New York Hospital to Pause Delivering Babies After Unvaccinated Workers Resign En Masse

Dirty Hipsters

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Why are sumo wrestlers healthy and those that drink pop daily are unhealthy?
They aren't.

Sumo wrestlers, on average, have a lifespan that is 20 years shorter than the average for japanese males.
 
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Cheetodust

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Every calorie is far far from being equal. The calories that cause inflammation are bad and those that do not are good. Why are sumo wrestlers healthy and those that drink pop daily are unhealthy?
Put those goal posts back. Talking purely about the mechanics of becoming obese. Which is purely down to caloric intake.
 

Agema

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I'm not disputing that it is a recognised phenomenon. However, precisely how much of a problem it is is not clear.

Oxidation of chemicals is through reaction with reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl, superoxide and peroxynitrite radicals, hydrogen peroxide, etc. High production of these reactive species is called "oxidative stress". LDL can react with sugar, but usually because the LDL or glucose has been attacked by one of these reactive species in the first place. We also know that oxidative stress can also increase insulin resistance, so the correlation of higher glucose and oxidised LDL might share a similar cause rather than one causing the other. Persistent hyperglycaemia is likely to be a problem, because excessive blood glucose damages cells and so causes inflammation and inflammation involves production of reactive oxygen species - but how significant is this outside diabetes?

The factors affecting production of reactive species and so oxidative stress are... considerable. Inflammation (as above), adipose tissue contributes, antioxidant levels, and it can tie into all sorts of metabolic issues, both general and fat-specific (e.g. apolipoprotein). Genetics and expression of many proteins is likely to contribute significantly between individuals.

One thing I would suggest is that if you've got more fat swilling around your body, very likely it's going to increase the amount of oxidised fat as well, if for no other reason than basic principle that the rate of reaction is dependent on concentration.
 

Silvanus

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I just explained the internal body processes of why LDL becomes bad and you just ignore it. Go look up experts in nutrition field that actually know how your body breaks down things and how it affects the rest of the body. Heart disease is caused by inflammation, and that's what sugar causes. If you have to choose between eating something that has saturated fat vs something with sugar, the saturated fat is far far healthier; bacon is better than a donut or can of pop. The pop from McDonalds is killing you so many times more than the burger. There's nothing wrong with saturated fats, too much of anything is bad (even water).
I ignored the part about LDL because it was largely irrelevant.

The fact is, you're telling me to look up what nutritionists are saying, but nutritionists unanimously agree saturated fat is a major cause of heart disease. This isn't arguable stuff. It's basic, established dietary science.

Every calorie is far far from being equal. The calories that cause inflammation are bad and those that do not are good. Why are sumo wrestlers healthy and those that drink pop daily are unhealthy?
You know why? Because regular, intense exercise prevents the build up of visceral fat.
 

Kwak

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I noticed you failed to respond to the science of fully vaccinating those previously infected is basically pointless and greatly likelihood for causing harm, especially on the 2nd dose in younger people via the myocarditis issue.
Meh.

"This report details the findings of a case-control evaluation of the association between vaccination and SARS-CoV-2 reinfection in Kentucky during May–June 2021 among persons previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 in 2020. Kentucky residents who were not vaccinated had 2.34 times the odds of reinfection compared with those who were fully vaccinated (odds ratio [OR] = 2.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.58–3.47). These findings suggest that among persons with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, full vaccination provides additional protection against reinfection. To reduce their risk of infection, all eligible persons should be offered vaccination, even if they have been previously infected with SARS-CoV-2."

and greatly likelihood for causing harm, especially on the 2nd dose in younger people via the myocarditis issue.
"During the process of open peer review on medRxiv we quickly received a number of messages from reviewers concerned that there was a problem with our reported incidence of myocarditis post mRNA vaccination. Our reported incidence appeared vastly inflated by an incorrectly small denominator (ie number of doses administered over the time period of the study). We reviewed the data available at Open Ottawa and found that there had indeed been a major underestimation, with the actual number of administered doses being more than 800,000 (much higher than quoted in the paper). In order to avoid misleading either colleagues or the general public and press, we the authors unanimously wish to withdraw this paper on the grounds of incorrect incidence data."
 

Phoenixmgs

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They aren't.

