs, without all the perks, I basically moved onto pure PC. The gaps in the two started to become a lot more noticeable to me and most games came out on PC anyway. Combined with the fact I can use any control scheme on PC and have unlimited backwards compatibility, it just made sense. I always look into every console generation to perhaps win me back to picking one up but it never really happens.

And now that Street Fighter V has cross platform play with PS4, even less reason!
 

Kathinka

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Three reasons:

First, my two favorite genres are RTS and FPS, both firmly at home on PC. There is few RTS on consoles, and those that exist control terrible. First person shooters suffer immensely from controller input. I want my performance ingame to be limited by my own abilities, not stopped by a ceiling imposed by an imprecise input device.

Second, complexity. I like games that are a bit more deep and complex than the average CoD. Things like ArmA, Battlefield 2, Project Reality and Insurgency are absolutely unfathomable on consoles because of input and hardware limitations.

Thirdly, I don't want to pay premium for yesterdays hardware. I rather invest the few hours it takes to get ones head around building and operating a PC and save a ton of money on a device costing less, yet still outperforming consoles and being able to do anything they can do. I can understand people being willing to pay extra for convenience, and hey, good for them. But I'm a tinkerer at heart and always want to understand how everything works, so for me it's not really a choice.
 

Thyunda

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erbkaiser said:
I am a console AND PC gamer.

Typically, any game coming out on both I'll prefer to play on the PS4 for the following reasons:
1) Easier: I just slap the disk in and play
2) No incompatibility with drivers, controllers, DRM, phase of the moon... it just works
3) A controller is the superior interface for anything not requiring mouse precision.
4) My PC is getting on in age and I can't get a constant framerate in all cases... and I've upgraded it enough to make me have to buy completely new instead. And if faced with spending 2000 on a new PC or potentially buying 400-500 games, guess what I prefer.

HOWEVER, a lot of games simply will never work on a console so I play those on PC. Games like Crusader Kings 2, Civilization; Indie titles; retro classics; moddable games.

By owning a PC and a console I have the best of both worlds. The only things I "miss" out on are Nintendo exclusives, and Nintendo is getting increasingly more removed from what I consider relevant to my gaming tastes each generation, and whatever games Microsoft traps behinds wads of cash to keep it away from PS4 for a limited time.
Worth it.
I came here to say basically this. Even those same games. I can lose hours in my brother's Xbox One because it's in his room and he has a sofa up there that I can just recline on and play till I have to go do grownup things. The only flaw is that he goes to bed earlier than I do because he starts work at 8am and I'm a university student and am unfamiliar with the concept. When it comes to playing PC games, a desktop wasn't really an option because I'd lose the rights to it immediately. Family of five - if I bought a PC, it'd have to go somewhere in the house and that just doesn't fit with my mother's design plans. If she chose to renovate again, I'd lose access to the PC for the duration. Even if there's no renovation, I'd have to share the PC with my brothers because hey, it's my parents' electricity.
No such fuss with a laptop. Sure, in two years time it'll be so outdated it won't even run Future Minesweeper, but it's good for what I want to play now, like the Total War series or Civ or the Paradox family, but I can't do it for extended periods of time because I either lose the feeling in my legs or use the squeaky, uncomfortable dining chairs.

And I've never, ever given a shit about Nintendo. My first console was the Sega Megadrive. From there, the PSOne, then it was Playstation 2, then Xbox 360. Had a Gameboy Colour, and that's the closest I ever got to Nintendo.
 

rgrekejin

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I dunno. I feel like these factors are sometimes applicable and sometimes not. I grew up principally playing console games, really coming of age as a gamer in the N64 generation. I played various other systems and handhelds over the years, with no real experience as a PC gamer save for a few old shareware games on my parents' old Powermac and Oregon Trail at school. But two years ago I jumped ship from console to PC, because console gaming just failed to meet my needs with the new generation. Much as I love Nintendo, most of the major franchise releases I look forward to aren't coming out on the WiiU. They just aren't. I was disgusted with the (at the time) mandatory Kinect Microsoft was attempting to force on us, and although I'll usually pick up one of their consoles late in the generation for exclusives, I'll never make a Sony console my primary gaming machine until they learn to make a controller that isn't (in my opinion) a complete piece of shit. Without really changing anything about what I was doing as a gamer, PC became basically the only avenue open to me. I still mostly play on my TV from the couch. I still use a controller. I didn't change. But gaming changed around me, and pushed me to PC. Ultimately, I'm quite happy with the outcome - the fringe benefits of PC gaming are terrific, and as a console gamer I'd not really been aware that some of them even existed.
 

