Funny events in anti-woke world

Gergar12

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Vox is a billion-dollar company with wall street financiers backing it. Also staffed by many "policy wonks", basically a bunch of douches who believe in means-testing.

I love how they mention we should replace natural gas with solar. What happened to your god-queen Hillary Clinton promoting natural gas. You guys are a bunch of liars. You knew natural gas needs fracking and emits lots of carbon, but less than coal. Disingenuous fucks
 

Trunkage

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Vox is a billion-dollar company with wall street financiers backing it. Also staffed by many "policy wonks", basically a bunch of douches who believe in means-testing.

I love how they mention we should replace natural gas with solar. What happened to your god-queen Hillary Clinton promoting natural gas. You guys are a bunch of liars. You knew natural gas needs fracking and emits lots of carbon, but less than coal. Disingenuous fucks
I think this should be in the woke thread

Clinton lost 5 years ago and is now having trouble getting some of her picks into Biden's cabinet. While Biden is bad, he is protection from Clinton
 

Hawki

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I love how they mention we should replace natural gas with solar. What happened to your god-queen Hillary Clinton promoting natural gas. You guys are a bunch of liars. You knew natural gas needs fracking and emits lots of carbon, but less than coal. Disingenuous fucks
And solar panels are less CO2 intensive than natural gas, even factoring in production. How is any of that controversial?
 
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BrawlMan

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Dwarvenhobble

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And solar panels are less CO2 intensive than natural gas, even factoring in production. How is any of that controversial?
One is renewable (well the panels aren't but that's a long explanation) but natural gas isn't, it will run out at some point so it's hardly green lol
 

Hawki

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One is renewable (well the panels aren't but that's a long explanation) but natural gas isn't, it will run out at some point so it's hardly green lol
Um, yes? That's my point. Natural gas is a better option than coal, but it still emits GHGs, it requires fracking, and it's non-renewable.
 
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Agema

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I love how they mention we should replace natural gas with solar. What happened to your god-queen Hillary Clinton promoting natural gas. You guys are a bunch of liars. You knew natural gas needs fracking and emits lots of carbon, but less than coal. Disingenuous fucks
Natural gas is an improvement over oil and a huge improvement over coal in terms of carbon emissions; realistically we need some fossil fuels to tide us over on the way to renewables, and it's the best of the lot. Viewed as this transitional step to get rid of the worst CO2 pollution, it was and to a substantial extent still is a sensible choice. Let's bear in mind that a lot of renewables tech is improving rapidly. 5+ years ago the case for natural gas was relatively stronger. Given the political angle as well - trying to push anything past a hugely obstinate and well-funded pro-fossil fuel lobby with substantial public support - it also has advantages there.
 

Dwarvenhobble

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Um, yes? That's my point. Natural gas is a better option than coal, but it still emits GHGs, it requires fracking, and it's non-renewable.
Sorry I think some wires got crossed.

Part of the controversy is it was being sold as a better option than coal and I'm guessing Gergar's point was Hillary had some link to some such companies and now people have shifted to pushing Solar because they're not seeing Hillarycrats pushing for the natural gas.
 

Kwak

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Vox is a billion-dollar company with wall street financiers backing it. Also staffed by many "policy wonks", basically a bunch of douches who believe in means-testing.

I love how they mention we should replace natural gas with solar. What happened to your god-queen Hillary Clinton promoting natural gas. You guys are a bunch of liars. You knew natural gas needs fracking and emits lots of carbon, but less than coal. Disingenuous fucks
Where in this list of vox articles on renewable energy is whatever the fuck deluded bullshit you're ranting about?
Here's one from 2014.
 
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Gergar12

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Where in this list of vox articles on renewable energy is whatever the fuck deluded bullshit you're ranting about?
Here's one from 2014.
Watch the video towards the back of it it mentions that we need to replace natural gas with solar.
 

Gergar12

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And? How is that controversial?
Because previously these same centrist goons argue for natural gas over solar.





Edit: Just to be clear, Vox is a neoliberal news outlet that loved Hillary Clinton in the 2016 elections. Hillary, and Vox both supported natural gas during said election. So it pisses me off when these establishment shills turn around and support solar over natural gas right now.
 