Sumo wrestlers, on average, have a lifespan that is 20 years shorter than the average for japanese males.
And the reason sumo wrestlers live shorter lives is because of their diet alone? NFL players have shorter lifespans and they're in-shape and healthy.



Put those goal posts back. Talking purely about the mechanics of becoming obese. Which is purely down to caloric intake.
I'm just talking about general health. 2 people say 20 pounds overweight can be very differently healthy because of their diets. A majority of people in India that have diabetes are skinny.


I'm not disputing that it is a recognised phenomenon. However, precisely how much of a problem it is is not clear.

Oxidation of chemicals is through reaction with reactive oxygen species such as hydroxyl, superoxide and peroxynitrite radicals, hydrogen peroxide, etc. High production of these reactive species is called "oxidative stress". LDL can react with sugar, but usually because the LDL or glucose has been attacked by one of these reactive species in the first place. We also know that oxidative stress can also increase insulin resistance, so the correlation of higher glucose and oxidised LDL might share a similar cause rather than one causing the other. Persistent hyperglycaemia is likely to be a problem, because excessive blood glucose damages cells and so causes inflammation and inflammation involves production of reactive oxygen species - but how significant is this outside diabetes?

The factors affecting production of reactive species and so oxidative stress are... considerable. Inflammation (as above), adipose tissue contributes, antioxidant levels, and it can tie into all sorts of metabolic issues, both general and fat-specific (e.g. apolipoprotein). Genetics and expression of many proteins is likely to contribute significantly between individuals.

One thing I would suggest is that if you've got more fat swilling around your body, very likely it's going to increase the amount of oxidised fat as well, if for no other reason than basic principle that the rate of reaction is dependent on concentration.
A higher percentage of calories from added sugar is associated with significantly increased risk of CVD mortality. In addition, regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with elevated CVD mortality.

I ignored the part about LDL because it was largely irrelevant.

The fact is, you're telling me to look up what nutritionists are saying, but nutritionists unanimously agree saturated fat is a major cause of heart disease. This isn't arguable stuff. It's basic, established dietary science.
I said to look up nutritionists that can explain how your body breaks down things and how they affect other body functions. Somebody that actually reads into how fat and sugar are broken down and can explain that to you vs somebody that just reads the general studies on something are two very different people like an IT guy that knows how to fix stuff (like me) vs an IT guy that knows what's happening on the code level. My uncle's heart specialist for example told him that he could not lower blockage in his arteries yet my uncle did that very thing even though the specialist said it wasn't possible. And no, nutritionists don't unanimously agree that saturated fat is the main cause of heart disease, there's literally books out there written by very accomplished doctors saying sugar is the cause, but in your world, it's UNANIMOUS agreement!!!


Meh.

"This report details the findings of a case-control evaluation of the association between vaccination and SARS-CoV-2 reinfection in Kentucky during May–June 2021 among persons previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 in 2020. Kentucky residents who were not vaccinated had 2.34 times the odds of reinfection compared with those who were fully vaccinated (odds ratio [OR] = 2.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.58–3.47). These findings suggest that among persons with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, full vaccination provides additional protection against reinfection. To reduce their risk of infection, all eligible persons should be offered vaccination, even if they have been previously infected with SARS-CoV-2."


"During the process of open peer review on medRxiv we quickly received a number of messages from reviewers concerned that there was a problem with our reported incidence of myocarditis post mRNA vaccination. Our reported incidence appeared vastly inflated by an incorrectly small denominator (ie number of doses administered over the time period of the study). We reviewed the data available at Open Ottawa and found that there had indeed been a major underestimation, with the actual number of administered doses being more than 800,000 (much higher than quoted in the paper). In order to avoid misleading either colleagues or the general public and press, we the authors unanimously wish to withdraw this paper on the grounds of incorrect incidence data."
So you're posting the Kansas study that goes against literally every other study that's been done on immunity? Guess what? If one 1 study out of 10 says one thing and the other 9 say the other, that 1 is probably wrong. There's tons of flaws in that Kansas study as well like the CDC was telling vaccinated people not to get tested so less vaccinated people were getting tested obviously.