schmulki

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infohippie said:
On some rare occasions you might have needed to write a boot sequence (config.sys, autoexec.bat) designed to push everything possible into high memory to free up enough lower memory for a game.
That right there is MUCH more than enough to turn off many gamers. Then there's driver issues. Then there's issues of which settings do I need to turn down/off to make the game not run like garbage. It just kinda keeps going on like that.

infohippie said:
It was a bit more expensive than console gaming for a while, when the early 3D cards came out, but the hardware price differential has been steadily dropping ever since and the games themselves have always been cheaper on a PC. "Extremely costly", however, not at all.
The problem was, for a while there, you'd buy a video card, use it for one big game, then the next game comes out, and you're either barely able to run the game or are running it on the lowest settings possible. You had to constantly be upgrading hardware, which made it VERY expensive to keep up with. That has certainly calmed down over time, and I've now gotten aobut 4 years out of my 7850 so far, and expect to eek out another year before replacing it.
 

Doozie

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I play on both but prefer PC. The selection of games feels so much more open and varied.
 

UrinalDook

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It's an interesting breakdown, Shamus, and I agree with you that this argument never gets anywhere because people ignore the broader, more personal factors.

However, I'm not sure that really matches up with my experience. Basically, I was a console gamer during my teens pretty much purely because of Halo. Once I got out of uni and started earning some money, though, I simply saw some friends playing on PC, decided it was far, far better and that I was going to have to change.

This was ground up. I had absolutely nothing that made the transition an easy one. I didn't have a comfy desk chair, I didn't have a proper computer desk, I didn't have a monitor, I didn't really have the space and I had no clue what I was doing when it came to part picking, checking or assembly. It's been a slow, arduous process. For two years, I was hooked up to 720p TV I used to use for the Xbox until I could get a proper 1080p monitor. I used a crappy wireless mouse for the first year, and it took me two and a half years to finally afford a decent mechanical keyboard. My seating quality has, if anything, degraded as I'm still on a creaky, ancient dining chair. When I upgraded my GPU after two years, it blew up my power supply because in my naivete I'd cheaped out on it initially.

And it was all totally worth it. But I understand why it's not for everyone.

Ultimately, I think the argument is pointless because neither side is willing to face facts: PC gaming is objectively better than console gaming on the simple metric that a PC can be made, with the right amount of work, to do anything a console can, and naturally has the ability to do many things better. But PC gaming is also considerably more expensive. And not just in terms of flat out costs, but personally. PC gaming is a drain on your wallet and your time. And I think the latter is something a lot of PC gamers forget, often because they've already invested a significant amount of time without realising simply by learning, reading articles, being interested in their hobby.

Permit me to demonstrate:

erbkaiser said:
I am a console AND PC gamer.

Typically, any game coming out on both I'll prefer to play on the PS4 for the following reasons:
1) Easier: I just slap the disk in and play
I just open steam, click play and play. Because I've already invested the time to download and configure, but now I don't even have to spare thirty seconds on case opening and disc swapping.

