Discuss and Rate the Last Film You Watched

Is this the first poll?


  • Total voters
    45

Old_Hunter_77

Elite Member
Dec 29, 2021
1,745
1,585
118
Country
United States
The Sound of 007

It's a pretty breezy overview of 60 years of Bond scores, Bond songs and of course the Bond theme. I guess you're not gonna do that much history justice in 89 minutes. But even so, the documentary spends way too much time on Billie Eillish and her brother - like 30% of the overall running time is dedicated to No Time to Die - while barely acknowledging A-ha, Chris Cornell, Bill Conti, Sheryl Crow or Madonna. An overlong anecdote about Amy Winehouse being batshit in Barbara Broccoli's office is also somehow worthier of the time.

Anyway, favorite themes in chronological order:

  • Goldfinger (Shirley Bassey)
  • Thunderball (Tom fucking Jones)
  • Diamonds are Forever (Shirley Bassey)
  • Live and Let Die (Paul McCartney; hate the reggae break in the middle though)
  • Nobody Does it Better (Carly Simon, from The Spy Who Loved Me)
  • For Your Eyes Only (Sheena Easton)
  • A View to a Kill (Duran Duran, baby)
  • GoldenEye (Tina Turner)
  • The World is Not Enough (Garbage)
  • Spectre (Radiohead, unused theme song)
As a 90's teen, I protest this sidelining of Chris Cornell. Coincidentally, counterpoint, I recently re-watched:

Singles

This movie from 1992 by Cameron Crowe, starring Bridget Fonda, Kyra Sedwyck, and Scott Campbell also includes Matt Dillon, BIll Pulman, Chris Cornell, Alice In Chains, and the soon-to-be members of Pearl Jam.

Technically this is a romantic comedy but really it's a tour guide of the Seatle youth scene of the time and, like any movie, was frankly already too late but it cemented the imagery of what the media and future generations would call "grunge." This movie is like Saturday Night Fever or the Woodstock documentary- it's less about what's actually happening and more about the vibes and to capture a specific cultural moment in time.

Matt Dillon plays a singer in a rock band whose members are played by Jeff Ament and Stone Gossard as cameos- these were founding members of Mother Love Bone (you can see graffiti of that in the film) whose singer Andrew Wood died. They would soon hook up with Eddie Vedder during both a tribute project Temple of the Dog with Chris Cornell of Soundgarden (who also makes a cameo and was roommates and friends with Vedder) before forming Pearl Jam. The latter has two songs on the soundtrack that don't even appear on their debut. Eddie Vedder plays the drummer in this film's fictional band.

The main romantic couple played by Sydwyck and Campbell meet at a club where Alice In Chains is playing. It is so wild seeing a scene where two girlfriends are just out to go "dancing" and it's freaking Alice In Chains playing- like, people used to dance and have fun to depressing noisy guitar rock. What a time!

The soundtrack is legendary: the aforementioned bands, sure, but also Paul Westerbreg, the sister/leader members of Heart playing a Led Zeppelin song, Chris Cornell solo songs, a token Jimi Hendrix song (who was originally from Seatle though his music has little in common with that era's alt-rock), the Smashing Pumpkins, and two bands for the real grunge-nostalgics: the Screaming Trees and Mudhoney.

(quick side story- there is an apocryphal anecdote that the members of foundational "grunge" band Green River attended a Jane's Addiction concert. Half of the band love them for their mix of funk, glam, showmanship, and guitar leads; the other half hated what they perceived as crass commercialism and shallowness. It highlighted the growing split among the members' musical interests. The latter half went on to form Mudhoney while the former formed Mother Love Bone-> Pearl Jam. I don't know how true that is but it feels true hahah).

Beyond music the film is a fascinating snapshot of how then-contemporary issues of romance and youth culture and sex were represented. If you want to see the beginning of pop culture dealing with 3rd wave feminism, hook-up culture, children of divorced parents forming relationships, body image issues, and the substitution of friends for family, it's all right here, with all sorts of delightfully smug but still cool pop culture references and very mediocre jokes.
 
Jun 11, 2023
2,028
1,518
118
Country
United States
Gender
Male
The only piece of artistic licence they - read James Cameron - should not have taken was what happened to First Officer Murdoch. That wasn't cool and was, as much as could be verified on that night, a complete untruth. In fact I think the man's home town sued Cameron for that.
Cameron owes that family a public apology if nothing else for defamation of character damages if it didn’t really happen like that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BrawlMan

BrawlMan

Lover of beat'em ups.
Legacy
Mar 10, 2016
27,270
11,428
118
Detroit, Michigan
Country
United States of America
Gender
Male
Basically John Wick, but set in India. I get the strong feeling there are some cultural implications that might have gotten over my head, but still a decent movie on its face. It's a relatively slow boil, but when it hit its stride, man, let there be blood.
Less John Wick, and more like the Indian version of The Raid. Gunplay is barely a factor in this movie, but I see what you're trying to go with.
 

