5 Faster-Than-Light Travel Methods and Their Plausibility

Rhykker

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5 Faster-Than-Light Travel Methods and Their Plausibility

A look at some common sci-fi takes on FTL travel and how plausible they are based on the science behind them.

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Rhykker

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Actually Star Trek has all of them: warp drive (several warp technologies in fact), hyperspace, wormholes, stripstream drive and instant teleportation through vast distances, equating to FTL drive (seen at least in one episode). And time travel.

Hey, no live for Babylon 5? I don't remember how exactly it worked but navigating the hyperspace in I've Found Her game felt strangely realistic.
 

Rhykker

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Sgt. Sykes said:
Actually Star Trek has all of them: warp drive (several warp technologies in fact), hyperspace, wormholes, stripstream drive and instant teleportation through vast distances, equating to FTL drive (seen at least in one episode). And time travel.

Hey, no live for Babylon 5? I don't remember how exactly it worked but navigating the hyperspace in I've Found Her game felt strangely realistic.
I still remember the Voyager slipstream episode :)

I think Bab 5 uses jump drives to enter hyperspace.
 

Zontar

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Rhykker said:
Sgt. Sykes said:
Actually Star Trek has all of them: warp drive (several warp technologies in fact), hyperspace, wormholes, stripstream drive and instant teleportation through vast distances, equating to FTL drive (seen at least in one episode). And time travel.

Hey, no live for Babylon 5? I don't remember how exactly it worked but navigating the hyperspace in I've Found Her game felt strangely realistic.
I still remember the Voyager slipstream episode :)

I think Bab 5 uses jump drives to enter hyperspace.
Plus Stargate also has hyperspace (pretty much every faction's FTL ship), Jump Drive (Atlantic series finale) and warp (the Alteran ship in the void between galaxies). All they are missing is slipstream.
 

Rhykker

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Zontar said:
Rhykker said:
Sgt. Sykes said:
Actually Star Trek has all of them: warp drive (several warp technologies in fact), hyperspace, wormholes, stripstream drive and instant teleportation through vast distances, equating to FTL drive (seen at least in one episode). And time travel.

Hey, no live for Babylon 5? I don't remember how exactly it worked but navigating the hyperspace in I've Found Her game felt strangely realistic.
I still remember the Voyager slipstream episode :)

I think Bab 5 uses jump drives to enter hyperspace.
Plus Stargate also has hyperspace (pretty much every faction's FTL ship), Jump Drive (Atlantic series finale) and warp (the Alteran ship in the void between galaxies). All they are missing is slipstream.
Stargate SG-1 is my favorite sci-fi series. So much of it felt believable and internally consistent.
 

Zontar

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Rhykker said:
Stargate SG-1 is my favorite sci-fi series. So much of it felt believable and internally consistent.
Can't argue with that. I can't remember another show which balanced technological development using alien tech in a means which felt like something that could almost happen. Hell, the only thing I felt was really inconsistent between it and the spin-offs is the fact that the Lucian Alliance was framed as a legitimate threat when in SG-1 they where at best a nuisance distracting from a real crisis. That's the only major criticism I can think of for the whole franchise.
 

Something Amyss

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It really does thrill me to know that there's a possibly doable warp drive (or warp drive-like) concept that might happen in our future.

Granted, I like Hyperspace and wormholes even if they are space magic (though wormholes do have their proponents)

Rhykker said:
Stargate SG-1 is my favorite sci-fi series. So much of it felt believable and internally consistent.
On a similar note, I always enjoyed the Earth-built starships in the series because they specifically looked like something that one or more of our major powers would develop. Like, we didn't immediately jump to Star Trek (not that there's anything wrong with Trek).

In any case, Stargate SG-1 was freaking awesome.
 

Rhykker

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Zontar said:
Rhykker said:
Stargate SG-1 is my favorite sci-fi series. So much of it felt believable and internally consistent.
Can't argue with that. I can't remember another show which balanced technological development using alien tech in a means which felt like something that could almost happen. Hell, the only thing I felt was really inconsistent between it and the spin-offs is the fact that the Lucian Alliance was framed as a legitimate threat when in SG-1 they where at best a nuisance distracting from a real crisis. That's the only major criticism I can think of for the whole franchise.
I didn't jump on board the Atlantis train -- it was too far-future for me. What I loved about SG1 was that it was grounded in real-world, modern military tech. I did return to the franchise for Universe, though, and quite enjoyed what it tried to do. It had its faults, for sure, but by Season 2 they improved it a great deal.
 

Rhykker

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Zachary Amaranth said:
It really does thrill me to know that there's a possibly doable warp drive (or warp drive-like) concept that might happen in our future.

Granted, I like Hyperspace and wormholes even if they are space magic (though wormholes do have their proponents)

Rhykker said:
Stargate SG-1 is my favorite sci-fi series. So much of it felt believable and internally consistent.
On a similar note, I always enjoyed the Earth-built starships in the series because they specifically looked like something that one or more of our major powers would develop. Like, we didn't immediately jump to Star Trek (not that there's anything wrong with Trek).

In any case, Stargate SG-1 was freaking awesome.
Bingo. What appealed to me so much about SG1 over Star Trek was that I felt like I could relate to it so much more. I was a fan of Trek too, of course, but SG1 resonated with me more.
 