Meanwhile, this is become harder to say about consoles as mandatory installs become more and more common.

erbkaiser said:
2) No incompatibility with drivers, controllers, DRM, phase of the moon... it just works
A fair enough point, but honestly I think this gets a little over-exaggerated as an argument against the PC. Older games can be hell to get working sure, but I've yet to come across a brand new game that straight up refuses to work. Maybe I'm just lucky in that regard, but debacles like Arkham Knight really are an extreme minority.

erbkaiser said:
3) A controller is the superior interface for anything not requiring mouse precision.
Opinion, but also sort of irrelevant. You can get any current gen controller to work on PC, usually with a minimum of hassle. But again, there is that slight time cost when compared to the 'literally works seconds out of the box' functionality of consoles.

erbkaiser said:
4) My PC is getting on in age and I can't get a constant framerate in all cases... and I've upgraded it enough to make me have to buy completely new instead. And if faced with spending 2000 on a new PC or potentially buying 400-500 games, guess what I prefer.
I've never understood this argument. The same is true for consoles, only you can't upgrade a console. If you can't get decent performance in a new game, maybe just accept that you can't play games at max settings anymore. The hardware I have in my PC is better than an Xbone. That will now never not be true. Sure, one day I'll have to run newer games at lower settings, but only because the thresholds have shifted. Even good optimisation won't allow a future Xbone game to run better than it would on my PC with its current setup, even if in the future Low setting has come to be equivalent of the Xbone version where it's somewhere between Medium and High now.

But again, beating or even matching the performance of a console will cost you. Especially if you live outside the States.


erbkaiser said:
By owning a PC and a console I have the best of both worlds. The only things I "miss" out on are Nintendo exclusives, and Nintendo is getting increasingly more removed from what I consider relevant to my gaming tastes each generation, and whatever games Microsoft traps behinds wads of cash to keep it away from PS4 for a limited time.
Worth it.
Funnily enough, the only console I think would be worth owning for me, as a PC gamer, is the Wii-U. Because it remembers that the best thing about a console is the easy multiplayer - getting a bunch of your friends round and having some simple fun. Games like Mario Kart, Super Smash Bros and Mario Party bend over backwards to cater to local multiplayer in a way Playstation and Xbox seem to have forgotten.
 

MoltenSilver

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There's one big sort-of 'beyond your control' factor I think you left out here: you played what your friends played. If your friends had PlayStation, that meant you needed a PlayStation. If your friends were were playing Halo, you needed an xbox, and so on and so on.
 

Something Amyss

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Most of my recent game purchases are PC.

I own a current gen console pretty much because I know that no matter how perfect PC gaming might be, I have friends I want to play with who can't be bothered. A couple years back, I saw Rich from ReviewTechUSA basically voice this in a way that really helped me understand that.

I might be better to service your own car, but I'm never going to do that.
It might be better to grow your own food, but I'm never going to do that.
So why, then, yell at my friends because they're never going to service their own PC or put in the legwork to make games work?
My primary determining factors for where to buy are who I'll play it with, and what the price is.

EeviStev said:
Go Team Gamepad.
Though I am still very much in that camp. Most games I play work with a gamepad and I will keep using one.
 

JSRevenge

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I'm a PC guy, and it's almost entirely due to price point. We have a PC because we need a PC. On top of that framework, I can spend 100-200 dollars on my birthday or Christmas and treat myself to a stick of RAM and a video card, or a new monitor, or a new headset, because the rest of the year I can play $2-$15 Steam games and F2P Blizzard titles. It's mostly about the money.

We have a Wii (and had a PS3, which I sold), but I couldn't justify buying anything for it, and haven't for a long time (obviously). $60 is pretty steep for something I'll play to completion and then shelve.

EDIT: I am totally getting a Steam Link (and maybe a Steam controller) for my birthday this year (it comes out the day before). I'm not sure where that falls as far as the overall argument goes, but it's nice to play on a couch every once in a while.
 

Dalisclock

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MoltenSilver said:
There's one big sort-of 'beyond your control' factor I think you left out here: you played what your friends played. If your friends had PlayStation, that meant you needed a PlayStation. If your friends were were playing Halo, you needed an xbox, and so on and so on.
That only applies if you're into multi-player. If your more into the single player scene, then it doesn't really matter what your friends are playing on.
 

