What War Movies had the biggest impact on you?

Gordon_4

The Big Engine
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Apr 3, 2020
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Australia
Going to add "Breaker Morant" to that, Australian soldiers in the Boer War have been up to somewhat morally grey stuff in a very morally grey war and the British decide they are politically expendable and put on a show trial.



Yeah there's a weird thing that crops up there.
“Shoot straight you bastards”
 
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Johnny Novgorod

Bebop Man
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Apr 10, 2020
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Not to repeat a lot of great, obvious picks: Sam Peckinpah's The Iron Cross is fantastic and a rare take on the WW2 Russian front from the German side.
 
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Kae

The Void
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So I know it was mentioned before by @Ezekiel but I want to elaborate on why it's important to me and why it had a huge impact on me personally, especially since the first time I watched it I was like 6 years old, maybe 5.

Schindler's List: So it was probably the first war movie I ever watched that wasn't about the soldiers, while there are plenty of anti-war war movies, I don't think I'd ever thought of how hard it must be to survive a war zone, and this movie showed it to me, how hard it was, how scary it was, how even among that misery and hopelessness there's still small moments of joy still to be found, and how solidarity can really make a difference, but also how an evil man can become a good man and what it means to live with regret.

So, getting to that, I genuinely feel like part of my hatred of Capitalism comes from this movie, I think a lot of people forget because by the end of the movie he's done so much good and saved so many lives, but the reason why that speech at the end is so hard-hitting, is because he's right he could have saved more people, but also because he was a monster that wanted to use the Jews as cheap labour and didn't even think of them as people at the beginning at least, it was through working with them and slowly getting to know them that he began to empathise and sympathise with them, that he realised that the system that he directly benefited from and not only participated in but encouraged, that it was pure evil and corrupt and it ruined people's lives, and that's why the speech hits hard, because he's guilty of it, he was a Nazi supporter, he wanted this, he helped bring this about and no matter how many times the people tell him it was enough, he will never undo that, in his mind he will forever be guilty and even if he had sold the watch and the car, and everything else it would have never been enough.

Look maybe it's because I'm also haunted by guilt of the sins I committed in my past, and I know what it's like to do good deeds and never feeling like it's enough to justify it, like no matter what I do it'll always be there and I'll always be evil, but that message hits me really hard, to the point where it's impossible for me to watch this movie without crying, between the tragedy of the Holocaust, Schindler's life and what it reminds me of, it's just a movie that it's special to me, it makes me feel things that no other movie makes me feel, it also showed me my emotional growth as I remember one of the reason my family called me an emotionless robot was because I didn't cry at this movie, but now I can, probably because of all the bad choices I made that made sympathise with Schindler.
 

Dwarvenhobble

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I've not seen a lot of war movies honestly. Kind of not my thing.

One I will say had an impact would be

Deathwatch

It's a horror movie set in the trenches in World War 1 which not that common in terms of horror film settings. To say much more requires me to use spoilers really.


Due to all the blood that has been spilled in the fighting and Trenches the barbed wire itself that lines much of the battlefield and trenches has come alive possibly with the help of something else too
 
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gorfias

Unrealistic but happy
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I've not seen a lot of war movies honestly. Kind of not my thing.

One I will say had an impact would be

Deathwatch

It's a horror movie set in the trenches in World War 1 which not that common in terms of horror film settings. To say much more requires me to use spoilers really.


Due to all the blood that has been spilled in the fighting and Trenches the barbed wire itself that lines much of the battlefield and trenches has come alive possibly with the help of something else too
I'd not heard of it before! Sounds interesting. I'll look for it but it's supposed to be rare now.
 

ralfy

Elite Member
Legacy
Apr 24, 2020
111
28
33
The Human Condition

Come and See

The Burmese Harp

Apocalypse Now

Fires on the Plain

Oro, Plata, Mata

Breaker Morant

Ran

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

Paths of Glory

Kanal

Alexander Nevsky

Soldier of Orange

The Red and the White

The Cranes are Flying

Henry V

Das Boot

Playing for Time

Diamonds of the Night

Hope and Glory

Reds

On the Beach

Stalingrad

The Shop on Main Street

Lawrence of Arabia

Au revoir les enfants

Patton

Throne of Blood

Schindler's List

The Assault

Gallipoli

Three Godless Years

Coming Home

The Killing Fields

Cross of Iron

King Rat

Grand Illusion

Kagemusha

Catch-22

Europa, Europa

Zulu

Lacombe, Lucien

Barry Lyndon

The Deer Hunter

The Wannsee Conference

Gettysburg

The Big Red One
 
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Gordon_4

The Big Engine
Legacy
Apr 3, 2020
992
466
68
Australia
The Human Condition

Come and See

The Burmese Harp

Apocalypse Now

Fires on the Plain

Oro, Plata, Mata

Breaker Morant

Ran

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

Paths of Glory

Kanal

Alexander Nevsky

Soldier of Orange

The Red and the White

The Cranes are Flying

Henry V

Das Boot

Playing for Time

Diamonds of the Night

Hope and Glory

Reds

On the Beach

Stalingrad

The Shop on Main Street

Lawrence of Arabia

Au revoir les enfants

Patton

Throne of Blood

Schindler's List

The Assault

Gallipoli

Three Godless Years

Coming Home

The Killing Fields

Cross of Iron

King Rat

Grand Illusion

Kagemusha

Catch-22

Europa, Europa

Zulu

Lacombe, Lucien

Barry Lyndon

The Deer Hunter

The Wannsee Conference

Gettysburg

The Big Red One
That is a very respectable list of movies. I’d also recommend “All Quite on the Western Front”
 