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crimson5pheonix

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Natural gas is an improvement over oil and a huge improvement over coal in terms of carbon emissions; realistically we need some fossil fuels to tide us over on the way to renewables, and it's the best of the lot. Viewed as this transitional step to get rid of the worst CO2 pollution, it was and to a substantial extent still is a sensible choice. Let's bear in mind that a lot of renewables tech is improving rapidly. 5+ years ago the case for natural gas was relatively stronger. Given the political angle as well - trying to push anything past a hugely obstinate and well-funded pro-fossil fuel lobby with substantial public support - it also has advantages there.
But you don't build a natural gas plant for the 5-10 year plan of transitioning to green energy, you build it for it's expected lifetime of 25+ years, a big push into fracking and NG like what Hillary was pushing would have just added another economic point against transitioning away from fossil fuels. "Well we built all those new plants and now they're going to be wasted? Why did we even build them in the first place?"
 

Kwak

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Because previously these same centrist goons argue for natural gas over solar.


Edit: Just to be clear, Vox is a neoliberal news outlet that loved Hillary Clinton in the 2016 elections. Hillary, and Vox both supported natural gas during said election. So it pisses me off when these establishment shills turn around and support solar over natural gas right now.
The article is from vox during the election showing her calling for more solar. There are many more vox articles from that era about solar.
 

Agema

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But you don't build a natural gas plant for the 5-10 year plan of transitioning to green energy, you build it for it's expected lifetime of 25+ years, a big push into fracking and NG like what Hillary was pushing would have just added another economic point against transitioning away from fossil fuels. "Well we built all those new plants and now they're going to be wasted? Why did we even build them in the first place?"
A reasonable answer is that we'd want some spare production capacity to turn on at will to back up renewables. The coal and oil stations will be retired, and these become the last generation acting as the reserve to provide the extra when and where needed.

The reality is that you're basically right, it's all fucked. Outside the dreams of progressives, the fossil fuel lobby is too rich, too powerful, too well-connected. They have an entire pet party to do their bidding, and if necessary can bribe a handful of the Democrats to make sure nothing passes that will substantially impede their profits. So pragmatists like Clinton create a compromise to try to keep them on-board that will give some improvement, rather than froth, rage and beat their heads against a wall impotently for another 20 years with oil and coal merrily being burned to the max.
 

XsjadoBlayde

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Now the vast rock is tossed aside for all to see, it is pleasing to watch the horrid critters squirm and scurry.






A paywall?? No no, this will not do. Let's get rid of that silly classist thing.






In the real world, Joshua Alayon worked as a real estate agent in Pompano Beach, Fla., where he used the handle “SouthFloridasFavoriteRealtor” to urge buyers on Facebook to move to “the most beautiful State.”


But online, data revealed by the massive hack of Epik, an Internet-services company popular with the far right, signaled a darker side. Alayon’s name and personal details were found on invoices suggesting he had once paid for websites with names such as racisminc.com, whitesencyclopedia.com, christiansagainstisrael.com and theholocaustisfake.com.



The information was included in a giant trove of hundreds of thousands of transactions published this month by the hacking group Anonymous that exposed previously obscure details of far-right sites and launched a race among extremism researchers to identify the hidden promoters of online hate.


After Alayon’s name appeared in the breached data, his brokerage, Travers Miran Realty, dropped him as an agent, as first reported by the real estate news site Inman. The brokerage’s owner, Rick Rapp, told The Washington Post that he didn’t “want to be involved with anyone with thoughts or motives like that.”



Alayon told The Post that he does not own the ‘racisminc,’ Holocaust-denial or other Web addresses but declined to say if he had owned them in the past; the records were hacked earlier this year. But in a screenshot of his Epik account, which he sent to The Post, the information for four other domains he currently owns matches the private records that can be found in the Epik breach.



Asked why his name, email address and other personal information were listed in company invoices for the ‘racisminc’ and Holocaust-denial domains, Alayon said the data was “easily falsifiable,” that he was the possible victim of extortion and that The Post was “fake news.”


The breach of Epik’s internal records has cast a spotlight on a long-hidden corner of the Internet’s underworld, and researchers expect it could take months before they can process the full cache — the equivalent of tens of millions of pages. Many are digging for information on who owns and administers extremist domains about which little was previously known.



Epik, based outside Seattle, said in a data-breach notice filed with Maine’s attorney general this week that 110,000 people had been affected nationwide by having their financial account and credit card numbers, passwords and security codes exposed. An earlier data-breach letter from the company, filed to comply with Montana law, was signed by the “Epic Security Team,” misspelling the company’s name. An Epik spokesperson said it was a simple typo.



