Funny events in anti-woke world

Kwak

Elite Member
Sep 11, 2014
2,190
1,693
118
Country
4
"We need people who are hardcore enough to work eighty hours a week without pay, out of sheer gratitude from being employed by me." - Elon Musk, eventually
Holy crap I thought that was a joke but nope.



"Early on Wednesday, Mr Musk had emailed Twitter employees, saying: "Going forward, to build a breakthrough Twitter 2.0 and succeed in an increasingly competitive world, we will need to be extremely hardcore".

The email asked staff to click "yes" if they wanted to stick around. Those who did not respond by 5pm Eastern time on Thursday (Friday, 9am AEDT) would be considered to have quit and given a severance package, the email said."
 

Trunkage

Nascent Orca
Legacy
Jun 21, 2012
8,599
2,825
118
Brisbane
Gender
Cyborg
For your own sake, please just stop reading the internet.
Well, I am a bit tired of Christians forcing their beliefs on other people and hypocrites in general. I would also really like these type of Christians to stop pretending they a) know what God wants b) know what other Christians think is good c) understand that they are not the majority, even in Christendom d) go and actually read the Bible

So I took two days off. Just for you
 

BrawlMan

Lover of beat'em ups.
Legacy
Mar 10, 2016
26,252
11,031
118
Detroit, Michigan
Country
United States of America
Gender
Male
Well, I am a bit tired of Christians forcing their beliefs on other people and hypocrites in general. I would also really like these type of Christians to stop pretending they a) know what God wants b) know what other Christians think is good c) understand that they are not the majority, even in Christendom d) go and actually read the Bible

So I took two days off. Just for you
And may those "true/good Christians" rot in their personal hell they created, and march themselves towards closer to actual hell. They will have no one to blame but themselves. 🙏 Amen.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dalisclock

tstorm823

Elite Member
Legacy
Aug 4, 2011
6,366
920
118
Country
USA
Well, I am a bit tired of Christians forcing their beliefs on other people and hypocrites in general. I would also really like these type of Christians to stop pretending they a) know what God wants b) know what other Christians think is good c) understand that they are not the majority, even in Christendom d) go and actually read the Bible

So I took two days off. Just for you
Not sure how that relates to the conversation, but okay.
 

Avnger

Trash Goblin
Legacy
Apr 1, 2016
2,058
1,196
118
Country
United States
Not sure how that relates to the conversation, but okay.
It's relevant in two ways (and telling that you can't see it).

1. One of the reasons the bill Trunkage was originally talking about was opposed was due to people claiming they have a "religious belief" in discriminating against interracial and LGBT marriages.

2. Your arguments on this forum match exactly what Trunkage has described.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Dalisclock

XsjadoBlaydette

Piss-Drinking Nazi Wine-Mums
May 26, 2022
953
1,265
98
Country
Wales

Five people are dead and at least 18 are wounded following a mass shooting at Club Q in Colorado Springs, according to the Colorado Springs Police Department. Club Q is one of Colorado Springs’ oldest LGBTQ night clubs, and it regularly hosts drag shows and community events.

According to Lt. Pamela Castro, the CSPD public information officer, the first calls regarding a shooting at the club came in at 11:56 p.m on Nov. 19. CSPD arrived at 12:00 a.m., and the suspect, identified as 22 year-old Anderson Lee Aldrich, was taken into custody at 12:02 a.m.

“We know one or more patrons heroically intervened to subdue the suspect. And we praise those individuals who did so because their actions clearly saved lives,” said Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers.

In a statement posted to Facebook, Club Q wrote, “Club Q is devastated by the senseless attack on our community. Our [prayers] and thoughts are with all the victims and their families and friends. We thank the quick reactions of heroic customers that subdued the gunman and ended this hate attack.”

“Club Q is a safe haven for our LGBTQ citizens,” said CSPD Chief Adrian Vasquez. “Every citizen has the right to feel safe and secure in our city, to go about our beautiful city without fear of being harmed or treated poorly. I’m so terribly saddened and heartbroken.”

A 2016 vigil for victims of the Orlando Pulse shooting at Club Q.

Vasquez cautioned that the investigation is still in the early stages, and noted “The FBI is already on scene and assisting with the investigation. We are also working to identify the victims who have died and notify their families.”

