Master Racier

Renegade-pizza

New member
Jul 26, 2010
642
0
0
The master race has some snazzy clothing. Also, can the human eye notice the difference between 60 and 120 fps? I know there's a cap before it becomes redundant to increase fps, but I forget
 

CaitSeith

Formely Gone Gonzo
Legacy
Apr 14, 2020
5,180
168
68
Renegade-pizza said:
The master race has some snazzy clothing. Also, can the human eye notice the difference between 60 and 120 fps? I know there's a cap before it becomes redundant to increase fps, but I forget
Yes, it can. But, does the human care in the first place? ;)
 

KyuubiNoKitsune-Hime

Lolita Style, The Best Style!
Jan 12, 2010
2,151
0
0
That was great!

Renegade-pizza said:
The master race has some snazzy clothing. Also, can the human eye notice the difference between 60 and 120 fps? I know there's a cap before it becomes redundant to increase fps, but I forget
Depends on the person in question, some people can't tell the difference between 30 and 60, others tend to max out at 70, the average last I heard was about 72 FPS. Some people can identify up to 120 FPS, but that's apparently about the maximum. It depends on both eye health and effective reaction speed of the person in question.
 

Fappy

\[T]/
May 1, 2020
12,010
0
0
Country
United States
I literally just got a 2k monitor last night. Damn, just made the cut! That was a close one!

120fps... well, I can run Morrowind Overhaul at 150fps. Does that count? >.>
 

munx13

Some guy on the internet
Dec 17, 2008
431
0
0
Renegade-pizza said:
The master race has some snazzy clothing. Also, can the human eye notice the difference between 60 and 120 fps? I know there's a cap before it becomes redundant to increase fps, but I forget
I remember reading some study that said airforce pilots stop noticing differences after around 250 fps

I do have my old CRT monitor somewhere, I've been meaning to get it out and test it sometime for myself.
 

Covarr

PS Thanks
May 29, 2009
1,559
0
0
Renegade-pizza said:
The master race has some snazzy clothing. Also, can the human eye notice the difference between 60 and 120 fps? I know there's a cap before it becomes redundant to increase fps, but I forget
At that point it's harder to notice and harder still to care, certainly less than the difference between 30 and 60, but the difference is still obvious to many. I have a 144Hz monitor and the difference between 144 and 60 can be really striking to me depending on the game.

Although interestingly, I notice it most in the desktop with mouse cursor movement. Since that cursor flies across the screen at high speeds, more frames is very noticeable.

P.S. Thanks
 

Kenjitsuka

New member
Sep 10, 2009
3,051
0
0
Been happily using my 1440p monitor for a long time now. And got a 4K TV hooked up via HDMI too. I play Secret of Mana (SNES, 1993) on that!
 

Lightknight

Mugwamp Supreme
Nov 26, 2008
4,860
0
0
Aw man, this is exactly why we can't elect all video game reviewers to the board that decides the entry metrics...

Kenjitsuka said:
Been happily using my 1440p monitor for a long time now. And got a 4K TV hooked up via HDMI too. I play Secret of Mana (SNES, 1993) on that!
I didn't know there were hipster versions of the "master race" :p
 

Lightknight

Mugwamp Supreme
Nov 26, 2008
4,860
0
0
Diablo1099 said:
....Man...How the hell do they get up to 120 FPS? Most Developers don't even go that high O_O
Crossfire (multiple video cards) usually. Or just keep everything else in the game at really crappy specs if you have a decent card.
 

Zipa

batlh bIHeghjaj.
Dec 19, 2010
1,489
0
0
Diablo1099 said:
....Man...How the hell do they get up to 120 FPS? Most Developers don't even go that high O_O
Gsync [http://www.geforce.co.uk/hardware/technology/g-sync] and Freesync [http://www.amd.com/en-us/innovations/software-technologies/technologies-gaming/freesync] are designed to go that high (well upto 144 hertz) Both are designed to get rid of screen tearing and reduce input lag.

Nvidia explain it pretty well on their website. [http://www.geforce.co.uk/hardware/technology/g-sync/technology] but the short version is that the framerate of the GPU and monitor match all the time rather than the GPU trying to hit the max fps of the monitor all the time.
 

Parasondox

New member
Jun 15, 2013
3,229
0
0
This may be all fun and all for gamers who are really committed to gaming but how far and how much can the human eye take when it comes to higher and higher frame rates, resolution and VR tech. Don't our eyes have limits?
 

kajinking

New member
Aug 12, 2009
896
0
0
Just me or is that PS4 guy in the first panel scavenging what looks to be a 80 mm case fan? What does a PS4 need with PC parts?

(As someone who's been doing a lot of computer repair these are the things I notice)
 

TheMysteriousGX

Elite Member
Legacy
Apr 12, 2020
3,155
913
118
Country
United States
Technically, no. Human eyes don't have a limit.

The processing time of our neurons might start lagging at some point, becoming unnoticable.

That said; I personally can occasionally notice the difference between 30 and 60 fps, but have yet to have a reason to care. This will save me a fortune in hardware costs over the coming years.
 

McMarbles

New member
May 7, 2009
1,566
0
0
First they came for Nintendo, and I did nothing because lol Nintendo is for babby.

Then they came for Microsoft, and I did nothing because XBox is for dudebro douchebags.

Then they came for Sony, and I did nothing because they were console peasants.

Then they came for me, and nobody did anything because this parody is forced and labored.
 

fix-the-spade

New member
Feb 25, 2008
8,639
0
0
Renegade-pizza said:
Also, can the human eye notice the difference between 60 and 120 fps? I know there's a cap before it becomes redundant to increase fps, but I forget
I have good news for you, the answer is well over 200 for most average human beings, so there is a long way to go before we reach the fps cap. If you spend a lot of time using screens for detail and motion oriented work (like say... gaming) it can go far, far over the 220fps average.

However, around 50-60fps is where human beings stop perceiving the flickering between images. This is why movies are projected at 72fps (24 times 3 to be exact) because actually projecting 24images per second makes films look horrific, whilst most TV is broadcast at 60fps (30x2) or 50fps (25x2).

If you watch a film on a projector at an actual 24fps you can see the black spaces between images, it's awful. On games at least the previous image stays in place until the new one is rendered, so flicker at 30fps isn't as much of an issue.

Don't worry, there is plenty more time for increasing frames per second a resolutions to keep those master race wallets empty.
 

Teoes

Poof, poof, sparkles!
Jun 1, 2010
5,174
0
0
The "Wooten tag" greeting killed me. Love the artwork on this one. Nicely done, Cory.
 

OldNewNewOld

New member
Mar 2, 2011
1,494
0
0
Renegade-pizza said:
The master race has some snazzy clothing. Also, can the human eye notice the difference between 60 and 120 fps? I know there's a cap before it becomes redundant to increase fps, but I forget
This is a nice short text about the topic.
It explains quite a few things about fps and how we see/don't see things.

http://www.100fps.com/how_many_frames_can_humans_see.htm