Heidi Beirich, a veteran researcher of hate and extremism, said she is used to spending weeks or months doing “the detective work” trying to decipher who is behind a single extremist domain. The Epik data set, she said, “is like somebody has just handed you all the detective work — the names, the people behind the accounts.”


“This is like the mother of all data lodes because Epik was at the center of so many of the extremist websites and organizations that people like me study. Epik was the place of last refuge for a lot of these sites,” said Beirich, co-founder of the nonprofit Global Project Against Hate and Extremism. “And as the data is analyzed and looked at more deeply, we’re going to see this ecosystem in a way that was simply not possible before.”



Beirich said the identities of administrators and web developers and “the money flow” — how the sites stay afloat — are the kinds of details that for years have challenged even the most veteran hate trackers. The Epik hack might help connect the dots, she added.



Epik’s founder, Robert Monster, who did not respond to requests for comment, said the company’s data was hijacked and urged people not to use it with “negative intent.”


An Epik spokesperson said in emailed statements to The Post this week that the company has handled hundreds of thousands of domains over the years and some are bound to be offensive. The company declined to attribute the statement to a named spokesperson.



The Epik spokeperson called the hack “an egregious violation against our users” and said the breached data included up to 38,000 credit card numbers.



The spokesperson said the company “offers its services to everyone” and that “domains affiliated with right-wing politics comprise less than 1 percent of users.” Epik said it is not aware of its users’ intents and “does not consider its role to be censors of free citizens."


“Our long-held policy of content neutrality has made our platform appealing to some in an increasingly polarized landscape,” the spokesperson said. “We do not endorse or condone any one particular ideology, and we feel uncomfortable with calls to censor those who use our services.”



Though domain registrars, such as Epik, encourage customers to use accurate information when buying a new website address, it is fairly easy to register a domain in somebody else’s name, and many registrars don’t demand independent proof or confirmation of identity.


Buyers wanting privacy commonly ask their registrar to conceal their information, including, in Epik’s case, through an add-on service called Anonymize.


Some basic details about a website domain’s owner are publicly available in what’s known as a “WHOIS” database. But the Epik breach revealed far more than that information. Materials from the hack reviewed by The Post include not just names and home addresses but full credit card numbers, unencrypted passwords and other highly sensitive data. Many website owners who trusted Epik to keep their identities hidden were exposed, but some who took additional precautions, such as paying in bitcoin and using fake names, remain anonymous.



The Post publicizes material obtained through hacking with caution, only after verifying its authenticity and ascertaining that there is news value in bringing such information to light.


Epik provides Web services to many prominent right-wing fixtures online, including the media group One America News, the video site Bitchute, the social media site Gab and the message board Patriots.win. Other domains show links to targeted harassment campaigns of journalists or activists, including by falsely linking them to allegations of heinous acts.



The company was used last month to register the domain for Strikebackforfreedom.com, a campaign that attorney Lin Wood, a supporter of former president Donald Trump, has said on Telegram was bought by his FightBack Foundation. The site says it is affiliated with Sidney Powell and other prominent purveyors of false conspiracy theories about election fraud and the coronavirus vaccine, and it urged people to “STOP doing business with the enemy,” such as companies mandating that employees get vaccinated.


A huge proportion of the 1.8 million domains shown in the breached data appear ordinary, with Web addresses for people interested in real estate, home improvement, vegan cooking, various types of spirituality — as well as the occasional domain devoted to pornography, gaming and cryptocurrency. Many do not appear to connect to active websites.


Hacked documents showing details from nearly a million Epik invoices over the last several years underscore the high-volume, low-dollar nature of the domain registry business. While there are dozens of domains worth hundreds or even thousands of dollars, most are worth far less: Only about 2 percent of the invoices since 2019 were for more than $10; nearly half were for less than a dollar.



Among the more expensive ones was the domain Patriots.win, now used for the pro-Trump site that sought to replicate a message board, known as TheDonald, after its domain owner shut it down following the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. A man listing an address in Louisville paid $413 for the Patriots.win domain in January, the invoice records show. He did not respond to requests for comment and his identity could not be independently confirmed.


Aubrey “Kirtaner” Cottle, a security researcher and co-founder of Anonymous, declined to share information about the hack’s origins but said it was fueled by hackers’ frustrations over Epik serving as a refuge for far-right extremists.