What does it matter that some Canadian math was wrong? The risk of myocarditis is not only coming from this Canadian data. There's the Israel data for myocarditis that primarily used Pfizer vaccines. Why would Sweden, Norway, and Finland suspend use of Moderna vaccine in young people based on known wrong data? The vaccine trials for kids under 12 used a third of a dose for example vs the adult dose. So you give the full dose to a 12-year-old and a third of a dose to an 11-year-old? That doesn't make sense. Kids are already at such low risks for covid, why do they need to be FULLY vaccinated anyway? If one dose is showing far fewer side effects, give them one dose then. It's common sense stuff. Unvaccinated kids are at lower risk to covid than fully vaccinated adults already. If you just vaccinated at-risk kids, you're cutting out just about all covid deaths in children right there. The flu kills more kids per year than covid and we don't force flu vaccines on them.
 

Agema

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A higher percentage of calories from added sugar is associated with significantly increased risk of CVD mortality. In addition, regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with elevated CVD mortality.
Yes, this is well known. But the question is, does large quantities of sugar caused oxidised LDL, or to what extent? The answer to this is not clear.

I said to look up nutritionists that can explain how your body breaks down things and how they affect other body functions. Somebody that actually reads into how fat and sugar are broken down and can explain that to you vs somebody that just reads the general studies on something are two very different people like an IT guy that knows how to fix stuff (like me) vs an IT guy that knows what's happening on the code level. My uncle's heart specialist for example told him that he could not lower blockage in his arteries yet my uncle did that very thing even though the specialist said it wasn't possible. And no, nutritionists don't unanimously agree that saturated fat is the main cause of heart disease, there's literally books out there written by very accomplished doctors saying sugar is the cause, but in your world, it's UNANIMOUS agreement!!!
He didn't say saturated fats were the main cause of heart disease, he said they were a major cause of heart disease. This is not a particularly controversial statement: although more recently it is believed the dangers of saturated fats have been historically exaggerated, overall the evidence strongly suggests they are still a significant risk.
 

TheMysteriousGX

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And the reason sumo wrestlers live shorter lives is because of their diet alone? NFL players have shorter lifespans and they're in-shape and healthy.
They really aren't. Especially the players dragging that average down like the linemen. They're certain definitions of "fit", but healthy that is not.
 
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Dirty Hipsters

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And the reason sumo wrestlers live shorter lives is because of their diet alone? NFL players have shorter lifespans and they're in-shape and healthy.

No they aren't. They're large and strong, but that doesn't mean that they are healthy. Quarterbacks, running backs, kickers, etc are in-shape and healthy but linemen definitely aren't. You don't need to be healthy when your job is to be an immovable obstacle.


In conclusion, the higher rate of mortality in sumo wrestlers seems to be due to the markedly higher rate of mortality from 35 to 74 years old. In sumo wrestlers, also, this study provides evidence that the higher overweight groups have substantially higher risks for mortality.
 
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Silvanus

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I said to look up nutritionists that can explain how your body breaks down things and how they affect other body functions. Somebody that actually reads into how fat and sugar are broken down and can explain that to you vs somebody that just reads the general studies on something are two very different people like an IT guy that knows how to fix stuff (like me) vs an IT guy that knows what's happening on the code level. My uncle's heart specialist for example told him that he could not lower blockage in his arteries yet my uncle did that very thing even though the specialist said it wasn't possible. And no, nutritionists don't unanimously agree that saturated fat is the main cause of heart disease, there's literally books out there written by very accomplished doctors saying sugar is the cause, but in your world, it's UNANIMOUS agreement!!!
You don't need a nutritionist to explain basic biological functions to you. This kind of thing is covered in A-Levels.

I didn't say "the main cause". On that, there's likely to be disagreement. I said "a major cause", which-- yes-- is pretty unanimously agreed.
 
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Agema

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No they aren't. They're large and strong, but that doesn't mean that they are healthy. Quarterbacks, running backs, kickers, etc are in-shape and healthy but linemen definitely aren't. You don't need to be healthy when your job is to be an immovable obstacle.
I think, and I'm not entirely sure on this, that it's believed that high levels of activity can normally restrain (or heavily slow down) the damage to the cardiovascular system from being very overweight. However, at the point high activity stops - i.e. retirement for a pro sportsperson - things can start going downhill pretty rapidly.
 

