Funny Events of the "Woke" world

Silvanus

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Hospitals haven't had to do anything MORE for any new covid variant.
More than... the first wave, you mean? So you only consider something as a "significant" pressure if its larger than the previous /greatest/ pressure?

Fucking lol.

You don't even have to wear gloves when going into sterile/clean places like surgery (just bunny suit, shoe covers, and hair net). Why would you have to wear gloves when taking someone's laptop they are returning to IT and getting a new laptop? You do realize much safety stuff is just theater that doesn't do anything, right? Like the TSA.
I don't trust you in the slightest to identify the situations in which hygiene precautions are necessary or not, because you have abominable judgement and a total disregard for anything that might slightly inconvenience you.

I don't believe you should be working in a hospital without significant retraining, and I'd be genuinely worried if I was receiving care in a hospital where I observed employees acting as you do.
 

Baffle

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But it's not like earphones/headphones was something I never had bought before or wouldn't buy again, and then BAM the Raycon ads softened me up.
I am glad we have clarified that advertising works and you are indeed susceptible to it, a thing you did not realise until today. I hope this information is helpful in your future endeavours.
 

Asita

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I was inundated with ads from TV in the beforetime (pre-internet, pre-streaming) when you sorta had to watch ads if you were watching TV. I know what being inundated with ads is like, and thus mentioned that experience. Now, billboards are probably the legit most common ads I see and rarely see ads anymore, and thus mentioned that. Beyond telling me of a new product I didn't know about, ads don't do anything for me. If that product looks like something I'd really like to have, I'll look into it. I go about buying a product the same way regardless if I saw an ad for it (and now know of its existence) or say my video card on my computer went out. I will go and research both things the same exact way. Being inundated with that entire marketing funnel for say Mountain Dew isn't going to get me to buy Mountain Dew or any pop regardless of how much I see it. Seeing say John Wick drinking a Mountain Dew is gonna have zero effect on me wanting a Mountain Dew or any pop. The only time I actually even order a pop (outside of it being part of a mixed drink) is if I go somewhere that has unique pops like so few places have Green River pop, and I'll usually treat myself the once or twice a year as it's pretty rare going to a place that has such pops.


That's part of the conversion funnel.

This is what I mean by you evidently basing this off of a model that hasn't been used for decades and not understanding the KPIs. The conversion funnel does not proscribe inundating you with "buy now" or "let me convince you - in spite of your better judgment - that you really want this" shit. That hasn't been a respectable marketing strategy since before your parents were born. The conversion funnel is a rough approximation of the typical path of successful customer journeys from being unaware of a service to being a paying customer, and examples of tactics that can be used to help push the best leads along based on the typical concerns of each stage. It's an acknowledgment that there are a lot of different considerations in the purchase process, and therefore different tactics are needed to capture and retain the interest of prospective customers.

It is not some kind of six step plan to brainwash people into buying your product. Again: A good display campaign on Google has a mere 2% conversion rate. You dropping out of the funnel at any given point is entirely within expectations, because that's a "buckshot" tactic. Like with a shotgun, most of the pellets are going to miss, but the few that hit are worth the effort. Nor is it meant to convince you to buy something you don't care about. Marketing is the business of communication, of making sure that you are aware of a product, service, brand, or company, and understand whether or not it has a value offering that you'd be interested in.

What you describe here is moving from the awareness to the interest phase of the funnel. You became aware of the product, and then you started researching it to determine whether or not it fit your needs. Here, let me break this down for you:

Awareness: You learn about the existence of a business or product, but have yet to form an opinion on it.
Interest: You have started to research the product and business to figure out whether or not its value offering is interesting to you.
Consideration: You have determined that - based on your initial research - the product does align with your interests. You are now looking more in-depth at it and similar products to determine which - if any - of them would be the best fit for you.
Intent: You are more or less on the fence about a purchase. You want it, but you aren't convinced that now is the right time to get it, perhaps waiting for a better deal.
Evaluation: Final considerations, the "am I sure that I really want this" phase.
Purchase: You decide to go through with it and make the purchase.