On June 18, 2021, Aldrich was involved in bomb threat in the Lorson Ranch neighborhood. According to a news release from the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office, “The reporting party said her son was threatening to cause harm to her with a homemade bomb, multiple weapons, and ammunition. The reporting party was not in the home at the time when she made the call and was not sure where her son was. Deputies responded to the home and after further investigation realized the suspect, Anderson Lee Aldrich, DOB: 05/20/2000, was in the 6300 block of Pilgrimage Road (which is approximately 1 mile away from the address on Rubicon Drive). Our deputies contacted the suspect by phone and he refused to comply with orders to surrender.”

Deputies evacuated the neighborhood, and over an hour later Aldrich surrendered. According to the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office, “The Regional Explosives Unit cleared both homes and did not find any explosive devices.”

Though Aldrich was charged with two counts of felony menacing and three counts of first-degree kidnapping, the Colorado Springs Gazette reported that “no formal charges were pursued in this case, which has since been sealed, according to the DA’s office.”

Michael Allen, the 4th Judicial District Attorney, who declined to charge Aldrich in 2021, expressed sympathy for the victims and their families. “This is a tragic day for our community, and we stand in solidarity with the victims and their family members as we make sense out of a senseless crime,” he said. “Every person, regardless of who they are, has the right to be secure from fear and physical harm. Actions taken to strike fear in specific communities will not be tolerated in our community. This is particularly true for communities that have been maligned, harassed and targeted by persons or groups to intimidate and cause harm to members of those communities.”

According to Allen, Aldrich is the only suspect at this time.

“The Club Q shooting in Colorado Springs was horrific, sickening, and devastating news to wake up to,” said Governor Jared Polis, Colorado’s first openly gay governor, in a Facebook post. “My heart breaks for the family and friends of those lost, injured, and traumatized in this horrific shooting. I have spoken with Mayor Suthers and clarified that every state resource is available to local law enforcement in Colorado Springs. We are eternally grateful for the brave individuals who blocked the gunman, likely saving lives in the process, and for the first responders who responded swiftly to this horrific shooting. Colorado stands with our LGTBQ community and everyone impacted by this tragedy as we mourn.”

The Club Q shooting comes after more than a year of conservative politicians and commentators demonizing the LGBTQ community and holding increasingly violent protests against drag events. This summer, Rep. Dave Williams (R-CO Springs) and Rep. Mark Baisley (R-Roxborough Park) raised concerns about “groomers” at a Highlands Ranch drag show. U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-CO), who in June said, “The left is grooming our kids,” tweeted this morning, “The news out of Colorado Springs is absolutely awful. This morning the victims & their families are in my prayers.”

Rep.-elect Stephanie Vigil, who defeated Colorado Springs City Councilor Dave Donelson, who campaigned on his anti-LGBTQ stance, expressed shock — but not surprise — at the news of the shooting. “I’m just furious,” she said. “I don’t know how many times we have to say that hate speech and bigotry have consequences. I feel like a number of us have said in this community over the last few years in particular that it’s just a matter of time. Right here in our own city. The things that people say that dehumanize others in our community tend to lead to violence. It’s not even the first time.”

Colorado Springs City Councilor Nancy Henjum also expressed her shock and dismay at the violence. “How many times do we have to do this?” she asked. “There’s no words, honestly. I’m deeply, deeply sad for the people who lost their lives, for their family members, for our entire community, certainly for the LGBTQ community.”

Inside Out Youth Services, a nonprofit that serves LGBTQ youth in Colorado Springs, said in a statement, “We are absolutely devastated by the horrific act of violence at Club Q in Colorado Springs last night. Our community is mourning the loss of five loved ones today, along with their friends and family. Here in Colorado Springs, Inside Out Youth Services works with young people every day to build community. The youth we serve deserve better — they deserve to be safe from fear, threats, and violence. We call on Colorado’s leaders to step up and condemn this hateful attack and condemn the anti-LGBTQIA2+ rhetoric that fueled it. Today is Transgender Day of Remembrance, when we mourn the lives of transgender people who have been killed. This mass shooting has compounded the pain already felt so keenly by our community.”

1668987965464.png

Former prosecutors accuse Michael Allen, the 4th Judicial District Attorney, of mismanaging the office.
Chancey Bush. The Gazette file.