MoltenSilver

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Dalisclock said:
MoltenSilver said:
There's one big sort-of 'beyond your control' factor I think you left out here: you played what your friends played. If your friends had PlayStation, that meant you needed a PlayStation. If your friends were were playing Halo, you needed an xbox, and so on and so on.
That only applies if you're into multi-player. If your more into the single player scene, then it doesn't really matter what your friends are playing on.
I partly disagree. Even with single-player experiences if your friends are all on xbox consoles playing xbox exclusive games, then that's what's going to probably be a big topic discussed within your group of friends. If you aren't playing the same games, you are then going to be the odd-one-out when, for example, people are discussing the various branches they chose in an rpg and their experiences, while you can't contribute to the discussion.

Of course this is going to vary a lot from friendship to friendship. If you have plenty of other aspects to your group of friends and videogames is a tiny part, then it might not matter at all. But when I was in high school video games were the biggest common ground for my group of friends. The most pertinent reason (There were others, but this is what made any other choice basically irrelevant) I got an xbox 360 over a PS3* was because that's the console that my friends were getting, and not picking that same one meant being unintentionally-but-none-the-less ostracized from a large amount of conversations and interactions.

*I did get a PS3 much, much, much later, after the PS4 came out, due to them being dirt-cheap and stores doing anything to get PS3 consoles and games off the shelves to make space. Also I was/am a big PC gamer, but that came from before I met these people and PC gaming was a much smaller subset within my group of friends, as opposed to 360's which everyone had.
 

Zen Bard

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While I agree with Shamus that the argument ultimately comes down to personal preference, it's not always dependent on outside influences beyond our control.

I grew up as a PC gamer on my dad's Apple IIe (yeah...it was a loooooong time ago). So PC gaming was just what I knew. And it was pretty safe since the "gaming industry" was just begining then. When it finally took off, PC gaming became more complex. There was a much greater variety of games from which to choose and had varying ranges of processor intensity. Soon if I wanted to play a particular game, I had to upgrade my motherboard and graphics card, download new drivers, find and apply game patches and probably tune my system.

It got to a point where I was upgrading my system every time a new "Elder Scrolls" game came out.

Eventually, I had enough.

So I flipped to a console. I lloved the fact that, for the most part, I could just pop the disk in and go. No tuning, no loading drivers or patches and no upgrading hardare everytime a cool new game came out. It was also nice to play a game on a 48" TV while reclined on the couch as opposed to being hunched over a desk looking at a smaller screen. However the graphics quality isn't as high on admittedly, a last gen console as a custom build PC.

So I currently juggle both platforms. But as a standard, I'll probably play major Triple A games on the console but play Indie or "classic" games on the PC.
 

laggyteabag

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At this point, I am pretty much a PC gamer. I made the transition a couple of years ago after the last generation of consoles were more than showing their age, and I really wanted to play World of Warcraft on something that wasn't a shitty laptop. Since then, I realised that I just preferred playing games on my PC, as I just had more options (control scheme, graphics, mods, etc).

Consoles do still have a very special place in my heart, as I do own an Xbox One that I play Halo and Destiny on, but all of my friends, and the majority of my games are on PC, and there is absolutely no evidence of that changing any time soon.
 

infohippie

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schmulki said:
infohippie said:
On some rare occasions you might have needed to write a boot sequence (config.sys, autoexec.bat) designed to push everything possible into high memory to free up enough lower memory for a game.
That right there is MUCH more than enough to turn off many gamers. Then there's driver issues. Then there's issues of which settings do I need to turn down/off to make the game not run like garbage. It just kinda keeps going on like that.
Yeah, but the last time I had to do something like that was... 1996? It hasn't been an issue for literally decades. I'm still not sure what you mean by "driver issues". You install your video card's driver, install the game, and play. When there's a new driver out you install that one and get slightly better performance. And most games have a button to click that will determine optimal settings for your card, and Nvidia at least (I bet probably AMD too) also have a similar feature built in to their software that will pick the optimal settings for most well known games. You really only have to delve into the graphics options if you want to choose a specific balance or mix of features according to your own preferences.