The point of an ad is not to trick you into making a purchase you wouldn't otherwise consider. It is to create leads and nurture the quality ones whose interests align with the product or service's function. You don't like Mountain Dew? Then the Mountain Dew ad is not there to convince you. It's there to appeal to the people who do like Mountain Dew or who haven't tried it. You'd be in what we call - perhaps a little over-dramatically - the "hate" group: People who outright reject the idea of buying the product and are not worth pursuing as leads. You aren't a direct target for those ads, you just happen to be in the same place that those ads are. The only value they can expect from you is you talking about the product or ad with others, thereby spreading brand awareness.

Do not confuse your failure to understand the intricacies and intentions of the industry with you somehow being above its influence.
 
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Ag3ma

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I'm not really in the business of predicting flu outbreaks and don't really care personally where they come from as the flu/cold season is always the same time.
You're not in the business of getting your information from remotely reliable sources, which is more the problem.

You can say the ad worked on me or didn't, I don't really care. But it's not like earphones/headphones was something I never had bought before or wouldn't buy again, and then BAM the Raycon ads softened me up.
Do you know what would be really useful? Thinking about this sort of thing and realising that advertising does affect you BEFORE launching into a huge argument about how advertising doesn't affect you.
 

Trunkage

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OMG, body odor is literally a thing associated with attractiveness. Is it most likely extreme exaggeration that a deodorant will help you pick up chicks? Sure. But it's not something completely unrelated to the product.

If you have bad body odour, I'm not going to ask you to put on deodorant. It wouldn't do much. I'm going to ask you to have a shower with lots of soap because THAT kills bad BO. Deodorant just makes this 'clean time' last longer.

Deodorant don't do much to mask bad body odour when it's already there. At best its makes this sickly sweetish smell that is at least better than body odour but still smells terrible.

Now, body odour is a seperate thing from how a deodorant smells. The advertising on deodorant also pretends that these latter smells are attractive. They are not. You can tell really easily because otherwise a bunch of horny women would be spritzing themselves with male deodorant. And, I assume gay men.

So, yes bad BO can be unattractive. (I would have quibbles with this as, for example, picking up dates off a dance floor is regularly a thing and everyone is sweaty. They are also drunk so.... I wrote it as can instead of definite.) No, the deodorant smell is not attractive (but its not unattractive either). They deliberately overinflate the power of deodorant to sell you a product
 

Phoenixmgs

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More than... the first wave, you mean? So you only consider something as a "significant" pressure if its larger than the previous /greatest/ pressure?

Fucking lol.



I don't trust you in the slightest to identify the situations in which hygiene precautions are necessary or not, because you have abominable judgement and a total disregard for anything that might slightly inconvenience you.

I don't believe you should be working in a hospital without significant retraining, and I'd be genuinely worried if I was receiving care in a hospital where I observed employees acting as you do.
I literally been in hospitals the entire pandemic and outside of the pre-vaccine period, the hospitals haven't been under great strain from any new covid variant.

I wore gloves at my last job voluntarily because it made sense to do so there, IT doesn't require gloves to be safe. You literally don't know how I act. All you know is I didn't wear gloves to take work-from-home employee laptops, which doesn't make you any safer.



That's part of the conversion funnel.

This is what I mean by you evidently basing this off of a model that hasn't been used for decades and not understanding the KPIs. The conversion funnel does not proscribe inundating you with "buy now" or "let me convince you - in spite of your better judgment - that you really want this" shit. That hasn't been a respectable marketing strategy since before your parents were born. The conversion funnel is a rough approximation of the typical path of successful customer journeys from being unaware of a service to being a paying customer, and examples of tactics that can be used to help push the best leads along based on the typical concerns of each stage. It's an acknowledgment that there are a lot of different considerations in the purchase process, and therefore different tactics are needed to capture and retain the interest of prospective customers.

