Your video game hot take(s) thread

BrawlMan

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is weird to me when people judge game stories like it's a movie. "Oh this is so gamey." Like, my dudes, it's a game. I NEED a "story" to propel my gaming but a simple revenge or save-the-world situation will be enough to get started. And this is why I defend That Las of Us 2 hahah.
The people who say that are usually insecure about their hobby, or don't like games much to begin with and only using it as a crutch to get somewhere else. See a lot of game journalism. As for LOUS2, too bad many other games before it done the whole cycle of violence and cycle of revenge story better. Killer 7, No More Heroes 1, 2, and TSA, and Ghost of Tsushima (mainly in two side stories) being stand out examples.


On the flip side, I criticize so much current movies and TV for being too video-gamey. When I'm passively watching I want a more engaging complicated narrative because all I'm doing is watching.
I wouldn't know where, because I don't watch that much live action TV anymore. I know the Aquaman movie had some video game type moments, but it was done in a good way. I remember my dad noted and pointed it out.


think that's why my most pleasant surprise in entertainment this year has been decent animated shows based on game properties (I know Castlevania has been out a while but I only got onto it recently). They cleverly took the settings and added original, compelling stories with kickass action.
It just keeps getting better and better for video game adaptations. TV get this right the most, even back when there wasn't much to work with.

Some dork on Polygon wrote an article about how Bayonetta 3 RUINED EVERYTHING for them because the ending and I gotta say I don't give a fig on what the ending is if the game works and is fun.
I won't go into any spoilers, but part of it is because of pairings and certain fans not getting the pairing they wanted. The pairing in the ending is rushed, but hints are given early on in the early portion of the third game. I'm not completely defending it, but like I said before, it's something that's not a big deal. I still enjoyed the game and it was pretty clear Platinum wanted to end this series on their own terms. In case the game didn't sell well, or they went out of business. But given how many people pre-ordered the game on Amazon, the reviews are great, and the game's going to sell fine. So we are more than likely going to get a fourth game at some point.
 
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Old_Hunter_77

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I wouldn't know where, because I don't watch that much live action TV anymore. I know the Aquaman movie had some video game type moments, but it was done in a good way. I remember my dad noted and pointed it out. [/quote[

The Mandalorian felt like watching someone play a bunch of RPG side quests. That's my go-to example because everyone freaking loved that first season.
 
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Old_Hunter_77

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You're talking about episodic storytelling then.
Well not necessarily. It's "episodic storytelling" in a narrative that isn't presented as such.
Mandalorian has an over-arching storyline line about Mando's duty to baby Yoda and his own redemptive arc. But most of the stories are sort of side adventures. That is RPG.
Classic episodic storytelling like a sitcom or original Trek was just different stuff in each episode. Which is fine, 'cause that's just what we used to call "TV."
I'm not saying Mando's approach is wrong necessarily it just feels silly sometimes.
 

Gergar12

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Video Games nowadays suck. Risk-Averse game devs that only release COD, Battlefield, and Generic EA sports games like FIFA, Halo, and so fore. The most innovative company right now is Capcom, and Japanese devs in general with Chinese and Korean devs right behind them.

Young western game designers shouldn't be yelled at for being woke, they should be yelled at for having less creativity than the worst, most boring boomer. I despise my generation's perspective on gaming because they don't have one. The indie scene is where it's at. No AA games either since those are going away.
 

BrawlMan

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Not my Asian.

The person is not exactly wrong. I am not hating on FFXVI, but the Japanese are more than aware that there are plenty of people in the world that are non-Japanese/Asian or non-White. Sega, Capcom, Tango Games, and Platinum Games figured this out years ago.
 

BrawlMan

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I find it ironic Kotaku is against this now. Just 10 years ago when it was already a problem and oversaturated, they either defended this practice sometimes or were indifferent about it. You guys and gals are never consistent with your opinions. Why wait this long to complain about it now?
 

Dalisclock

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I find it ironic Kotaku is against this now. Just 10 years ago when it was already a problem and oversaturated, they either defended this practice sometimes or were indifferent about it. You guys and gals are never consistent with your opinions. Why wait this long to complain about it now?
I mean, I can at least give them credit for finally realizing that shit is oversaturated even if they're really late to the party. I remember defending Ubisoft a few years back but I've soured on them significantly since then, both because of how bloated the AC series has gotten(Odyssey finally broke me) but the more awful shit about how they operate as a company. And on a more serious level, I've gone a full 180 on my political and religious views over the past 20 years. So changing your mind is always possible.

