UK General Election 4th July

Satinavian

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Apr 30, 2016
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Ah, had to (shamefully) look up how exactly the parliament in the U.K. works. I knew two houses and stuff... but i was a bit weirded out when i saw: Reform UK: 14% of votes only 1% of seats. So only direct mandates? Wow... that seems... unfair and shit. Now you have ~15 percent of voters in a constant angry/frustrated state. (Not that we here on the other side of the canal have a fair system... also pretty angry people here too, sigh.)
Yes, the fun of First-past-the-Post voting. Which most of the world does not use for this reason.

It also tends to promote two main parties and polarized politics. But good luck getting the oldest uninterrupted parliamentary gouvernment setup to fundamentally change.


But it feels good to see the Tories trashed.
 

Silvanus

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Cabinet appointments coming.

Chancellor of the Exchequer: Rachel Reeves
Sec. of State for Housing/Deputy PM: Angela Rayner
Foreign Secretary: David Lammy
Sec. of State for Home Dept.: Yvette Cooper
Defence Secretary: John Healey
Justice Secretary: Shabana Mahmood
Chancellor of Duchy of Lancaster: Pat McFadden
Energy Secretary: Ed Miliband
Health Secretary: Wes Streeting
Education Secretary: Bridget Phillipson
 

Burnhardt

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Does it really matter?
Yes, the fun of First-past-the-Post voting. Which most of the world does not use for this reason.

It also tends to promote two main parties and polarized politics. But good luck getting the oldest uninterrupted parliamentary gouvernment setup to fundamentally change.


But it feels good to see the Tories trashed.

Well they can implement it with their healthy majority now can't they. Of course that will mean giving up over 300 seats.
 
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XsjadoBlayde

~it ends here~
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Just remembering the reported poll they did for Sunak before election, asking people the first word to that comes to mind when describing him -with the legacy news airing the result using this visual non-bubble graph format;

1000009259.jpg
 

Catfood220

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Well, it is with great disappointment, but no real surprise, that my old stomping ground of Skegness and Boston in Lincolnshire voted in Reform.

The bunch of banjo strumming, sister fucking, inbred hicks.

Sadly I still have family and friends that live there, so I can't avoid the place.
 

Hades

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Mar 8, 2013
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Its nice to see the Tories get almost universal maligned for 14 years of misrule, but while its a democratic faux pass to say it, the British public has been pretty complicit in all that. 14 years and several elections should have been more then enough for the British public to vote them out, but often they just doubled down on the Tories even as disasters piled up.

Cameron's ruthless austerity was electorate rewarded in part because the public were more invested in how his rival ate a sandwich. Then with Brexit the electorate allowed themselves to get swindled and long after this became apparent they doubled down and actually decided that giving Bojo who caused the whole mess a majority was the way to go.

I can sympathize with the public's outrage about the decline of British living standards, but if you vote for the austerity party that's there for the upper class then you get harsh austerity for all except the upper class. And if you decided to torch all your trading agreements with your neighbors then you get a worse economy, and if you elect Boris Johnson you get incompetence and scandal. Since its their country on the line the voters have a right to be angry at all those things, but honestly what else were they expecting when voting for the conservatives?

The electorate can get some leeway due to the damage of austerity often taking some time to emerge and in generally it being a time the poor weren't sympathized much with, but every election after the electorate should have know better.
 

Trunkage

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Its nice to see the Tories get almost universal maligned for 14 years of misrule, but while its a democratic faux pass to say it, the British public has been pretty complicit in all that. 14 years and several elections should have been more then enough for the British public to vote them out, but often they just doubled down on the Tories even as disasters piled up.

Cameron's ruthless austerity was electorate rewarded in part because the public were more invested in how his rival ate a sandwich. Then with Brexit the electorate allowed themselves to get swindled and long after this became apparent they doubled down and actually decided that giving Bojo who caused the whole mess a majority was the way to go.

I can sympathize with the public's outrage about the decline of British living standards, but if you vote for the austerity party that's there for the upper class then you get harsh austerity for all except the upper class. And if you decided to torch all your trading agreements with your neighbors then you get a worse economy, and if you elect Boris Johnson you get incompetence and scandal. Since its their country on the line the voters have a right to be angry at all those things, but honestly what else were they expecting when voting for the conservatives?

The electorate can get some leeway due to the damage of austerity often taking some time to emerge and in generally it being a time the poor weren't sympathized much with, but every election after the electorate should have know better.
While that sandwich thing was stupid and for some reason effected the poles, Cameron won on an anti-migrant platform, blaming them for the 'slow' results from his austerity policies

Like normal, migrants are scapegoats. But with Brexit, there is no way you can blame immigrants anymore and the policies of the Tories were still damaging soceity. So bye, bye Tories. Maybe learn what austerity does to an economy but I have little hope as they still hold up Thatcher as a good PM even though she caused two recession just in her own term
 

XsjadoBlayde

~it ends here~
Apr 29, 2020
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Its nice to see the Tories get almost universal maligned for 14 years of misrule, but while its a democratic faux pass to say it, the British public has been pretty complicit in all that. 14 years and several elections should have been more then enough for the British public to vote them out, but often they just doubled down on the Tories even as disasters piled up.

Cameron's ruthless austerity was electorate rewarded in part because the public were more invested in how his rival ate a sandwich. Then with Brexit the electorate allowed themselves to get swindled and long after this became apparent they doubled down and actually decided that giving Bojo who caused the whole mess a majority was the way to go.

I can sympathize with the public's outrage about the decline of British living standards, but if you vote for the austerity party that's there for the upper class then you get harsh austerity for all except the upper class. And if you decided to torch all your trading agreements with your neighbors then you get a worse economy, and if you elect Boris Johnson you get incompetence and scandal. Since its their country on the line the voters have a right to be angry at all those things, but honestly what else were they expecting when voting for the conservatives?

The electorate can get some leeway due to the damage of austerity often taking some time to emerge and in generally it being a time the poor weren't sympathized much with, but every election after the electorate should have know better.
Is noticeable tendency for some to blame whole populations for the election of their leaders, but sadly that is not how democracy works most the time in our western nations, also it is kinda harmful and even dangerous fallacious thinking that paves an easy path for genocide apologism at its logical end point. I hope Owen Jones can articulate the issues much more eloquently than my fumbling attempts to communicate;