It is not some kind of six step plan to brainwash people into buying your product. Again: A good display campaign on Google has a mere 2% conversion rate. You dropping out of the funnel at any given point is entirely within expectations, because that's a "buckshot" tactic. Like with a shotgun, most of the pellets are going to miss, but the few that hit are worth the effort. Nor is it meant to convince you to buy something you don't care about. Marketing is the business of communication, of making sure that you are aware of a product, service, brand, or company, and understand whether or not it has a value offering that you'd be interested in.

What you describe here is moving from the awareness to the interest phase of the funnel. You became aware of the product, and then you started researching it to determine whether or not it fit your needs. Here, let me break this down for you:

Awareness: You learn about the existence of a business or product, but have yet to form an opinion on it.
Interest: You have started to research the product and business to figure out whether or not its value offering is interesting to you.
Consideration: You have determined that - based on your initial research - the product does align with your interests. You are now looking more in-depth at it and similar products to determine which - if any - of them would be the best fit for you.
Intent: You are more or less on the fence about a purchase. You want it, but you aren't convinced that now is the right time to get it, perhaps waiting for a better deal.
Evaluation: Final considerations, the "am I sure that I really want this" phase.
Purchase: You decide to go through with it and make the purchase.

The point of an ad is not to trick you into making a purchase you wouldn't otherwise consider. It is to create leads and nurture the quality ones whose interests align with the product or service's function. You don't like Mountain Dew? Then the Mountain Dew ad is not there to convince you. It's there to appeal to the people who do like Mountain Dew or who haven't tried it. You'd be in what we call - perhaps a little over-dramatically - the "hate" group: People who outright reject the idea of buying the product and are not worth pursuing as leads. You aren't a direct target for those ads, you just happen to be in the same place that those ads are. The only value they can expect from you is you talking about the product or ad with others, thereby spreading brand awareness.

Do not confuse your failure to understand the intricacies and intentions of the industry with you somehow being above its influence.
I'm aware of all that...

Outside of an ad informing me of a product I didn't know about, they don't do nothing for me. I don't get what the point of ads for things that are super popular like say Pepsi or McDonalds, everyone knows they exist already. What's the point of the ad when you know of said product? That's what I'm saying doesn't work on me.


You're not in the business of getting your information from remotely reliable sources, which is more the problem.



Do you know what would be really useful? Thinking about this sort of thing and realising that advertising does affect you BEFORE launching into a huge argument about how advertising doesn't affect you.
I couldn't get you to say you shouldn't mask even outside yet you're the one saying I'm getting information for unreliable sources?


If you have bad body odour, I'm not going to ask you to put on deodorant. It wouldn't do much. I'm going to ask you to have a shower with lots of soap because THAT kills bad BO. Deodorant just makes this 'clean time' last longer.

Deodorant don't do much to mask bad body odour when it's already there. At best its makes this sickly sweetish smell that is at least better than body odour but still smells terrible.

Now, body odour is a seperate thing from how a deodorant smells. The advertising on deodorant also pretends that these latter smells are attractive. They are not. You can tell really easily because otherwise a bunch of horny women would be spritzing themselves with male deodorant. And, I assume gay men.

So, yes bad BO can be unattractive. (I would have quibbles with this as, for example, picking up dates off a dance floor is regularly a thing and everyone is sweaty. They are also drunk so.... I wrote it as can instead of definite.) No, the deodorant smell is not attractive (but its not unattractive either). They deliberately overinflate the power of deodorant to sell you a product
Past research has shown that men using fragranced antiperspirants in videos were rated as more attractive by women than those in a placebo control condition. In addition to this, females gave higher ratings of masculinity than males, particularly in the fragranced condition. This provides evidence that females are more attentive to olfactory cues during partner selection.
 

