Movie, TV, Web Series, and Music Hot Take(s).

Bob_McMillan

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Counter argument: Luke's death achieved "Luke will not solve the problem and it will be up to the new characters"
The whole movie was about Luke not being the savior the Resistance thought they needed. They made it very clear that even if Luke were to take up a laser sword again and take on Snoke, he would lose. That's the entire point of him "fighting" Kylo through an illusion. So I disagree, while Luke would have definitely been an asset to the Resistance, he was hardly the key to win the war.
 

Casual Shinji

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I was doing a bit of reading on the movie "Prisoners" - Dune director Denis Villeneuve's first English language movie as I understand it - about how its meant to be a sort of deconstruction of movies like Taken from around the same era. Now from what I understand, the movie is a hell of a thriller that will have a vice like grip on your heart and your arsehole at different times; recommended go watch.

However, I don't buy the alleged deconstructive aspect. A movie is all about believability in the moment. Now sure, Hugh Jackman makes an utter fucking fiasco of his attempt at vigilante heroism: but that's because he's a fucking carpenter and on the verge of a complete breakdown and a man who until this point lived a very normal existence with no capacity for instinctual violence. Conversely, Liam Neeson's character in Taken is a former military/intelligence field operative who has the experience, the training, the knowledge, the attitude and the contacts in friendly countries to make his feats against the villains while still highly improbable, justifiable given his CV. I feel like if they wanted to sort of take it apart that way, the needed a closer mirror to Taken (or Man on Fire) to make the point work.

Luckily Villeneuve and team still made a very, very respectable movie out of it with some powerhouse performances.
Jackman's character is a prepper/survivalist. We're introduced to him hunting; a very traditional and idealized manly act, signifying him providing for his family. And as the movie progresses it's shown he's a man who is (expected anyway) to take the lead and do things his own way. We see he has shelves of canned goods, and he has his daughter wearing a safety whistle. While this doesn't make him an ex-commando, he isn't just your average dad who works as a carpenter. He has dedicated a lot of time and effort into feeling in control of the dangers around him. And what he does to Paul Dano's character makes it clear he does have the capacity for violence. They also cast Hugh Jackman for a reason. The movie isn't a deconstruction first, as it's more about the tragedy and mystery, but there's definitely an element of deconstruction. Not necesarily of Taken, but of those kinds of movies, the '...and only one man can stop them' type movies.

Prisoners is ultimately about being helpless, and how the "one man" is just as powerless to do anything. The end really drives it home, where's he's completely dominated by an old lady with a gun. Now, even disregarding any comparison to Taken, with everything we've seen Jackman's character accomplish thus far this one old woman shouldn't be too much trouble for him, but she is. And only because she has a gun. That scene highlights what is probably the realism of being held at gunpoint, where you don't just dive out of the way like the action hero does in the movie, because I mean... it's a gun - what are the chances you're not totally getting shot and killed? In that moment it pretty much deconstructs the character that Jackman was up till that point. And then at the very end it's him blowing that safety whistle.
 
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Gordon_4

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Jackman's character is a prepper/survivalist. We're introduced to him hunting; a very traditional and idealized manly act, signifying him providing for his family. And as the movie progresses it's shown he's a man who is (expected anyway) to take the lead and do things his own way. We see he has shelves of canned goods, and he has his daughter wearing a safety whistle. While this doesn't make him an ex-commando, he isn't just your average dad who works as a carpenter.
In the grand scheme of things, it does still make him an average dad. There is a gulf of difference between a guy who is packing canned foods and practising to hunt his own food and make his own clothes and the sort of guy who can get the deputy director of French Intelligence to meet him in a Paris park.
 
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Casual Shinji

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In the grand scheme of things, it does still make him an average dad. There is a gulf of difference between a guy who is packing canned foods and practising to hunt his own food and make his own clothes and the sort of guy who can get the deputy director of French Intelligence to meet him in a Paris park.
Sure, but I don't think he's ever meant to be this badass. He's the very traditional 'man of the house', the dad who will take care of any problem that comes their way. He thinks of himself as someone who can take care of business. The contrast between him and Maria Bello's character - who spends the entire movie cry-sleeping in bed - is huge. Yet despite her almost complete inaction their achievements are virtually the same. Except she's there to actually see her daughter again. It's not so much about deconstructing his character, but about the cold hard reality revealing even this "strong dad" to be just as helpless as his own daughter. He certainly thought of himself as the Liam Neeson character, fighting the bad guy and finding the house where his daughter is being held to take her away from there, but in reality that's just not what happens.
 
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Thaluikhain

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Ok, so I have a zillion dollar movie, maybe part of a franchise, as all movies are supposed to be.

And you have the fandom wikia go incomplete because the fans were very interested in the shoes someone wears in the first scene and get bored after that. C'mon, your marketing budget can spare a few pages getting done.
 

Drathnoxis

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I hate when the subtitles for anime mess with the honorifics, there's no translation for that sort of thing and they are just digging a hole every time they do it. It's not as if anybody with any familiarity with Japanese culture doesn't already know what they mean anyway so there's no point to it.

Example, in Cardcaptor Sakura Tomoyo and Sakura always call Xiaolang Li by his family name Li-kun while Meiling calls him by his personal name Xiaolang. Later it's a significant moment when Sakura begins calling him Xiaolang and they completely mutilate it by translating it as her calling him "bestie." Ugh! There's also a scene in a later episode where Meiling figures out his feelings for Sakura when he asks her and Sakura if they are ok and I had to watch the scene 4 times before I figured out that the problem was she heard him call her Sakura instead of Kinamoto-san, the latter he has never called her in the subtitles but calls her exclusively for the majority of the series in the Japanese dub.