Exley97

Senior Member
Legacy
Apr 11, 2020
90
90
23
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United States
Come and See, man. Never liked most of the American ones. But that movie is a fucking masterpiece. Everyone should see it.
Cosign.

After years of hearing about this movie and the methology around it (it was hard to find because it's a Soviet film from 1985), I finally caught it on the Criterion Channel and holy hell, it's BRUTAL. A masterpiece, but fucking brutal.

If you're interested in Soviet/Russian war movies, check out The Ascent. It's also a WWII film, and it was directed by Larisa Shepitko, the wife of Come and See director Elem Kilmov. Not as great as Come and See, but excellent in its own right and nearly as brutal.
 
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happyninja42

Elite Member
Legacy
May 7, 2020
1,691
787
118
So I know it was mentioned before by @Ezekiel but I want to elaborate on why it's important to me and why it had a huge impact on me personally, especially since the first time I watched it I was like 6 years old, maybe 5.

Schindler's List: So it was probably the first war movie I ever watched that wasn't about the soldiers, while there are plenty of anti-war war movies, I don't think I'd ever thought of how hard it must be to survive a war zone, and this movie showed it to me, how hard it was, how scary it was, how even among that misery and hopelessness there's still small moments of joy still to be found, and how solidarity can really make a difference, but also how an evil man can become a good man and what it means to live with regret.

So, getting to that, I genuinely feel like part of my hatred of Capitalism comes from this movie, I think a lot of people forget because by the end of the movie he's done so much good and saved so many lives, but the reason why that speech at the end is so hard-hitting, is because he's right he could have saved more people, but also because he was a monster that wanted to use the Jews as cheap labour and didn't even think of them as people at the beginning at least, it was through working with them and slowly getting to know them that he began to empathise and sympathise with them, that he realised that the system that he directly benefited from and not only participated in but encouraged, that it was pure evil and corrupt and it ruined people's lives, and that's why the speech hits hard, because he's guilty of it, he was a Nazi supporter, he wanted this, he helped bring this about and no matter how many times the people tell him it was enough, he will never undo that, in his mind he will forever be guilty and even if he had sold the watch and the car, and everything else it would have never been enough.

Look maybe it's because I'm also haunted by guilt of the sins I committed in my past, and I know what it's like to do good deeds and never feeling like it's enough to justify it, like no matter what I do it'll always be there and I'll always be evil, but that message hits me really hard, to the point where it's impossible for me to watch this movie without crying, between the tragedy of the Holocaust, Schindler's life and what it reminds me of, it's just a movie that it's special to me, it makes me feel things that no other movie makes me feel, it also showed me my emotional growth as I remember one of the reason my family called me an emotionless robot was because I didn't cry at this movie, but now I can, probably because of all the bad choices I made that made sympathise with Schindler.
One thing I really enjoyed about the story of Schindler, is that I actually did a little bit of genetic diversity research, to see what would be the "minimum safe gene pool" for any society to be limited to, without a risk of recursive inbreeding traits becoming ultimately lethal. And the rough number I found was around 2000 members. Well, Schindler is attributed to saving roughly 1200 himself. So, even if every other Jew was killed, that was almost enough, from that one person's actions, to preserve that genetic line. I thought that was pretty cool, and a telling thing on a personal level.

I've never been a big fan of culture, in the context of what most people use it for, as lately I find our obsession with culture leads to a lot of terrible behavior, on the basis of cultural purity, or preservation, etc. It's why I actually find the war movie Monument Men to be a really terrible film. All those men, dying to save....stuff. It's just...I don't care, I find lives more important to stuff, any day. But, this particular bit of leather and pigment is somehow priceless, "because culture". Meh.

But with Schindler, the actual preservation of a people, a genetic variety of humans, that can help to keep humanity diverse, was preserved, a significant number of them. And there's now I think like...*does a quick check* 8500 roughly as of 2012, so that's really cool. Given the way populations usually exponentially increase with subsequent generations, it will be interesting to see how many eventually stem from his rescue attempt. How, eventually, it might end up sort of like how many Asian people can trace their lineage to Genghis Khan. I also enjoy how, after the war, when Schindler was never able to really establish himself financially again, the various families that he saved, basically all took care of him until he died. Returning the favor by caring for him.