Xprimentyl

Made you look...
Legacy
Aug 13, 2011
6,308
4,592
118
Plano, TX
Country
United States
Gender
Male
Less John Wick, and more like the Indian version of The Raid. Gunplay is barely a factor in this movie, but I see what you're trying to go with.
I meant insofar as it is yet another satisfying revenge porn film.
 

BrawlMan

Lover of beat'em ups.
Legacy
Mar 10, 2016
27,270
11,428
118
Detroit, Michigan
Country
United States of America
Gender
Male
I meant insofar as it is yet another satisfying revenge porn film.
Even that's not unique to John Wick. Revenge action films were always done by the dozen, way before he got started. Do you how many action films have revenge as either a motivation factor or becomes about revenge later in the film? A lot of them. Too many of them to count. Before Wick, it was Ninja 2: Shadow Of A Tear (2013). It was the other revenge movie that released a year prior to Wick. Though it is straight to DVD instead of theatrical.
 

Xprimentyl

Made you look...
Legacy
Aug 13, 2011
6,308
4,592
118
Plano, TX
Country
United States
Gender
Male
Even that's not unique to John Wick. Revenge action films were always done by the dozen, way before he got started. Do you how many action films have revenge as either a motivation factor or becomes about revenge later in the film? A lot of them. Too many of them to count. Before Wick, it was Ninja 2: Shadow Of A Tear (2013). It was the other revenge movie that released a year prior to Wick. Though it is straight to DVD instead of theatrical.
Pedantry. I didn't suggest John Wick was the "first" or a "unique" revenge flick. Simply that enough have come in its wake that comparison to the franchise is apropos given how wide an audience it has reached, i.e.: mostly everyone has seen John Wick; I've never even heard of Ninja 2: Shadow Of A Tear.
 

BrawlMan

Lover of beat'em ups.
Legacy
Mar 10, 2016
27,270
11,428
118
Detroit, Michigan
Country
United States of America
Gender
Male
didn't suggest John Wick was the "first" or a "unique" revenge flick. Simply that enough have come in its wake that comparison to the franchise is apropos
There's a whole bunch of satisfying Revenge action flicks before John Wick, and there was going to be a plenty more after Wick, not done in that style. Even the revenge aspect of the Monkey Man is not Wick style. It's your standard this man or group killed my mother or parents. I know there are a bunch of WIC clones out there, but there aren't as many as people like to exaggerate. I'm not implying you are exaggerating by the way.
I've never even heard of Ninja 2: Shadow Of A Tear.
I suggest you get started though you're going to want to see the first movie obviously and then go to the sequel. Scott Adkins kills it. Both movies are better than the entire Wick franchise.


 
Last edited:

Thaluikhain

Elite Member
Legacy
Jan 16, 2010
18,726
3,610
118
Eh, dunno about others, but (especially as the franchise went om) I associate John Wick less with revenge, and more with the aesthetics and vampire coding.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BrawlMan

Johnny Novgorod

Bebop Man
Legacy
Feb 9, 2012
18,572
3,101
118
I watched Highlander for the first time.

If you're like I used to be 2 hours ago and don't know about Highlander - except maybe vaguely through a 90s animated series - the movie is about an immortal Scotsman somehow not played by Sean Connery (he plays Spanish, or Egyptian, I forget) who hails from the 1500s and is now posing as an antiques dealer in 1980s NYC. Connor McLeod is actually played by Christopher Lambert (he's either French, or Belgian, I forget), who looks like the 3D printer ran out of Thomas Jane about 90% of the way and they refueled it with Klaus Kinski.

McLeod survives in battle a wound that should've killed him and is banished from his clan under suspicion of devilry; as he's trying to lead a quiet life elsewhere with his beloved he gets picked up by Ramirez (a flamboyant Connery), who teaches Connor everything about The Gathering and The Quickening and The Kurgan and The Immortals and The Prize while laying the foundation to the R'as al Ghul training montage in Batman Begins.

The gist of it is that there are people living in the world who are randomly designated as immortal (Connor asks why; answer: Why does the sun rise?) and their fate, nebulously prescribed as The Gathering, is to eventually behead each other (only way they can die) because There Can Be Only One. Alright, sure. I can accept random so long as it doesn't get too convoluted.

The movie gets a lot of production value out of the Scottish Highlands and director Russell Mulcahy's flair for music video aesthetics, like swirling aerial cameras, dramatic tracking shots and what I can only describe as pointless-but-awesome choreography. And since this is the 80s, the bad guy is basically a rampaging biker (I'm officially patenting "Cenobite Biff Tannen") and every female character is written as a screaming shrew.