Like, I shouldn't be having to listen to the dub this closely to follow something so basic. Just leave it untranslated because when you mess with it you are changing the meaning drastically. It's so integral to Japanese culture more often than not it screws up the subtitles. Also, I don't know why they can't translate oni-chan as sister/brother instead of replacing it with their personal name. It's not as damaging, but still dumb.
 

Bob_McMillan

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Also, I don't know why they can't translate oni-chan as sister/brother instead of replacing it with their personal name. It's not as damaging, but still dumb.
Our language has similiar terms, but I would personally find it really weird if they were just directly translated to English. Older brother, older sister... sounds odd. Ideally they'd just leave them untranslated, but I can also understand why they wouldn't want to do that.

Anyway, this recent trend of shows that release weekly releasing more than one episode at a time is ridiculous to me. It really feels like you're admitting that these episodes are too crap on their own to make a week's wait worth it. In which case, why did you even write/edit it this way?
 
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Gordon_4

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Our language has similiar terms, but I would personally find it really weird if they were just directly translated to English. Older brother, older sister... sounds odd. Ideally they'd just leave them untranslated, but I can also understand why they wouldn't want to do that.

Anyway, this recent trend of shows that release weekly releasing more than one episode at a time is ridiculous to me. It really feels like you're admitting that these episodes are too crap on their own to make a week's wait worth it. In which case, why did you even write/edit it this way?
The least awkward translation to English I can think of is big brother/sister, shortening them to bro and sis if you’re feeling sassy.
 
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Bob_McMillan

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The least awkward translation to English I can think of is big brother/sister, shortening them to bro and sis if you’re feeling sassy.
I've heard big brother/sister used in dubs, it is slightly better but still awkward to me honestly. I guess it's because I can't imagine English speaking people ever addressing their siblings that way.

For example, as the only boy in the family, everyone (my parents, uncles, aunts, even older sister) refers to me as "Kuya" which is "older brother". It is used as both a common noun (for example, my sister could point to me and say "that's my kuya") and as a proper noun (if my sister wants something, she'd say "Kuya please hand me that"). At home, I am called Kuya more than my own name. There just really isn't an English equivalent for that.

Fascinating how all our cultures differ in this way. English starts with grandpa/ma and ends with dad/mom. Filipino starts similarly but ends at older brother/sister. Japanese goes all the way from grandparents to younger siblings.
 

Drathnoxis

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I've heard big brother/sister used in dubs, it is slightly better but still awkward to me honestly. I guess it's because I can't imagine English speaking people ever addressing their siblings that way.
Yeah, but these aren't English speaking people. They are Japanese. Dubs can suck as much as they want and I don't care, but I'd like the subs at least to be accurate.
 

Gordon_4

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Yeah, but these aren't English speaking people. They are Japanese. Dubs can suck as much as they want and I don't care, but I'd like the subs at least to be accurate.
No; but the sentence needs to be rendered in grammatically correct English that also captures the spirit of what’s being said. Your Cardcaptor Sakura example is a bad instance of subtitles and you’ll get no argument from me but again even written out, calling someone big brother or big sister as a general form of address is awkward and makes no sense. Something’s gotta give.
 

Drathnoxis

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No; but the sentence needs to be rendered in grammatically correct English that also captures the spirit of what’s being said. Your Cardcaptor Sakura example is a bad instance of subtitles and you’ll get no argument from me but again even written out, calling someone big brother or big sister as a general form of address is awkward and makes no sense. Something’s gotta give.
I don't think so, calling your siblings sister/brother hasn't been terribly uncommon in the past, you see it in classical fiction. Just because you don't see it too much in modern use doesn't mean it's an incorrect usage. Translating it as a personal name they clearly aren't saying is not the way to handle it.
 

Johnny Novgorod

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Disney peaked creatively with Atlantis and comically with Kronk from Emperor's New Groove. Not even necessarily Emperor's New Groove, just Kronk.
 
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Casual Shinji

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Found family is overly idealized. I get it, the idea of not being stuck to blood relatives who hate you or have treated you terribly, and finding other people who actually care and understand you to be your family instead, is a very nice sentiment. And maybe it's my cynical heart, but the whole thing as seen in most fiction always comes across as just as overly perfect as 'true love'.
 
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Thaluikhain

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I am constantly annoyed by the trope of a guy being deliberately incompetent, and that's the reason he's charming and successful. That is not how that works.

I am slightly annoyed by Red Riding Hood, starring Amanda Seyfried, in which a character is called Claude, and he doesn't get clawed.
 
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BrawlMan

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I found most of adult swim's original live-action programming and their later animated stuff either really boring or really bad. Especially their live-action shows. None of them I found interesting nor good. Honestly, their best shows were when they first started. That said Aqua Teen went on way longer than it should have, but I'm glad it got a finale of some kind.
 

Piscian

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I can't reiterate enough to ignore critics on Kong x Godzilla: New empire. This is one of those unusual scenarios where reviews are sharply divided by critics and audiences. Please, see it. I want more of these

Screenshot_20240405-211514.png
 

BrawlMan

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I can't reiterate enough to ignore critics on Kong x Godzilla: New empire. This is one of those unusual scenarios where reviews are sharply divided by critics and audiences. Please, see it. I want more of these

View attachment 10948
I am not even shocked, and I don't care what the critics think. They can be divided until the sun goes out and the fools wouldn't even be a blip worthy of looking on my radar.
 
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Piscian

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I am not even shocked, and I don't care what the critics think. They can be divided until the sun goes out and the fools wouldn't even be a blip worthy of looking on my radar.
Double toasted review is solid but if you haven't watched it I might skip it they spoil a couple big reveals that were pretty awesome in theaters.
 
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