The Colorado Springs-based 4th Judicial District Attorney's Office is underfunded, overwhelmed with felony cases and in a state of turmoil, according to seven lawyers who previously worked there.

The former employees said they felt overworked in what some called a "toxic" environment that harmed their mental health.

The attorneys spoke out after the apparent August suicide of a prominent deputy district attorney rocked what is one of Colorado's busiest prosecutor's offices. The death underscored conditions in the office that are adding too much pressure to an already arduous job, the former staff members said.

“That job put me in a place mentally that I've never been in in my entire life," said one former deputy district attorney whom District Attorney Michael Allen directly supervised before being elected to the top spot.

The former prosecutor was one of two The Gazette spoke with who said the job pushed them to seek therapy. She said the election of Allen "absolutely" caused her to leave. The attorney, now in private practice, asked to speak anonymously because her current job requires her to work with the DA's office on occasion.

She was also one of three female attorneys who resigned within the last year who said the office had a climate of discriminating against women, allegations Allen vigorously disputes.

As of late last month, at least 54 employees, or about 21% of the office's workforce, departed the office since the beginning of the year, according to a list provided by Howard Black, a 4th Judicial District spokesman. Of the employees who left so far this year, at least 25 were attorneys, according to the list, which is more than a quarter of the office's prosecutorial power. Most of the jobs were filled, but five attorney positions remained open, Black said in an email late last month.

Several of the former prosecutors who spoke with the Gazette said they voted for Allen in the 2020 election. One said the office is now "hemorrhaging" deputy district attorneys.

One of the departures: Deputy District Attorney Andrew Lower was found dead Aug. 5 in Chaffee County after friends and coworkers feared he was missing Aug. 1. Based on evidence collected at the scene, law enforcement officials closed their investigation and determined no one else was involved.

Officials have not publicly stated that Lower committed suicide. But El Paso County Coroner Dr. Leon Kelly, whose office performed Lower's autopsy, said, “From our perspective based on the autopsy, that’s our feeling, that this is self-inflicted."

Before he died, police say Lower sent an email to the entire staff of the District Attorney's Office on Aug. 1. In the email, Lower said he had concerns about conditions in the office and the leadership of District Attorney Allen and former District Attorney Dan May. The email raised questions about the hiring of a controversial deputy DA, the demotion of another longtime prosecutor and the promotion of a prosecutor whose family contributed to Allen's campaign, according to a copy obtained and verified by The Gazette.

Former employees said they were less concerned with some of the specific issues raised by Lower. They acknowledged that the pandemic and typical DA's office career progression have driven some of the staffing issues.

But many of the employees placed some of the blame for conditions in the office at the feet of Allen, elected last year, and also said the problems extend back to the tenure of his predecessor, Dan May. Lower was an office manager under May.

Allen, in an interview with The Gazette, responded to the complaints and the news of Lower's suicide, saying prosecutors have a high stakes, stressful and challenging job that coronavirus has only made more difficult. DAs are asked to vividly recreate grisly scenes in courtrooms and listen repeatedly to traumatic stories from victims of heinous crimes. Lower, a veteran prosecutor, specialized in homicides.

"We get secondary trauma from the stuff that we do," Allen said. "You're dealing with people that have either suffered some really tragic events or have been killed. And we go out to scenes and see these sorts of things. We talk to victims who have lived through some really horrific events. And that can weigh on you."

May did not respond to requests for comment.

1668988114732.png

The entrance of the El Paso County Terry R. Harris Judicial Complex on Tejon Street.


'Trusted member of the team'

Two of Lower’s friends said they believed workplace concerns contributed to his death. Even though he and his wife, Susan Chadderdon, also a prosecutor, had recently divorced, it was his distress in the office that most significantly drove his apparent depression, said one.

“In the conversations I have had with him over the last six months … He has mentioned concerns about the office every single time almost the entire time I was talking with him,” said the friend, also a former office employee.

She, like other former employees who spoke with The Gazette, was reluctant to speak out because she works locally as a defense attorney and feared the DA's office would seek retribution.

“He really cared about his job more than probably anything in his life,” she said.

Another friend of Lower, former Deputy District Attorney Andrew Hug, said work was likely one factor among others that led to Lower's death. Hug said he had lunch with Lower two days before he went missing.