Ag3ma

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I couldn't get you to say you shouldn't mask even outside yet you're the one saying I'm getting information for unreliable sources?
The fact you think anyone should not mask is indicative of how ridiculously extremist you are on the issue. If they want to wear a mask, it neither harms them nor anyone else so just STFU and let them make that choice for themselves.

I was clear that people are unlikely to receive any significant benefit against infection from masks in many outdoors activities and may as well not bother. The exceptions being where people are likely to be in close proximity to others, especially for an extended period of time. Effectively, your argument amounted to claiming that you can cough and flubber saliva directly into someone's face from 12 inches away and they'll be magically immune from catching a respiratory disease just so long as you do it outside.
 

Baffle

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The fact you think anyone should not mask is indicative of how ridiculously extremist you are on the issue. If they want to wear a mask, it neither harms them nor anyone else so just STFU and let them make that choice for themselves.
Slippery slope: today you're wearing a mask in Waitrose, tomorrow you're Leonardo Di Caprio locked in a dungeon by Louis 14.
 

TheMysteriousGX

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Outside of an ad informing me of a product I didn't know about, they don't do nothing for me. I don't get what the point of ads for things that are super popular like say Pepsi or McDonalds, everyone knows they exist already. What's the point of the ad when you know of said product? That's what I'm saying doesn't work on me.
The point of the ad is for you to say "I could go for a burger" the next time you get hungry.

Why'd you pull the trigger on those Raycons instead of any number of other, better brands?
 

Phoenixmgs

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The fact you think anyone should not mask is indicative of how ridiculously extremist you are on the issue. If they want to wear a mask, it neither harms them nor anyone else so just STFU and let them make that choice for themselves.

I was clear that people are unlikely to receive any significant benefit against infection from masks in many outdoors activities and may as well not bother. The exceptions being where people are likely to be in close proximity to others, especially for an extended period of time. Effectively, your argument amounted to claiming that you can cough and flubber saliva directly into someone's face from 12 inches away and they'll be magically immune from catching a respiratory disease just so long as you do it outside.
People literally ride bikes with masks on but not helmets. That shows how out of whack their risk analysis is. There's not a single confirmed case of covid spread in a outdoor setting. There's no data saying masks work inside either. If you're so paranoid, wear a mask outside, but that doesn't make you any less paranoid. If you're still wearing a mask outside today, when do you stop?

The point of the ad is for you to say "I could go for a burger" the next time you get hungry.

Why'd you pull the trigger on those Raycons instead of any number of other, better brands?
I bought Klipsch's earbuds...
 

Ag3ma

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People literally ride bikes with masks on but not helmets. That shows how out of whack their risk analysis is.
Yes, and some people believe the Earth is flat. So what?

There's not a single confirmed case of covid spread in a outdoor setting.
Following the same sort of logic you can also say there's no proof anyone contracted lung cancer from smoking.

There's no data saying masks work inside either.
🤦‍♂️
 

Silvanus

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I literally been in hospitals the entire pandemic and outside of the pre-vaccine period, the hospitals haven't been under great strain from any new covid variant.
You're one of the following: A) on wards/departments that aren't greatly affected, and lacking any perspective of wards/departments that are; B) In some costly private hospital that large numbers of people can't afford; C) fibbing about working in hospitals to get clout in an online argument.

I wore gloves at my last job voluntarily because it made sense to do so there, IT doesn't require gloves to be safe. You literally don't know how I act. All you know is I didn't wear gloves to take work-from-home employee laptops, which doesn't make you any safer.
I know the attitude with which you approach basic precautions. Which is enough, and is greatly concerning.
 

Asita

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I'm aware of all that...

Outside of an ad informing me of a product I didn't know about, they don't do nothing for me. I don't get what the point of ads for things that are super popular like say Pepsi or McDonalds, everyone knows they exist already. What's the point of the ad when you know of said product? That's what I'm saying doesn't work on me.
Clearly you are not - in fact - aware of that, because that statement is predicated on the same simple mistake of treating ads as some monolithic concept built around one singular purpose. "What's the point of the ad when you know of said product? That's what I'm saying doesn't work on me."