“Everyone is tired of hate,” Cottle said. “There hasn’t been enough pushback, and these far-right players, they play dirty. Nothing is out of bounds for them. And now … the tide is turning, and there’s a swell moving back in their direction.”



Shireen Mitchell, founder of Stop Online Violence Against Women, a group that has tracked online extremism since 2013, said the Epik hack is forcing a long overdue examination of Internet-service companies that haven’t drawn the same scrutiny or talk of regulation as social media giants.



While many researchers are using the data to look forward, including to push for consequences for the people behind the most toxic sites, Mitchell said she’s left asking questions about why Epik for so long helped give a platform to extremist content on the Web.



“We don’t even have a true measurement of it,” Mitchell said of the scope of online hate. “We don’t know how it started, how small it was, how it is amplified and how big it is. Which would also tell us how big it could get unless we do something about it.”



The role of Epik and other alternative Internet-services companies drew mainstream attention in the aftermath of the “Unite the Right” rally in 2017, when white supremacists who organized online converged on Charlottesville Until then, domain registrars and Web hosts had traditionally taken a hands-off approach to content unless it involved explicitly criminal activity, Beirich said, but the weekend’s deadly violence sparked calls for tech companies to more aggressively police what they kept online.



One year later, Epik’s founder — whose last name, Monster, is confirmed to be real in Washington state voting records and a 1991 court judgment in New York — further involved himself in the debate following a mass shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh.



As the nation recoiled at the attack that left 11 dead, Monster was mulling a different problem: deplatforming. He was deeply concerned that a right-wing social media site, Gab, had been knocked offline because the Pittsburgh shooter had been active there, sharing and spreading anti-Semitic hate until moments before the attack.



In a blog post eight days after the shootings, Monster praised Gab as a “haven for free speech” and said its embattled founder, Andrew Torba, had acted “courageously.” Monster pledged that Epik would help Gab get back online, adding, “Let Freedom Ring.”



The move — similar to stands Epik would later take after other tragedies, including the live-streamed murders of 51 people in two New Zealand mosques in 2019 — elevated the little-known domain registry in suburban Seattle to the center of a roiling national debate over Big Tech and Internet freedom. It also made Epik a hero to many on the right and a target for many on the left.



The result of this can be seen plainly in the celebratory tone used by the hacker collective Anonymous when it announced the breach, as well as in the excitement of critics — both political opponents and extremism researchers — as they began attempting to reconstruct Epik’s business from the vast quantity of stolen data that includes 843,000 transactions over more than 10 years, plus nearly a million invoices. The data, which is hosted online for public download, totals more than 150 gigabytes.



The data includes internal memos describing apparent subpoenas from law-enforcement agencies for information about Epik-registered websites, including two domains, Thedonald.win and Maga.host, in the weeks after the Capitol riot on Jan. 6. The notes do not include details of the subpoenas’ targets, the investigating agencies or any alleged crimes.



One of the internal notes, which appeared to have been written by an Epik employee, mentions a grand jury subpoena, a request to preserve records for 90 days and a nondisclosure order — a court-approved document that law enforcement can secure to prohibit tech companies from telling customers what information they’d shared as part of an investigation. “DO NOT tell Registrant,” read the note, which did not include further details of the investigation.



Some activists online also pointed to data showing that Monster’s name and an Epik email address used for purchasable domains were included on Web addresses such as robmonsterenablesnazis.com and sexynazis.com. The Epik spokesperson said the company has used an automated system to add Monster’s name to domains marked for sale or deletion, even though he has never owned the individual domains.



Epik also has a corporate overlap with VanwaTech, a company that, according to online records, has provided Internet services to the neo-Nazi site Daily Stormer and 8kun, the central node for spreading conspiracy theories central to the QAnon ideology.



Epik bought BitMitigate, a cybersecurity service that was protecting the Daily Stormer from online attacks, from VanwaTech’s owner, Nick Lim, in 2019. Though Epik reportedly severed its relationship with the neo-Nazi site, Lim became chief technical officer of Epik for a time while maintaining his ownership of VanwaTech, based in Vancouver, Wash.



Lim told The Post he remains a partial owner of Epik, and in a Bloomberg profile of Lim, he called Monster “a kind of mentor.” But an Epik spokesperson said the company “does not currently have a relationship with VanwaTech or its owner.”



VanwaTech’s data was not part of the Epik breach, Lim said. Asked if he still considers Monster a mentor, Lim told The Post: “Everyone in my life is a mentor, whether that is what to do or not to do — you can always learn something from everyone. And not everything about everyone is good or bad. People can do both good and bad things, nobody is perfect.”



