130: No Cleric Left Behind

Lacey Coleman

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Dec 31, 2007
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No Cleric Left Behind

"Assistant Marco Ginsberg, one of 18 student staff members at the program, worked at the Roleplay Workshop for three. He says he has helped the kids flesh out the basic math skills they need to create characters and do battle. 'Watching a student who previously couldn't understand the concept of averaging memorize it after a few stat checks is a special joy in itself,' Ginsberg says."

Lacey Coleman speaks to the founders of The Roleplay Workshop, helping kids to learn through gaming.


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Lacey Coleman

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Dec 31, 2007
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What interests me is the idea that these students need to go through a type of "Games-Master" school in order to run the games, and that they willingly do so.

I'd be intersted in knowing more about what exactly they teach (and how) because, especially as we move more into sandbox type environments online, where people are expected to make up their own stories, I can see the skills learned there becoming actual work skills.
 

Dom Camus

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Sep 8, 2006
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better interpersonal and work ethic skills, more responsible attitude towards their jobs

This isn't surprising, because too many jobs don't really require much skill per-se, just a willingness to tolerate mind-numbing tedium for most of your waking hours.
 

FunkyJ

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Jul 26, 2006
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Just base the game on Role Master instead of D&D and the kids will learn all about numbers and tables...
 

LuminescentTide

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Oct 6, 2009
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Hello Ms. Coleman,
This is Marco Ginsburg. Firstly, I want to thank you again for the piece you wrote on the roleplay workshop; it's a great organization that deserves recognition.

I hate to nitpick, and it's a rather common mistake, but, as you see here, my name is spelled with a u, not an e. If you don't feel the need to change this, I suppose it doesn't actually matter in the grand scheme of things.
 

Tireseas_v1legacy

Plop plop plop
Sep 28, 2009
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Dom Camus said:
better interpersonal and work ethic skills, more responsible attitude towards their jobs

This isn't surprising, because too many jobs don't really require much skill per-se, just a willingness to tolerate mind-numbing tedium for most of your waking hours.
Interestingly enough, this is why the constant grinding of MMO's is found to be a good trainer for white collar jobs.
 

oathblade

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Aug 16, 2009
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What I disagree with is that this is new. D&D helped me build skills in high school, and it helped with the pressures there. It sounds like a great program but it sounds like their amazed to discover the sky looks blue.
 

GreyWolf257

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Oct 1, 2009
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That sounds awesome! I would love a class like that at my high-school:

Class Schedule:
1st Period: Web Design
2nd Period: Cooking Class
3rd Period: D&D SUPER-ASS FUN TIME!!!!!
4th Period: JROTC