“It was a combination of a lot of things. Yes, there was work stuff, he was definitely frustrated with the office," Hug said. "We had that conversation. But I know he had other stuff as well.”

In his last email, sent to the entire office, Lower acknowledged issues outside of work.

"As most of my close friends in the office knew, I have not been happy here since the new administration took over, but also for some personal reasons as well," he wrote.

Allen lamented the loss of the longtime prosecutor, and said the days and weeks following Lower's death have been difficult for the office.

"It's just really tough to lose somebody that's a trusted member of the team," Allen said.

Lower's suicide wasn't the only one suffered by the office. Another deputy district attorney committed suicide in 2018. In the autopsy, the coroner determined the man's death was a "deliberate and self-inflicted act" and said he had a history of depression.

A former prosecutor and friend of the man said she believed his mental illness was "absolutely" tied to office-related stress at a "dark and toxic" workplace that featured problematic relationships between co-workers. She requested to speak anonymously to discuss a sensitive issue and said she worried speaking out would harm her reputation.

"Mental health issues are rife there," she said.

Hug, who also knew the man, said his mental illness was caused by personal issues and was not work-related.

Security alert issued

The Monday after Lower sent his email, Allen called 4th Judicial District Chief Judge William Bain.

“Just to let them know if they see him that we’re looking for him and that he is in a potentially distressed situation, that they should be aware of that," Allen said. "There was never any threats to anybody.”

That day, Allen sent an email to office staff connecting them with counseling services and informing them "there have been no threats made to any other individuals either in this office or anyone else."

But in an email to court officials, Judge Bain said Allen was concerned Lower could be "a significant danger to himself and possibly others."

Court Executive Scott Sosebee confirmed that officials believed there was a security threat after Lower went missing. Sosebee said it later turned into "concern for the individual.”

A Colorado Springs police report said Lower "sent out an email to all employees of the District Attorney’s Office. The email did not contain any threats to anyone but was believed to be a suicide note.” The email was sent around 2:45 p.m. on Aug. 1, a Sunday. "I wrote this so those people that have expressed the same thought I have had could have a public voice,” Lower wrote.

The email was primarily addressed to Allen, offering pointed criticism.

Lower's friend Hug pushed back.

"Most people generally like Mike Allen as a person and want to see him succeed,” Hug said, adding that Lower was "on the extreme side of being upset with the office."

Allen said it was difficult to respond to the criticism of former employees, but that the demands of the job sometimes prevented him from checking on staff as often as he would like. With many staff members working from home during the pandemic, he said he would drop in on virtual meetings.

"What I have always made a point to do is to get out into the office and to talk to people," he said.

Gender-based issues

While Lower's letter did not specifically raise sex discrimination in the office as a concern, he did lament the demotion of Senior Deputy DA Donna Billek, whom he called the "trial attorney that we called out on the most tough and complex cases." Billek resigned after a demotion that came before the office hired Dave Young, a former DA for Adams and Broomfield counties, to a senior post.

Three female former deputy district attorneys who spoke to The Gazette said female attorneys in the office feel they are treated differently, but Allen said his record proves he's not sexist.

Raised by a single mother, Allen selected a woman, Martha McKinney, to be assistant district attorney, the second-highest position in the office. "She is as strong of a person as I know, and it has nothing to do with her gender," he said.

Other leadership positions in the office were also filled by women, he said. "Over 50% of the leadership in this office is women,” he said.

The DA's website shows three women listed as executive staff alongside five men. Black, the DA spokesman, said the 50% figure Allen cited referred to the broader leadership structure of the office, which includes more supervisors and managers.

"The idea that I would engender an environment that women are not appreciated is complete nonsense, and it's offensive," Allen said.

The former female employee who was friends with the prosecutor who committed suicide in 2018 said she was surprised by the allegations of sexism because she did not experience any gender discrimination while at the office. She left the office before Allen took over as DA, but said, "He's such a good guy, and he's so kind."

"I did work with Mike on occasion, and I admired him," she said. "I think highly of Michael Allen."

Overworked and understaffed

The list of departures provided by spokesman Black indicated about 36 of the 54 employees, including attorneys, who departed this year are women.