The question assumes that there is not a funnel at all, that the only purpose of ads is to be the first and only step in a process, taking people from ignorance of the product to wanting to purchase the product in one move. What you're referring to here is brand awareness, the figurative starting line for marketing. It's a goal that is only really the marketing priority when dealing with brands - usually new ones - that have yet to really penetrate the market they're being advertised in (eg, Rakuten). For more established brands with good market saturation, expanding brand awareness tends to be almost an incidental side effect of their other marketing efforts.

The funnel is a long process and ads are designed to keep prospective customers moving along it. Let's take a look at a quick Coca Cola commercial, for instance.


The point of this is not that it presumes the masses are somehow ignorant of the existence of Coca Cola and that needs to be rectified. The point of it is emotional resonance, reminding people of times when they might have been tired, busy, or overworked - to name a few possibilities - times when having a nice cold coke really hit the spot and refreshed them. That commercial isn't designed to move people into the awareness stage of the funnel. Rather, it presumes that it needs no introduction. It's designed to help nudge the people in the intent stage towards the purchase stage and their existing enthusiasts towards the (unlisted in the prior image) repurchase stage. The point is not to give them a conclusion they would never reach on their own, but to bring the idea back to the forefront of their mind so they're actively considering it again.

In a great many cases, ads communicate brand values to emphasize commonality with their audience that makes that audience more comfortable doing business with them, reinforcing the positive conclusions they arrived at in the interest and consideration stages. Hell, for that matter, a lot of the articles and ways you research a product are part of the marketing strategy.

And here's the thing: For an established brand, if you're looking at a general purpose advertisement rather than - for instance - a newsletter you opted into, then they're usually going to be be prioritizing the mid-to-late steps of the conversion funnel.

That you "don't get the point" of the ads is entirely a function of you being presumptive and functionally strawmanning them as trying to fulfill a completely different purpose and declaring that ridiculous.
 
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Cicada 5

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https://www.buzzfeednews.com/articl...acklash-velma-mindy-project-never-have-i-ever

When a young brown girl appears onscreen in one of Kaling’s shows, it’s easy enough to guess where her story is going. She will probably be a loud-mouthed nerd with strict parents and insecurities about her body hair, fixated on a white dude who is little more than rude to her. She will probably not question the rigid social hierarchy she’s inherited; in fact, she’s probably going to enact it, cruelly, on herself and others. Viewers are bored with the artistic laziness of these plotlines — both in their repetitiveness and their reliance on outdated stereotypes. It’s certainly a sign that Kaling’s comedy has gotten stale, and that her politics have fallen behind the times. But it’s also clearly a symptom of the fact that there are few Indian women of Kaling’s stature and renown making TV today. There aren’t enough other stories about young Indian girls to offset or complicate the narratives Kaling has chosen to retread again and again.

This highly justified frustration has manifested as personal vitriol directed at Kaling because it’s easier that way. “Mindy Kaling” is a perfectly packaged trending topic that people can engage with. She's a woman in comedy who has historically been criticized for her weight, her voice, and her darker skin; we've found new ways to target her, but she's still a public figure we love to hate. She’s so much like her characters that we believe their faults are her faults. The now-popular refrain, “Mindy Kaling, just because you are an Indian loser, does not mean Indians are losers!” takes the frustration with her overdone caricature and makes it seem like Kaling is portraying all Indian women as self-hating freaks. But she’s not. She’s just portraying herself, stylized as a self-hating freak, over and over again. And it’s boring. But her work is only a lightning rod for online anger because it looms so large above other Indian American media. It’s a small sliver of possible stories that’s been amplified by Kaling’s peerless fame. She ought to have more peers disrupting her monopoly, but the robust and necessary criticism of her work ought to hold more water than the gleeful revelry in her personal demise.
 