infohippie said:
It was a bit more expensive than console gaming for a while, when the early 3D cards came out, but the hardware price differential has been steadily dropping ever since and the games themselves have always been cheaper on a PC. "Extremely costly", however, not at all.
The problem was, for a while there, you'd buy a video card, use it for one big game, then the next game comes out, and you're either barely able to run the game or are running it on the lowest settings possible. You had to constantly be upgrading hardware, which made it VERY expensive to keep up with. That has certainly calmed down over time, and I've now gotten aobut 4 years out of my 7850 so far, and expect to eek out another year before replacing it.
Yeah that was the case for a while, but again, it hasn't been an issue for a VERY long time. Mostly due to consoles, actually - you could buy a cheap mid-range card and play most AAA games on similar quality levels to the console version (or a little higher even), and thanks to consoles remaining the same for most of a decade you did not have to upgrade your card at all unless you were trying for significantly higher quality than the console version. Now with the new consoles you can once again buy a cheap mid range card and be at or above new generation console quality. Again, you can stick with that same card for the duration of this console generation and only upgrade when the NEXT generation comes out.

I do understand your arguments, but they are between ten and twenty years out of date. All of the "problems" you bring up are simply not the case any more, and haven't been for a long time.
 

FalloutJack

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Truth is, I'm a dynamic gamer, having done both, but it's obvious to anybody that knows me that consoles are my strength. Even while dual-classing, I am a console gamer. That is the control format in which I prefer and am best at. Need proof? Compare my playing of an FPS (or in third-person, for that matter) on either system and just see which one is awkward for me. My muscle memory and coordination favors a handheld device. You can thank years of Atari, Nintendo, Sega, and Sony systems.
 

BramblinTheGnome

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Makes sense. I need a computer for my job, so instead of buying both a computer and a console I just buy a slightly better computer than I would otherwise get. In the long run the extra cash I pump into my computer to bring it up to gaming status is way less than it would cost to switch to console gaming. Plus, I have a nice work space in my office and my living room tends to be dominated by my significant other who is usually watching some horrible show on Netflix that I would prefer to avoid.

As for the difficulty of getting PC games to work, my first experience with gaming was back in the NES days. I thought it was much easier following simple DOS prompt instructions to get a game installed and running than the voodoo needed to get an aging NES system to actually play a game. I know that neither of those situations have anything to do w/ current age gaming, but it's hard to shake earliest experiences.
 

Shamus Young

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I am a PC Gamer because I am not a rich, "path of least resistance" person.

I dont know why Eastern Europe is PC Land and the West is consolized, but I am sure the fact that life in the "West" in general is easier, calmer and generally people there are quite a bit richer is part of it.

So people just pay more for the lesser experience because it is easier I guess. ANd because they can.
*Sorry, that is how it IS here. Consoles are MUCH more expensive, and from what I have seen in Germany, the UK and Spain, it still is MORE expensive than PC Gaming by A LOT.
 

Xman490

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"A gaming PC costs more than a console.

Ah, but console games cost more than PC games, so you pay more in the long run."

Actually, AAA games tend to follow a set path on pricing on all platforms (except for Nintendo's, in which discounts are half as deep and frequent): $60 on launch, $40 after a few months, $20 after around a year, and maybe on a subscription service afterwards.

The points to be made is that PC game discounts are way more common than console game discounts, and PC games eventually go for $10 or cheaper. See: Steam/GOG/GMG sales.
 