The turnover is pushing less qualified deputies to move up to work in district court, and even on homicides, more quickly than normal, critics contend.

As more prosecutors leave the office, the caseload for those who remain on the job increases, creating more stress, the former prosecutors said. Some former employees called on Allen to mitigate the workload, and worried the issue was getting worse.

“I think that morale has definitely gone down a little bit recently just because a lot of people have left and they can’t really fill those positions," former Deputy DA Hug said. "The DA’s office is perpetually understaffed, and with the recent people leaving, it’s become worse.”

Another former prosecutor, Jimmy Litle, said he left the office largely because he was feeling burned out. “One of the biggest reasons that I left was that I had a lot of cases on my plate,” he said.

Litle, who had worked in the office since 2013 and left this summer, said he didn't have any hard feelings toward the office or Allen, his direct supervisor before becoming elected district attorney.

“I think the world of Michael,” he said.

The issues of stress and overwork are not unique to the judicial district, and they did not start when Allen took over as DA, sources said. Online job boards are packed with advertisements for open positions in DA's offices across the state, and former employees say the Colorado Springs office has almost never been fully staffed. The public defender's office is experiencing similar staffing issues, sources said.

At the 18th Judicial District, which includes Arapahoe and Douglas counties, 23 attorneys have departed since the start of the year, said DA John Kellner, who assumed the office's top spot in January. He said attorneys have departed his office for other opportunities as prosecutors, to enter private practice and to be closer to their families.

“I think it is important to recognize if there’s turnover after an election, it's not uncommon,” Kellner said.

A natural turnover hits many DA’s offices when younger lawyers leave to pursue private practice and bigger paychecks.

"I don't blame them for taking that option," Allen said. "It's part of their career progression and I cheer them on and will support them in that."

Prosecutors aren't leaving for other district attorney's offices, according to Allen, which he said was an issue for the office in the past.

Allen said the fiscally conservative politics of El Paso County makes coming up with more tax money difficult, compound staffing issues. A Republican and self-proclaimed fiscal conservative, Allen has still sought more money for his office. The district can't match the salaries of highly experienced DAs at other offices, he said, which makes retention of attorneys with five to 10 years of experience an issue.

The 4th Judicial District has less money than other large prosecutor's offices in the state, records show. Though the 4th Judicial District in the 2020 fiscal year processed more criminal filings than any judicial district in the state, the DA's office received significantly less funding than the Denver DA's office and the 18th Judicial District.

“I’m doing everything I can possibly to give people salaries to something that I think they deserve, but that’s not just my call,” Allen said. “I don’t get to raise taxes. Everything I get as far as budget comes from the county commissioners.”
-

Michael Allen takes the reins in the 4th Judicial District

1668987796005.png

Michael Allen, 4th Judicial District Attorney, is taking over for Dan May, who is retiring.

Michael allen, the newly elected 4th Judicial District Attorney, was sworn in Jan. 12. Term-limited at 12 years, Allen takes the helm at the DA’s office after 12 years of working under outgoing DA Dan May, most recently as senior deputy district attorney. May was the second-longest-serving DA in the history of the 4th Judicial District. Allen assumes leadership just after the Colorado Legislature passed Senate Bill 217, the police reform law created in the wake of widespread national and local protests over police violence, and as Colorado lawmakers, like Democrat Pete Lee (CD11), consider new legislation aimed at reforming the criminal justice system.

Allen’s main priority will be to carry out the district’s basic duties. “The overarching thing always is we need to ensure public safety,” he says. “We’re still going to be doing a lot of holding violent and career criminals accountable when we need to, but also looking to impact positively with problem-solving courts, people who need that second chance to get on their feet. We’ll use that too, because that does have a positive impact on public safety as well, if we can divert people into treatment and get them out of the criminal justice system.”

While Allen acknowledges the benefits of problem-solving courts and non-punitive approaches to criminal justice, he expresses some concerns regarding the Legislature’s attempts at reform, especially Sen. Lee’s proposed juvenile justice reforms. “The problem is that we’ve had some juveniles that have committed some really violent and atrocious acts in our community, and what the Legislature has done and where the Legislature seems to be going is to make it more challenging to hold those people accountable,” says Allen. “So if someone commits a murder, to me that means we have to give as much effort as we possibly can on those types of cases, and it doesn’t matter whether the offender is an adult or a child, in my mind, because somebody has lost their life. It has to be measured, is my point. We can’t completely remove criminal punishment from our repertoire, or arsenal of options just because they’re a kid, if they commit a violent act.”