Trunkage

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Past research has shown that men using fragranced antiperspirants in videos were rated as more attractive by women than those in a placebo control condition. In addition to this, females gave higher ratings of masculinity than males, particularly in the fragranced condition. This provides evidence that females are more attentive to olfactory cues during partner selection.
Male Scent - Is It Possible That It Can Sexually Attract Women? - By Dr. Rahul Gupta | Lybrate

You don't want to mask up your personal smell too much as that is what is attractive to women.

Deodorant Changes Attractiveness Of Men And Women In Different Ways - PsyBlog (spring.org.uk)

Deodorant can make a male with less testosterone be on par with a male with more testosterone. It can't boost testosterones effect on attractiveness any higher. Also, you can get similar effects via increasing your testosterone rather than deodorant.
 

Chimpzy

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Good. Would be nice if we got some of that too, but unfortunately our royals are smart enough to be inoffensively bland and mostly keep their mouth shut.
 

Thaluikhain

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On one hand, only the UK gets a coronation to protest at, but then on the other only the UK has to pay for it. He's, for example, the King of Tuvalu without a separate coronation.

As an aside, I like how in Tuvalu he's "King of Tuvalu and of His other Realms and Territories", because in everywhere he's king of, the protocol is to recoginise that he's the kind of that place, and other unspecified places.
 

Phoenixmgs

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Yes, and some people believe the Earth is flat. So what?



Following the same sort of logic you can also say there's no proof anyone contracted lung cancer from smoking.



🤦‍♂️
The far-left are the ones riding bikes with masks on and no helmets.

It also fits basic science that respiratory viruses don't spread outside.

Yet to see a single good (real-world data and randomized) study that says masks do anything pre-covid or post-covid. You can't claim masks work without proof of them working. Proof is on the person claiming something, not on the other people to disprove it.


You're one of the following: A) on wards/departments that aren't greatly affected, and lacking any perspective of wards/departments that are; B) In some costly private hospital that large numbers of people can't afford; C) fibbing about working in hospitals to get clout in an online argument.



I know the attitude with which you approach basic precautions. Which is enough, and is greatly concerning.
I work IT, we go to every department. We were installing badge readers (so nurses/doctors can sign into PCs with their badges) during that pandemic that had to go in every single patient room and nurse station in every department. Our normal projects are refreshing old computers, which are in every single department as well. Nope, not in some costly private hospital.

Funny how my actual results for anything safety related is top tier. You can't even explain how wearing gloves will slow covid spread in any way. I don't do things that don't make sense to do.


Clearly you are not - in fact - aware of that, because that statement is predicated on the same simple mistake of treating ads as some monolithic concept built around one singular purpose. "What's the point of the ad when you know of said product? That's what I'm saying doesn't work on me."

The question assumes that there is not a funnel at all, that the only purpose of ads is to be the first and only step in a process, taking people from ignorance of the product to wanting to purchase the product in one move. What you're referring to here is brand awareness, the figurative starting line for marketing. It's a goal that is only really the marketing priority when dealing with brands - usually new ones - that have yet to really penetrate the market they're being advertised in (eg, Rakuten). For more established brands with good market saturation, expanding brand awareness tends to be almost an incidental side effect of their other marketing efforts.

The funnel is a long process and ads are designed to keep prospective customers moving along it. Let's take a look at a quick Coca Cola commercial, for instance.


The point of this is not that it presumes the masses are somehow ignorant of the existence of Coca Cola and that needs to be rectified. The point of it is emotional resonance, reminding people of times when they might have been tired, busy, or overworked - to name a few possibilities - times when having a nice cold coke really hit the spot and refreshed them. That commercial isn't designed to move people into the awareness stage of the funnel. Rather, it presumes that it needs no introduction. It's designed to help nudge the people in the intent stage towards the purchase stage and their existing enthusiasts towards the (unlisted in the prior image) repurchase stage. The point is not to give them a conclusion they would never reach on their own, but to bring the idea back to the forefront of their mind so they're actively considering it again.