The domains listed in the Epik hack represent a broad spectrum of far-right extremism, including white supremacists, xenophobic groups and anti-government agitators. Some users appear to have relied on Epik to lead a double life, with several revelations so far involving people with innocuous day jobs who were purportedly purveyors of hate online.



Others, however, belong to high-profile extremist trolls who were “deplatformed” and found their way to Epik, where they continued to harass leftist activists, mainstream journalists and other targets.



Melissa Lewis, a self-described anti-fascist activist and writer in Portland, Ore., said her family spent months feeling “hunted” by far-right troll and convicted hacker Joseph “Joey” Camp, whose name was listed on domain registrations with Epik and who has claimed publicly to have done freelance work for Monster.



Lewis said Camp — whose targets have included not just far-left activists but also conservative favorite Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-Colo.) — sent her harassing emails, posted her home address and disseminated photos of her online, resulting in Lewis being added to extremist hit lists. She said Camp also went after her father, an emergency room doctor, by posting the human resources number to his hospital and spinning tales about her dad “letting cops and patriots die” in the ER. Lewis said her father, too, began receiving death threats, prompting the hospital to take security precautions.



Lewis complained to Epik last year with a rundown of Camp’s alleged violations of the platform’s terms of service. The company responded largely by dismissing her, explaining that there wasn’t enough information to identify the harasser and suggesting that she was aligned with militant leftists who have marched “in the street for the past year burning down buildings and celebrating anarchy,” according to email exchanges reviewed by The Post.



All of this is why Lewis greeted news of the Epik breach with relief — and a measure of glee. The satisfaction, Lewis tweeted, was “better than any orgasm.”



An Epik spokesperson said the company condemns “persecution or targeted harassment” and that it investigates and takes appropriate action after reports of abuse.



The spokesperson said Monster hired Camp for “an unrelated matter in early 2020” and that Epik had no knowledge of Camp’s actions. But the spokesperson also said the company had reviewed reports of Lewis’s claims and “did not find a violation at that time.”



In a phone interview, Camp said he had no comment on whether he had domains registered on Epik and that such information was easily falsified. Camp also denied harassing Lewis or her father. After the call, which Camp recorded and posted online, he boasted of “lying to the Washington Post” and began harassing a Post reporter via text and social media.
For some stupid reason it won't let me post without the huge gaps, for crying out loud.
 
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BrawlMan

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A paywall?? No no, this will not do. Let's get rid of that silly classist thing.








For some stupid reason it won't let me post without the huge gaps, for crying out loud.
Good. They're getting their karma and losing their jobs.
 
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XsjadoBlayde

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"Grifters, son. It's nothing thing but grifters all the way down."



Lin Wood agreed to pay his ex-partners an undisclosed amount from former Covington Catholic student Nick Sandmann’s settlements. But Wood’s emails allegedly tell another story.

Published Sep. 26, 2021 4:54AM ET
Embattled pro-Trump lawyer Lin Wood could soon be in even more legal hot water, following allegations by former law partners that he lied to a judge and covered up a scheme to steal their share of settlements involving former Covington Catholic student Nick Sandmann.

Making matters worse for Wood, his one-time partners say he wrote the alleged scheme down in a series of late-night emails—documents they now have.

While Wood made his name as a lawyer for people like falsely accused Atlanta Olympics bombing suspect Richard Jewell, he’s since faced a series of professional setbacks after pivoting toward hunting vaporous evidence of “voter fraud” and promoting the QAnon conspiracy theory.

In August, a federal judge in Michigan referred Wood, Sidney Powell, and other lawyers involved in a 2020 election case to their state bars for potential suspension or disbarment, and ordered them to pay legal fees that could run into hundreds of thousands of dollars. Wood is already facing an unrelated potential disbarment in his home state of Georgia after refusing to take a mental-health exam.

Since September 2020, Wood and three former partners in his office—Nicole Wade, Jonathan Grunberg, and Taylor Wilson—have been locked in a legal fight over the fate of an undisclosed amount of money from settlements involving former Kentucky high school student Nick Sandmann. While Sandmann is only described as an unnamed “Disputed Client” in legal filings around the case, it’s clear from details in the motions that he’s the person being described.