May has similar concerns regarding the Legislature’s attempts at reform. “What is Michael Allen going to face?” asks May. “He’s going to face a Legislature that’s anti-prosecution and anti-cop and wants to make it better for the criminal, the hardcore criminal. Those are going to be very difficult issues for him. We’re finding it hard with police right now to recruit. It’s even got to the point, both with prosecution and police, you find a group of people who are just dedicated to public service, dedicated to their communities. Today I’ve got generational police officers telling their kids, ‘This is not a job you want anymore. America doesn’t like us anymore.’ It really is a public perception issue.”

May says criminal justice reform largely comes down to how law enforcement is perceived. “I think the biggest obstacle for prosecutors across the country and locally, and police, is public perception,” says May, who feels that police and prosecutors are being singled out. “I can tell you I’ve prosecuted police when they’ve committed crimes, but those individuals are such a small minority of what represents police. I’ve also prosecuted teachers. I haven’t lost my faith in the teacher’s association because I’ve prosecuted teachers for sexual assault, and murder, even.

May says the Legislature can tie the hands of prosecutors during difficult cases. “There’s going to be a sentencing reform coming up this next term,” he says, ”and I’m fearful that it is going to try to let serious criminals out of prison. I’m sorry, there is evil in this world, and I’ve got to have the tools at the other end to take care of those evil people.”

The issue of judicial reform will be pertinent to Allen, as the 4th Judicial District is one of the busiest in Colorado. “As I look at my caseload, we have the highest caseload in the state of Colorado,” says May. “We’ll handle 35,000 cases this year. We’ll handle 7,000 to 8,000 felonies. When I look across the state of Colorado though, 90 percent of the felons in our courts will not go to prison. They’ll go to problem-solving court, they’ll get probation, they’ll get halfway houses. We look at alternatives and innovative ways of doing things, but you get down to 10 percent or less, even 5 percent, are very hardcore criminals. Some people, quite frankly, are evil. The Legislature is taking away my ability to deal with that.”


One of Allen’s first moves as DA was to fire longtime prosecutor Jeff Lindsey, who in 2017 received the Colorado District Attorney’s Council with the Outstanding Faculty Award and was named Trainer of the Year. “When I’m evaluating who’s going to be really good for a leadership position in my administration,” says Allen, “especially a high-level leadership position like a chief deputy district attorney — which is what Jeff had — it’s going to be somebody that I know I can trust, is going to be doing the right things for the community, and have their eyes firmly affixed on what our mission is in the office. They’ve got to have merit, they’ve got to have the right experience, they’ve got to have leadership qualities, and they’ve got to want to do what is required of leadership.”

Reggie Short is the new chief deputy district attorney for the district court, and Andy Vaughan is now the chief deputy district attorney for the county court. Former two-term 11th Judicial District Attorney Thom LeDoux was promoted to senior deputy district attorney for the 4th Judicial District.

1668987749443.png

Dan May

Allen has also hired former 17th Judicial District Attorney Dave Young, who declined to charge the officers involved in the 2019 death of 23-year-old Elijah McClain. Officers placed McClain in a chokehold and first responders administered ketamine, a sedative. Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser announced Jan. 8 that the officers’ actions would be referred to a grand jury following massive protests in Aurora this summer. Young’s office was involved in filing multiple felony charges against protesters, stemming from a July 3 protest that encircled the Aurora Police Station. Organizers of that protest have been charged with kidnapping and conspiracy, among other charges.

When asked about the perception of a disparity in legal responses to protesters this summer, Allen says, “As far as any case, whether it’s protesters or people drive through protest crowds, I think it’s imperative that we evaluate the case based on the merits of the evidence and not be swayed by political pressure one way or the other, and that’s what we’re always going to do.”

During his time in the 17th Judicial District, Young was also accused of having an affair with a victim advocate in his office, who later died by suicide in 2019, according to The Colorado Sun.

Such shakeups are part of the transition of elected officials; compare Allen’s changes with those of newly elected 1st Judicial District Attorney Alexis King, who fired 10 employees, including six senior prosecutors and three deputy district attorneys, according to reporting from The Denver Post.