In a great many cases, ads communicate brand values to emphasize commonality with their audience that makes that audience more comfortable doing business with them, reinforcing the positive conclusions they arrived at in the interest and consideration stages. Hell, for that matter, a lot of the articles and ways you research a product are part of the marketing strategy.

And here's the thing: For an established brand, if you're looking at a general purpose advertisement rather than - for instance - a newsletter you opted into, then they're usually going to be be prioritizing the mid-to-late steps of the conversion funnel.

That you "don't get the point" of the ads is entirely a function of you being presumptive and functionally strawmanning them as trying to fulfill a completely different purpose and declaring that ridiculous.
I basically do the entire funnel when I first know of the product or need a product. Like I said, none of that stuff afterward does anything for me. I'm not going to get a Coke because of some emotional Xmas commercial or because a character I like from a movie is drinking it. Any brand loyalty I have is from my personal past experiences with the brand. I recall as a kid getting like all these 13 or so lego sets from McDonalds that would combine into singular big ship or something and that was pretty awesome, but I'm an adult and know McDonalds is garbage food so I don't go there. When there were standalone MP3 players, my brand of choice was Cowon (and still is for software as jetaudio is the best sounding music player by a long shot) and I never saw an ad for them because they're a Korean company.

Male Scent - Is It Possible That It Can Sexually Attract Women? - By Dr. Rahul Gupta | Lybrate

You don't want to mask up your personal smell too much as that is what is attractive to women.

Deodorant Changes Attractiveness Of Men And Women In Different Ways - PsyBlog (spring.org.uk)

Deodorant can make a male with less testosterone be on par with a male with more testosterone. It can't boost testosterones effect on attractiveness any higher. Also, you can get similar effects via increasing your testosterone rather than deodorant.
And...? How is a deodorant ad about attracting chicks not pertain to the product? Why does anyone wear any kind of fragrance (deodorant, cologne, perfume) then? People would just wear stuff they really like the smell of then. M&Ms literally have nothing to do with women empowerment.
 

Asita

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I basically do the entire funnel when I first know of the product or need a product. Like I said, none of that stuff afterward does anything for me. I'm not going to get a Coke because of some emotional Xmas commercial or because a character I like from a movie is drinking it. Any brand loyalty I have is from my personal past experiences with the brand. I recall as a kid getting like all these 13 or so lego sets from McDonalds that would combine into singular big ship or something and that was pretty awesome, but I'm an adult and know McDonalds is garbage food so I don't go there. When there were standalone MP3 players, my brand of choice was Cowon (and still is for software as jetaudio is the best sounding music player by a long shot) and I never saw an ad for them because they're a Korean company.


And again, you demonstrate that you don't have the slightest clue what you're talking about and are still strawmanning the marketing industry as trying to trick you into making impulse buys that you wouldn't otherwise consider. Seriously Phoenix, speaking as an actual professional in this field, just stop, because your self-assured ignorance is so frustrating as to almost be painful.
 
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Buyetyen

Elite Member
May 11, 2020
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I basically do the entire funnel when I first know of the product or need a product. Like I said, none of that stuff afterward does anything for me. I'm not going to get a Coke because of some emotional Xmas commercial or because a character I like from a movie is drinking it. Any brand loyalty I have is from my personal past experiences with the brand. I recall as a kid getting like all these 13 or so lego sets from McDonalds that would combine into singular big ship or something and that was pretty awesome, but I'm an adult and know McDonalds is garbage food so I don't go there. When there were standalone MP3 players, my brand of choice was Cowon (and still is for software as jetaudio is the best sounding music player by a long shot) and I never saw an ad for them because they're a Korean company.
Just putting this out there, but my personal experience has been that the people who boast the loudest about how they're impossible to influence, manipulate or fool are in fact the easiest targets specifically because they think they're bulletproof.
 
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