Sandmann’s much-discussed 2019 encounter with a Native American activist at the Lincoln Memorial created a national media debate and turned the MAGA hat-wearing student into a conservative cause célèbre. With Wood as one of his attorneys, Sandmann settled cases against CNN and The Washington Post for undisclosed amounts in 2020.

Those settlements are now at the center of the lawsuit between Wood and his ex-partners, who quit his practice in 2020 after a series of bizarre incidents involving Wood, including an alleged assault on one of the lawyers. For his part, while Wood concedes he described the lawyers as his “partners,” he says they were never truly partners in his firm.

As part of the firm’s break-up, Wood agreed in a March 2020 agreement to pay his ex-partners an undisclosed amount of what he would receive from Sandmann’s settlements. But now, the plaintiffs in the case say Wood was already scheming behind the scenes to dupe them out of the settlement money.

Around 3 a.m. one day in February 2020, the ex-partners allege, Wood sent two emails to Todd McMurtry, his co-counsel on the Sandmann cases. In the emails, entitled “A good idea!” and “Taylor, Jonathan, and Nicole,” Wood purportedly pressed McMurtry to work with the “Disputed Client” to sign an agreement that would take advantage of a Georgia legal rule about payments by objecting to the three other lawyers receiving any money from the Sandmann cases.

“In short, I need your help and the help of [Disputed Client] to nip this nonsense in the bud quickly and quietly… Will you help me?” Wood wrote, according to one court filing.

If genuine, the emails show Wood plotting, in detail, to make sure that his ex-partners wouldn’t receive money from Sandmann’s cases, even as he moved closer to signing an agreement with them to share the funds.

“Their efforts to be greedy could damage me, my family, my legacy, and my clients—which include your clients [REDACTED] if the disputes become public,” Wood allegedly wrote to McMurtry. “This needs to be nipped on the bud and quickly so.”

In July 2020, when Wood was due to hand over the agreed share of the Sandmann money to his ex-partners, he instead insisted that he couldn’t give them any money because the unnamed client had objected to anyone besides Wood receiving money. Wood would later claim that he had no role in the client’s decision not to share the funds—an allegation undermined by his own emails, according to his ex-partners.

“That is fraud,” the former partners allege in one court filing.

Complicating Wood’s position in the case, his ex-partners say he didn’t hand over the emails during discovery, the process in which opposing sides exchange relevant documents in a case. Instead, they say Wood concealed the emails’ existence, lying under oath that he had provided them with all of the documents they asked for.

“Defendants hid their own emails revealing their fraud and actively lied about it to plaintiffs and the court,” the ex-partners allege in their new filing, referring to Wood and his firm.

But while Wood allegedly hid the emails, he had already forwarded them to another attorney in Nevada, who gave them to the plaintiffs earlier this month.

In an email to The Daily Beast, Wood called the accusations that he had lied to a judge about the alleged existence of the scheme and the emails “provably false.” He went on to suggest this article was a part of “Operation Mockingbird,” a conspiracy theory popular with QAnon believers that holds that the CIA controls media outlets.

“This latest motion is just another in a long line of motions seeking to gain negative publicity against me in Communist Mockingbird propaganda rags like The Daily Beast,” Wood wrote. “Litigation by false accusations will not end well for my opponents.

Andrew Beal, the attorney for Wood’s ex-partners, told The Daily Beast his clients “carefully considered” the motion containing the potentially explosive emails.

“We feel real strongly about the motion that we filed,” Beal said.

Despite facing legal issues across the country, Wood has kept up his promotion of conspiracy theories. At a fundraiser this month for Georgia gubernatorial candidate Kandiss Taylor, for example, Wood claimed the United States government carried out the 9/11 attacks, and said that former President George W. Bush will either be imprisoned in Guantanamo Bay or executed by firing squad for his supposed role in 9/11.

Wood also declared that Joe Biden has never “set foot” in the White House, an apparent reference to conspiracy theories that the Biden administration is being faked, possibly on a Hollywood soundstage.
"Communist mockingbird propaganda" - Ffs someone put this insufferable asshole away before he hurts more people.
 
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The Rogue Wolf

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" After Alayon’s name appeared in the breached data, his brokerage, Travers Miran Realty, dropped him as an agent, as first reported by the real estate news site Inman. The brokerage’s owner, Rick Rapp, told The Washington Post that he didn’t “want to be involved with anyone with thoughts or motives like that.” "

CANCEL CULTURE! You can't stop doing business with someone just because they promote Nazi idealism! Also, fire Colin Kaepernick!