Though Allen now leads the 4th Judicial District, May will stay on to prosecute a case he started in 1988. “Mary Vialpondo was the victim and it went unsolved until it was solved through DNA here recently,” says May. “We were set for trial. We actually started our trial in October, we were partway through picking the jury when the court mistried the case because of concerns about COVID. I’ve been on that case since 1988. Michael Allen’s agreed that I can stay on that so I will finish that case out. That’s the only thing I’ll be doing.”

May will be paid as a contract attorney while he works on the Vialpondo case. “It’s just for a limited scope, just for that case,” says Allen. “It’s also for a limited amount of time, so it’s a prorated amount. It’s equivalent to if he were a senior deputy district attorney in the office for a year, but prorated down to only the amount of time he’s going to be here.” For context, Short, the newly promoted chief deputy district attorney, was paid $118,818, or $57.12 an hour, in 2019 as a senior deputy district attorney, according to openpayrolls.com.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: BrawlMan

XsjadoBlaydette

Piss-Drinking Nazi Wine-Mums
May 26, 2022
953
1,265
98
Country
Wales
That's not funny, not funny at all.
Unless in the sense that a maggot infested rotting cut of meat might taste 'funny'.
Oh, um, I thought it was established like more than 80% of posts here are just plain dread and depression with only the odd moments of humour being the brief weekend opioid that keeps us relatively sane enough to function? I been posting loads of depressing shit, plz don't tell me everyone thought they were jokes now! If so, sorry! 🫣 (Did consider making a seperate thread for it though, but was too drained to think of anything useful to add to the horror beyond just sharing the information).

NOTICE ME SENPAI!
Wtf, I don't understand what point he's even trying to make!
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: BrawlMan

XsjadoBlaydette

Piss-Drinking Nazi Wine-Mums
May 26, 2022
953
1,265
98
Country
Wales
He's the funny meme man tempting Trump to come back to Twitter. Or at least that's how he sees himself.

Everyone else sees the 50yo richest manchild in the world pathetically begging for orange daddy's approval.
Oh for cryin out loud. Is it possible to overdose on cringe? This is hitting levels am not accustomed to. it still doesn't even make sense too! I hate these fucking billionaires just able to make themselves everyone else's problem when they're fucking bored or unable to get over their last split up, you literally can't avoid them without going totally off the grid and living wild. Cúnts!
 

twistedmic

Elite Member
Legacy
Sep 8, 2009
2,542
210
68
Everyone else sees the 50yo richest manchild in the world pathetically begging for orange daddy's approval.
It’s really sad and pathetic when you realize that orange daddy is 76yo dubiously rich manchild desperately craving the approval and attention of his own daddy (the dead one or papa putin).
 

Kwak

Elite Member
Sep 11, 2014
2,190
1,693
118
Country
4
Oh, um, I thought it was established like more than 80% of posts here are just plain dread and depression with only the odd moments of humour being the brief weekend opioid that keeps us relatively sane enough to function? I been posting loads of depressing shit, plz don't tell me everyone thought they were jokes now! If so, sorry! 🫣 (Did consider making a seperate thread for it though, but was too drained to think of anything useful to add to the horror beyond just sharing the informatiin.
Yeah I know, I've been tempted to say that many times in this thread this was just the time I did.
It's easy to laugh at morons when they only affect themselves, harder when their insistent moronic evil effects everyone else.
I will however contribute this genuinely ridiculous antiwoke moment from desantis' s victory speech.

"... , and we reject woke ideology. We fight the woke in the legislature. We fight the woke in the schools. We fight the woke in the corporations. We will never, ever surrender to the woke mob. Florida is where woke goes to die. "

The word has just lost all meaning at this point.
 

The Rogue Wolf

Stealthy Carnivore
Legacy
Nov 25, 2007
16,212
8,661
118
Stalking the Digital Tundra
Gender
✅
"... , and we reject woke ideology. We fight the woke in the legislature. We fight the woke in the schools. We fight the woke in the corporations. We will never, ever surrender to the woke mob. Florida is where woke goes to die. "

The word has just lost all meaning at this point.
I'd say they've redefined "woke" as "anything which does not glorify white people and only white people, and is therefore evil".