Zontar

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Rhykker said:
I didn't jump on board the Atlantis train -- it was too far-future for me. What I loved about SG1 was that it was grounded in real-world, modern military tech. I did return to the franchise for Universe, though, and quite enjoyed what it tried to do. It had its faults, for sure, but by Season 2 they improved it a great deal.
I guess it's personal preference (it's no secret Atlantis was never as popular as SG1). I felt the technology being used by that point made sense given how when it started it was already season 8 for SG1 where real weapons where being replaced by the modified P90 and Zats, and by the end of season 2/start of season 3 of the show the Asgardians gave humanity all of their knowledge.

Completely agree with you on Universe though, and I'm pretty upset how Sy Fy screwed the show over.
 

direkiller

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Rhykker said:
Sgt. Sykes said:
Actually Star Trek has all of them: warp drive (several warp technologies in fact), hyperspace, wormholes, stripstream drive and instant teleportation through vast distances, equating to FTL drive (seen at least in one episode). And time travel.

Hey, no live for Babylon 5? I don't remember how exactly it worked but navigating the hyperspace in I've Found Her game felt strangely realistic.
I think Bab 5 uses jump drives to enter hyperspace.
They used gates for smaller ships, and larger ships have jump drives.
The shadows can make wormholes in hyperspace, and the Vorlon use warp tech in hyperspace. First Ones have to be all fancy and stuff.
 
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Sgt. Sykes said:
Hey, no love for Babylon 5?
I will [i/]always[/i] have love for Babylon 5.

OT:
Very cool as always.

I hope through the miracles of increasing medical science I can live long enough to at least see a working prototype.
 

Rhykker

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Zontar said:
Rhykker said:
I didn't jump on board the Atlantis train -- it was too far-future for me. What I loved about SG1 was that it was grounded in real-world, modern military tech. I did return to the franchise for Universe, though, and quite enjoyed what it tried to do. It had its faults, for sure, but by Season 2 they improved it a great deal.
I guess it's personal preference (it's no secret Atlantis was never as popular as SG1). I felt the technology being used by that point made sense given how when it started it was already season 8 for SG1 where real weapons where being replaced by the modified P90 and Zats, and by the end of season 2/start of season 3 of the show the Asgardians gave humanity all of their knowledge.

Completely agree with you on Universe though, and I'm pretty upset how Sy Fy screwed the show over.
Oh, I completely agree that the tech made sense. And overall, I appreciate the journey taken in SG1, as more and more alien tech is adopted over the years and humans eventually get more advanced ships, etc. But even the last couple years of SG1 started to lose me when the humans were getting ahold of increasingly advanced tech.
 

Rhykker

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The question to me has ALWAYS been a "if." Like, "if" we can possibly build a machine that can safely transport someone lightyears away in a reasonable amount of time and "if" it is practical. One of the biggest obstacles is relativity. Sure, someone might make it to planet X in their lifetime, but what if it is like thousands of years in the future when they get there?
 

008Zulu_v1legacy

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To my way of thinking, Battlsestar Galactica's 'Jump Drive' was more like folding space rather than teleportation.
 

iblis666

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warp theory is all well and good but until we produce a "warp bubble" in the lab creating a ship is a bit beyond us
 

Bke

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I do so hope that we can actually get 'round to space travel at reasonable speeds... pity a lot of this is currently impossible for us.

The wormhole for instance would theoretically require us tethering a black-hole and an as yet unproven "white-hole". The obvious problem is how the hell do we do something like that, the energy required to maintain a black hole large enough and then manipulate it would be tremendous, assuming that we can though to reach a point at which you could enter the center of black hole you'd have to exceed the speed of light, which is impossible with normal relativistic physics. Thus you'll never get to the point at which you'd go /through/ the worm hole, you'd forever be stuck entering it. Of course some theories propose expanding one of the wormholes in the quantum foam, but again the issue is how?

The warp drive also has some faults, most notably Sergi Krasnikov pointed out that you become causally disconnected from the space outside the bubble. So you cant turn the damn thing off and effectively enter your own pocket universe from which you cant really escape.

The solution everyone proposed was to have negative energy, which is where manipulation of the Higgs particle comes in. using this you can make small wormholes big and through clever manipulation make a warp drive functional by creating a sort of negative energy drag. However even a wormhole 1 meter in size would require the yearly energy output of 10 billion of our suns. Warp drives applied to a spaceship of normal sci-fi proportions would need 4*10^79 J which is shitloads more energy than the mass energy of the entire known universe (like 10 billion times... again). This makes me very sad indeed.

Incidentally I think a type of warp drive was used in the mass effect series. The mass relays created these warp corridors etc?

*Edit*

Don't get me wrong, I really really wanna get this stuff going, and I don't wanna throw a bucket of water on the issue I'm just pointing out some of the issues stopping me from hitting on those alien hotties... I'll do some research and see if theres something we can do by some other contrivance and maybe restore hope
 

Vivi22

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Bke said:
Warp drives applied to a spaceship of normal sci-fi proportions would need 4*10^79 J which is shitloads more energy than the mass energy of the entire known universe (like 10 billion times... again). This makes me very sad indeed.
Pretty sure they determined that if you could manipulate the warp bubble in a certain way (a way that they would be able to if the warp bubble is possible to begin with I believe), that they would need orders of magnitude less power. An amount that might actually be feasible someday in fact.
 

fenrizz

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Although it might not be very realistic, the FTL drive (Jump drive)from Battlestar Galactica felt very natural and realistic to me when I watched the show.

Certainly seemed a lot more plausible than the warp drive from Star Trek, for some reason.