That being said, Kotaku is still pretty garbage a lot of the time though, so don't think I'm trying to be an apologist for them. This is probably more like a broken clock being right twice a day sort of thing.
 

BrawlMan

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I mean, I can at least give them credit for finally realizing that shit is oversaturated even if they're really late to the party
That's the problem: they've been late to the party too many times. It's a case of I and certain other gamers saying "I/We told you so." Kotaku and most others didn't want to listen. "You're living in the past! Embrace modern gaming. Japanese gaming is dying! There is no place for old-school JRPG or old-school FPS! FC, AC, Battlefield, and COD are all that matter now!"
remember defending Ubisoft a few years back but I've soured on them significantly since then, both because of how bloated the AC series has gotten(Odyssey finally broke me) but the more awful shit about how they operate as a company.
You can at least be excused at that time, because most of us didn't know how serious the shit is at that hell spawn company. I may not remember everything on V1, but even when I was a lurker, I had seen a few of your arguments, and at least you usually didn't stoop too low nor make an excuse for everything bad game design decision. As for me, I got sick of EA's, Ubisoft's, and Acitvision's design trends by 2011, 2013, and 2009 respectively. I get bored really easily at times; especially when everyone was trying to jump on COD's dick, or when nearly every major Japanese studio wanted "Westernize" most of their franchises.
That being said, Kotaku is still pretty garbage a lot of the time though, so don't think I'm trying to be an apologist for them.
No, you are not an apologist.

This is probably more like a broken clock being right twice a day sort of thing.
Too bad every single individual reviewer, gamer, blogger, YouTuber, and other review sites beat them to the punch 5-10 years ago.
 
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Drathnoxis

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I agree. I don't think there is a way to make a crafting system fun or interesting. You are either filling out shopping lists, or randomly mixing every item with every other item which is just filling out a shopping list that you can't see ahead of time (or looking up possible combinations on the wiki if you aren't insane). It's not fun and it's usually completely tangential to the main experience of the game.

Games that really lean hard into it like Cataclysm: Dark Days Ahead and Minecraft just tend to get overwhelmingly messy. Like you spend the game picking up every little item that you think may possibly be useful for a crafting recipe, and then 10 hours later you are sitting in a room filled with boxes overflowing with thousands of unsorted items scrolling through lists upon lists trying to decide what you should be or even can be crafting next.

Let's consider some reasons that people craft things in real life and see how those translate to video games:
1. To make money or to save money on something that would be purchased: In this case crafting is simply used to exchange one's time for money, it's a form of a job or chore. This is not applicable to video games because the acquisition of wealth should be fun and engaging on it's own, without needing more tedious alternatives.

2. To make something unique or difficult to acquire: If I make a sculpted wood box with a design of my own creation, it's to exercise my creativity and make something that is unlike what can be purchased elsewhere. If make a cookie recipe I got from my grandmother, it's because they are something that simply cannot be purchased in a store. Neither of these apply to video game crafting systems, because you are simply selecting a predetermined item from a list that will be identical to every other instance of that item. There is no allowance, or even need, for creativity.

3. For the enjoyment of the act of creating: There is enjoyment to be had in learning the skills required to make something and then putting it into practice, these are completely absent in video game crafting systems. The overwhelming majority of crafting systems involve gathering the requisite items and then pushing a button to instantly have an item. There is no skill, and there is nothing engaging about the system.

Looting and gathering is a lot of fun, but crafting is tedious and should be excised from all of gaming forever.
 

Old_Hunter_77

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I find it ironic Kotaku is against this now. Just 10 years ago when it was already a problem and oversaturated, they either defended this practice sometimes or were indifferent about it. You guys and gals are never consistent with your opinions. Why wait this long to complain about it now?
Probably not all the same writers- 10 years is a long time. An outlet like Kotaku (or Escapist, or whatever) will have a general editorial and thematic bent but it is not like one "person" with the same opinion about everything.
When Kotaku categorizes an article as "Commentary" it really is just one person ranting. Essentially a more formal version of this very thread.
 
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BrawlMan

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Probably not all the same writers- 10 years is a long time. An outlet like Kotaku (or Escapist, or whatever) will have a general editorial and thematic bent but it is not like one "person" with the same opinion about everything.
When Kotaku categorizes an article as "Commentary" it really is just one person ranting. Essentially a more formal version of this very thread.
I know all that. I know staff changes, different writers with different opinions, but the site is still should be held accountable for what happended in the past. It still doesn't change whoever was there at the time, or is still there that defended bad practices or made excuses for them.
 