Pitzotl

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Well I had NES, SNES, PS2, GC, Wii and X360. Right now I have PS3 and NDS. I never touch PS3 (to be honest it has been in the drawer for quite some time) and I keep NDS just because I love it so much (and because I STILL have some long-ass JRPGs to finish some day, also Picross 3D). Gamepads are worse that keyboard+mouse in every situation for me, except for Wiimote which found pretty stellar use in some of Wii titles. But I'm a PC gamer from the childhood. PC has point-n-click adventures of Sierra, LucasArts and Legend Entertainment, roguelikes, CRPGs such as Fallout, Arcanum and Neverwinter Nights, puzzles like those of Zachtronics or Incredible Machine (Contraption Maker these days), global strategy games, all kinds of unique stuff you wouldn't find on any console. Not that I dislike consoles, I had a lot of fun with all major Nintendo stuff, those Marios and Metroids, I liked now crapware genre of JRPG (Dragon Quests, Final Fantasies, Shin Megami Tensei Series). But all in all I just found that most of my favorite games are PC games and I will always own a PC (because it's past 20th century already, come on, there is not a single thing better than a computer in the world). The current console generation is underwhelming, uninspired and useless, to say the least. It probably won't be the last, but there is really no point anymore, there is no advantage in a "console" whatsoever, just look at them - they're just cheap PC-analogues with less features and proprietary corporate shenanigans. Hell, they're even less powerful than a mid-range desktop. I remember the days when I looked at GTA3, then exclusive to PS2, and thought - what kind of a technical miracle is that thing, my PC is no match for this wonderbox! And it wasn't only my PC, that was the whole point. But those times are long over.
So... I started from ZX Spectrum and Commodore 64 and my first games were over there (River Raid! Blue Max!). The idea of a console seemed alien to me ever since, even when I started playing them because of their "exclusives".
 

CrystalShadow

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I don't know. considering I have a console hooked up to a computer monitor sitting on my desk. (it does double duty as my pc monitor), and I've seen others with that arrangement too, I find the living room/desk thing a little flaky as an argument.

Granted, from what I've come across, the 'console on a desk' thing usually comes as a result of those of us that didn't choose pc or console, but chose PC and console.

The history stuff seems more definitive though.

I'm not really old enough for the atari era, but I'm too old for the playstation era to have had much influence, and way too old for the xbox.

I grew up in the Nintendo vs Sega era. And, well, we all know what that means for sega fans. (which I wasn't)

I also had exposure to pc's and PC games at a young age.

Lo and behold, by setup for about as long as I can remember has been PC + Nintendo console.
Which makes a nice complement.
There's some overlap, but for the most part they have different kinds of games, so having both broadens my options a lot.
Compared to the other console options, which would represent far more overlap with a PC.

Thing about PC's is, most people have them anyway.
They may not be awesome gaming systems, but you can still game on most of them.

That makes a PC ironically possibly a cheaper option than a console, because you already have it anyway.
This is all the more true if you, or someone in your family has a job that already demands a fairly capable PC...

Remember that a $5000 PC is great and all, but you can still find tons of games that'll run happily enough on a $300 PC too.
That's easily forgotten sometimes.

Anyway, yeah... History probably does matter...
 

Dollabillyall

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I dunno about the "hundreds of dollars worth of furniture" needed to do a normal pc gaming session. You can buy a decent desk chair for about $30, I dont know anyone who actually uses a keyboard drawer, you don't really need much lighting to play a PC game. Even a decent desk can be bought for $50 or less if you know how to shop or use craigslist. Don't fool yourself into thinking you need a $200 chair and a $350 desk just to play a PC game.
You can also choose to get an HDMI cable for $10 and one of those TV-dinner tably thingies and play the PC games using your TV as a monitor (and maybe even a controller instead of mouse+keyboard). Or someone in the opposite situation can plug their console into their desktop monitor and play a console at a desk. I do both these things, depending on what my girlfriend is doing (watching tv or working) I just switch a single cable around and hey presto I can choose both console and PC gaming either at my desk or on my couch.

As for what I grew up with/what's available... I grew up with both PC and console gaming and I currently have both available. The big difference is that I use my PC for a million other applications and that warrants the PC being an up-to-date technological beast while I only bought a PS3 when the PS4 came out so I could play the exclusives but still get them for cheap. You don't actually have to buy a console for retail price. Just wait for the next generation to come out and pick one up for 20% of the cost and buy entire libraries of games for steam summer sale prices as more hasty fanboy people are scraping together every dollar they can to buy the newest console (with it's bugs and limited release titles). I bought a good condition PS3 superslim 500gb with two controllers and 20 games (including GTA5) for $150.

Honestly at the end of the day I don't even understand why there is still a divide between console and PC. Anyone can own both and actually a console is already so much like a PC that I don't understand why they are still seperate entities.