Dirty Hipsters

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I said to look up nutritionists that can explain how your body breaks down things and how they affect other body functions. Somebody that actually reads into how fat and sugar are broken down and can explain that to you vs somebody that just reads the general studies on something are two very different people like an IT guy that knows how to fix stuff (like me) vs an IT guy that knows what's happening on the code level. My uncle's heart specialist for example told him that he could not lower blockage in his arteries yet my uncle did that very thing even though the specialist said it wasn't possible. And no, nutritionists don't unanimously agree that saturated fat is the main cause of heart disease, there's literally books out there written by very accomplished doctors saying sugar is the cause, but in your world, it's UNANIMOUS agreement!!!
I would like to point out that "nutritionists" are bullshit. Nutritionist isn't a protected term, anyone can claim to be a nutritionist with absolutely no education or understanding of how the body works. I could legally claim to be a nutritionist and tell you that you are wrong. If you want to make sure your information is accurate you should be reading the work of dietitians, not nutritionists. "Dietitian" is a legally protected term and the only people who can legally claim to be dietitians are licensed medical doctors who specialize in nutritional assessments and intervention. Dietitians are the only regulated healthcare professionals licensed to assess, diagnose, and treat such problems.
 

Agema

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I would like to point out that "nutritionists" are bullshit. Nutritionist isn't a protected term, anyone can claim to be a nutritionist with absolutely no education or understanding of how the body works. I could legally claim to be a nutritionist and tell you that you are wrong. If you want to make sure your information is accurate you should be reading the work of dietitians, not nutritionists. "Dietitian" is a legally protected term and the only people who can legally claim to be dietitians are licensed medical doctors who specialize in nutritional assessments and intervention. Dietitians are the only regulated healthcare professionals licensed to assess, diagnose, and treat such problems.
It's even worse than that. In my view, nutritional science has generated some of the worst scientific output in biological and medical sciences over the last few decades, not least because it's polluted by a godawful mass of wellness bullshit. I feel very sorry for the rigorous ones to share their field with so much garbage.
 

Kwak

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Guess what? If one 1 study out of 10 says one thing and the other 9 say the other, that 1 is probably wrong.
What are the other 9 studies?
Why is the advice you're following superior to the CDC's?


ETA.


Now, a new NIH-supported study shows that the answer to this question will vary based on how an individual’s antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were generated: over the course of a naturally acquired infection or from a COVID-19 vaccine. The new evidence shows that protective antibodies generated in response to an mRNA vaccine will target a broader range of SARS-CoV-2 variants carrying “single letter” changes in a key portion of their spike protein compared to antibodies acquired from an infection.

These results add to evidence that people with acquired immunity may have differing levels of protection to emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. More importantly, the data provide further documentation that those who’ve had and recovered from a COVID-19 infection still stand to benefit from getting vaccinated.

 
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Agema

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What are the other 9 studies?
Yes, but why would you want to read the other nine when the one you've got tells you what you want to believe? Case closed!

Why is the advice you're following superior to the CDC's?
Because anyone can watch a few YouTube vids and know better than the CDC, obviously.
 

Phoenixmgs

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Yes, this is well known. But the question is, does large quantities of sugar caused oxidised LDL, or to what extent? The answer to this is not clear.

He didn't say saturated fats were the main cause of heart disease, he said they were a major cause of heart disease. This is not a particularly controversial statement: although more recently it is believed the dangers of saturated fats have been historically exaggerated, overall the evidence strongly suggests they are still a significant risk.
I know it's not completely known yet but the arguments for sugar being the main cause are far more compelling than fats. We already know sugars are really bad for you anyway outside of possibly being the major link to heart disease. That's already enough of a reason for me. It's why I don't eat/drink much sugar since I gave up pop about 20 years ago.

Also, the following paper is the first thing that came up when searching "risk of heart disease saturated fats sugar". I don't purposefully lead searches to find what I want to read. You can google that and find the following link is indeed the first result.

Although some saturated fats may affect some lipid fractions in ways that could theoretically increase the risk of CHD, a large Swedish population study found no association between fat intake (of any type) and CHD. A review of cohort and case-control studies likewise did not demonstrate a clear role of saturated fats in CHD. Moreover, meta-analyses show that there is limited and inconclusive evidence for modification of total or saturated fat on CHD, or CV morbidity or mortality.