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hanselthecaretaker

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I agree. I don't think there is a way to make a crafting system fun or interesting. You are either filling out shopping lists, or randomly mixing every item with every other item which is just filling out a shopping list that you can't see ahead of time (or looking up possible combinations on the wiki if you aren't insane). It's not fun and it's usually completely tangential to the main experience of the game.

Games that really lean hard into it like Cataclysm: Dark Days Ahead and Minecraft just tend to get overwhelmingly messy. Like you spend the game picking up every little item that you think may possibly be useful for a crafting recipe, and then 10 hours later you are sitting in a room filled with boxes overflowing with thousands of unsorted items scrolling through lists upon lists trying to decide what you should be or even can be crafting next.

Let's consider some reasons that people craft things in real life and see how those translate to video games:
1. To make money or to save money on something that would be purchased: In this case crafting is simply used to exchange one's time for money, it's a form of a job or chore. This is not applicable to video games because the acquisition of wealth should be fun and engaging on it's own, without needing more tedious alternatives.

2. To make something unique or difficult to acquire: If I make a sculpted wood box with a design of my own creation, it's to exercise my creativity and make something that is unlike what can be purchased elsewhere. If make a cookie recipe I got from my grandmother, it's because they are something that simply cannot be purchased in a store. Neither of these apply to video game crafting systems, because you are simply selecting a predetermined item from a list that will be identical to every other instance of that item. There is no allowance, or even need, for creativity.

3. For the enjoyment of the act of creating: There is enjoyment to be had in learning the skills required to make something and then putting it into practice, these are completely absent in video game crafting systems. The overwhelming majority of crafting systems involve gathering the requisite items and then pushing a button to instantly have an item. There is no skill, and there is nothing engaging about the system.

Looting and gathering is a lot of fun, but crafting is tedious and should be excised from all of gaming forever.
Proof of this is something like Kingdom Come: Deliverance having a simulation-style crafting system that could not real be more hands-on, but after gaining so much experience with each recipe they will allow you to fast craft and avoid all that.

So, why bother with it in the first place? Sure, it’s a pretty impressive system but we’re still trying to play a game here, and the sheer repetition of this task to acquire things you routinely need winds up a nuisance after X amount of it all.

If a game is going to have crafting then it should be as superfluous to the main game as possible. Take Elden Ring. You’re naturally traversing the world on horseback as it is, and a quick tap will net whatever materials lay about. Then instead of having to farm a bunch of Souls and fast travel to some vendor, you can just go to your materials inventory on demand and another quick tap will craft whatever is available. Unless you want to specifically farm certain items, like saying the Gold-Pickled Foul Foot for 50% rune boost, or you’re doing something weird like a dagger-only run, you’re spending an absolute minimal amount of time actually dedicated to crafting shit.

God of War seems to be similar overall, in that unless you’re running the bases farming mist echoes or something for the best gear there is a trivial amount of time actually dedicated to crafting shit. You are naturally looting whatever’s dropped from every fight you need to win to progress, and that allows you to build your to a specific play style.

Maybe upgrade systems and skill trees could be more streamlined to be less tedious and grindy, but it also tends to be overwhelming if the player has all abilities or move sets from the onset, to where much of it might end up just being ignored. In that respect introducing things gradually through normal game may be the best compromise. I like how in Ragnarok for instance you advance skill tree tiers by just doing specific attacks. So, you’re naturally going to focus on what you’re most interested in through normal gameplay, and gaining levels happens pretty organically.
 
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BrawlMan

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Maybe upgrade systems and skill trees could be more streamlined to be less tedious and grindy
Bayonetta 3 has the best for upgrades and skill trees (in action games in general) by having three different currencies. Chimera Seeds are used for buying items and accessories, Demon Jewels by defeating demons or doing multiple torture attacks and are used in the skill tree upgrade/buy moves for your weapons or Demon Slaves, and Halos are used for costume and cosmetic items only. What's cool is that most moves are not overly expensive, and you can get them early by playing well, and doing as many Verses as possible. By the end of the game, I had most of the Demon Slave and Weapon moves unlocked. Viola's entire move set I unlocked before the halfway point. And of course, the higher the difficulty, the more of these you can acquire.
 
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Gergar12

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Evil West and Gungrave GORE says hi. If anything, AA games have been making a somewhat slow comeback. Regardless, most AAA games mean nothing to me.
Yes because the AAA game devs are all corpos. They are mostly trash when it comes to creativity. A million space games that all look the same, and feel the same without in-depth economic, and in-game lore story-telling.

Edit: In a nutshell.