I did like the scene to Queen's Who Wants to Live Forever though. But that set an emotional high that nothing in the rest of the movie really matched, so the ending felt a bit phony and unearned.
 
Last edited:

BrawlMan

Lover of beat'em ups.
Legacy
Mar 10, 2016
27,270
11,428
118
Detroit, Michigan
Country
United States of America
Gender
Male
They're all levels derivative of Grosse Point Blank
The Scott Adkins Ninja movies are throwbacks to 80s and 90s ninja and martial arts flicks. They have nothing to do with Grosse Point Blank. GPB itself came out after True Lies and looks like it took some ideas from it.

I associate John Wick less with revenge, and more with the aesthetics and vampire coding.
The Wick clones either have some secret society of assassins, killers, or a super secret separate op of the government (The Beekeeper). With the usually stylistic or military style hand to hand or gun fights. Not everything is one to one, but you will notice the similarities.

Watch the Anime. It's better than the first movie and I think the original is okay.

 
  • Like
Reactions: Johnny Novgorod

Gordon_4

The Big Engine
Legacy
Apr 3, 2020
6,170
5,462
118
Australia
I watched Highlander for the first time.

If you're like I used to be 2 hours ago and don't know about Highlander - except maybe vaguely through a 90s animated series - the movie is about an immortal Scotsman somehow not played by Sean Connery (he plays Spanish, or Egyptian, I forget) who hails from the 1500s and is now posing as an antiques dealer in 1980s NYC. Connor McLeod is actually played by Christopher Lambert (he's either French, or Belgian, I forget), who looks like the 3D printer ran out of Thomas Jane about 90% of the way and they refueled it with Klaus Kinski.

McLeod survives in battle a wound that should've killed him and is banished from his clan under suspicion of devilry; as he's trying to lead a quiet life elsewhere with his beloved he gets picked up by Ramirez (a flamboyant Connery), who teaches Connor everything about The Gathering and The Quickening and The Kurgan and The Immortals and The Prize while laying the foundation to the R'as al Ghul training montage in Batman Begins.

The gist of it is that there are people living in the world who are randomly designated as immortal (Connor asks why; answer: Why does the sun rise?) and their fate, nebulously prescribed as The Gathering, is to eventually behead each other (only way they can die) because There Can Be Only One. Alright, sure. I can accept random so long as it doesn't get too convoluted.

The movie gets a lot of production value out of the Scottish Highlands and director Russell Mulcahy's flair for music video aesthetics, like swirling aerial cameras, dramatic tracking shots and what I can only describe as pointless-but-awesome choreography. And since this is the 80s, the bad guy is basically a rampaging biker (I'm officially patenting "Cenobite Biff Tannen") and every female character is written as a screaming shrew.

I did like the scene to Queen's Who Wants to Live Forever though. But that set an emotional high that nothing in the rest of the movie really matched, so the ending felt a bit phony and unearned.
Well thanks to the music video for Princes of the Universe, Christopher Lambert can always say he had a small sword fight with Freddie Mercury. And that has to be a rare distinction.

Connery’s character Ramirez is an Egyptian, masquerading as a Spaniard, who spent time in Japan married to a Japanese noblewoman and had a sword made by her father for him. If it was anyone other than walking charisma fountain Connery, audiences would have cried bullshit.

Also that entire soundtrack was worth the price of entry.
 

thebobmaster

Elite Member
Legacy
Apr 5, 2020
2,116
2,090
118
Country
United States
 

Johnny Novgorod

Bebop Man
Legacy
Feb 9, 2012
18,572
3,101
118
Oh...if you then watch the second one...it's notoriously bad. Though, they kept making sequels, and the later ones are also not very good, they like to pretend the second one didn't happen. Though I liked some of it.
I haven't seen it yet but Roger Ebert's review of it is hilarious.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BrawlMan

Casual Shinji

Should've gone before we left.
Legacy
Jul 18, 2009
19,731
4,511
118
Take it from someone who won't even hesitate to defend Exorcist 2:

Highlander 2 is about as bad as everyone says it is.
Oh come on man, Planet Zeist - how could you NOT like it?!!!

I don't know who's brains were replaced by hamster wheels during the making of Highlander 2, but fucking some of them were.
 

Thaluikhain

Elite Member
Legacy
Jan 16, 2010
18,726
3,610
118
I still think the "full measure of life" bit with bagpipes playing Amazing Grace was cool.
 

thebobmaster

Elite Member
Legacy
Apr 5, 2020
2,116
2,090
118
Country
United States