They really aren't. Especially the players dragging that average down like the linemen. They're certain definitions of "fit", but healthy that is not.
No they aren't. They're large and strong, but that doesn't mean that they are healthy. Quarterbacks, running backs, kickers, etc are in-shape and healthy but linemen definitely aren't. You don't need to be healthy when your job is to be an immovable obstacle.

Um, gonna have to go with "What is head trauma?" Alex.
I meant the other football players outside of linemen as they are kinda like sumo wrestlers in a sense as they have to be big and stay big. To Dirty, that's basically what the article I posted said as sumo wrestlers tend to keep the same/similar diet after wrestling, which is bad when you're obviously not nearly as active. The point is that sumo wrestlers in their primes don't have any unhealthy markers. To Mumbler, that's my point as there's variables; sumo wrestlers really push their bodies to the limit when they are actively wrestling much like football players. Thus, having a lifestyle like that for so long in your life (basically burning too bright) could very well result in it lowering your life expectancy regardless of how healthy you are.
 

Phoenixmgs

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You don't need a nutritionist to explain basic biological functions to you. This kind of thing is covered in A-Levels.

I didn't say "the main cause". On that, there's likely to be disagreement. I said "a major cause", which-- yes-- is pretty unanimously agreed.
I didn't mean basic biological functions, I meant very detailed and specific functions. Like on the molecular how your body breaks down sugar or fat, and then where it goes and how it affects every part of your body. Like my uncle could (as he's old now with mental issues) off the top of his head tell you the difference of how your body broke down sugar vs HFCS. Find people with that kinda of knowledge vs those that just read studies. Much like how someone that codes in IT has way more knowledge of what's actually going on than a normal IT guy.

Yep, not unanimous at all.
Although some saturated fats may affect some lipid fractions in ways that could theoretically increase the risk of CHD, a large Swedish population study found no association between fat intake (of any type) and CHD. A review of cohort and case-control studies likewise did not demonstrate a clear role of saturated fats in CHD. Moreover, meta-analyses show that there is limited and inconclusive evidence for modification of total or saturated fat on CHD, or CV morbidity or mortality.

I would like to point out that "nutritionists" are bullshit. Nutritionist isn't a protected term, anyone can claim to be a nutritionist with absolutely no education or understanding of how the body works. I could legally claim to be a nutritionist and tell you that you are wrong. If you want to make sure your information is accurate you should be reading the work of dietitians, not nutritionists. "Dietitian" is a legally protected term and the only people who can legally claim to be dietitians are licensed medical doctors who specialize in nutritional assessments and intervention. Dietitians are the only regulated healthcare professionals licensed to assess, diagnose, and treat such problems.
That's why I said the people that actually know whats going on on the molecular level and amino acids. There's a difference between someone that can tell you something is bad or good and the person that can tell you why in great detail, the later is what I'm talking about.


I will reply, I ran out of time, gotta go out to the local watering hole, Friday night and all.


Yes, but why would you want to read the other nine when the one you've got tells you what you want to believe? Case closed!



Because anyone can watch a few YouTube vids and know better than the CDC, obviously.
Really, you can't see why the Kansas studied is flawed?
 

Agema

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Really, you can't see why the Kansas studied is flawed?
I think what's flawed is doing a Google search on science and thinking the first paper to show up tells you the answer.
 

Phoenixmgs

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What are the other 9 studies?
Why is the advice you're following superior to the CDC's?


ETA.


Now, a new NIH-supported study shows that the answer to this question will vary based on how an individual’s antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were generated: over the course of a naturally acquired infection or from a COVID-19 vaccine. The new evidence shows that protective antibodies generated in response to an mRNA vaccine will target a broader range of SARS-CoV-2 variants carrying “single letter” changes in a key portion of their spike protein compared to antibodies acquired from an infection.

These results add to evidence that people with acquired immunity may have differing levels of protection to emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. More importantly, the data provide further documentation that those who’ve had and recovered from a COVID-19 infection still stand to benefit from getting vaccinated.

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.08.24.21262415v1 (Israel data)


I think what's flawed is doing a Google search on science and thinking the first paper to show up tells you the answer.
Posted up above. What you're complaining about me doing (which I'm not) is literally the same thing the CDC did. The CDC just posted the one study that fits their narrative and nothing else.